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Discussion Starter #1
Got the carburetors on my 87' and 89' rebuilt yesterday. Having the damn'dest time getting the rear boot seated. I get it in there, but then when I pull it forward to seat the front boot, the carburetor pull forward from the rear boot!!!

Any suggestions on getting this right? Thanks
 

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Some recent posts on here about the rubber shrinking over time. I got my replacement boots from Partzilla. Best price I could find but still pricey. They let me return one I thought I needed but didn’t.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
it's not really that it's shrinking, it's that when I get the rear boot seated and band clamped down as tight as it goes it will still pop right out when I pull the carburetor forward to fasten the front boot. The band clamp got bent a little when I removed the carburetor, so I'm gonna get new clamps and see if that works.
 

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If you have a 87 and 89, I guarantee they've shrunk and hardened. With new/unshrunken boots, you don't have to pull anything, just the opposite, you might wish they were farther apart for ease of installation. They've shrunk overall at least a half an inch and probably more.
 

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On my '89 I tried everything. Boiling, a heat gun, petroleum jelly altogether and it just wouldn't seal. Ended up having to order a new one, if I recall, and all was well. On my '07 TW it's quite a bit easier, just rebuilt my carb the other night. I was surprised and relieved I didn't have to order another, but they seem cheaper now than back then.

Regardless, once you do have it together, remember to spray for leaks around the intake boot and the intake manifold on the other side, especially where it seals to the cylinder. I don't know how experienced you are but if it's sucking air anywhere it'll rev up a bit when a mist of WD40 or carb cleaner and such get through. You don't want that.
 

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If I remember correctly I had the same problem and loosened the bolts that hold the air box in place and push it forward and snug them back up. Wasn't much but something.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone. I simply just bought the OEM rear boot for not too much cost. Haven't installed it yet, but I'm sure it'll be a nicer squeeze than the 30 year old ones.
 

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Perhaps try all future carb work leaving front boot attached to intake manifold and simply unbolt manifold from head and work/remove/repair/ re-install carb with manifold attached to carb as an assembly. Slides in and out with need to address only one boot's fitment. I find this much easier than the conventional approach. With carb firmly re-clamped to rear boot any "shortage" at the front can then be easily sucked up using the two manifold-to-head bolts. Also helps to disconnect the turn signal flasher for greater clearance on newer model TWs.
 

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If the new replacement boots were not available I would figure out some work around because over time they do harden, shrink and get shorter. The boots are still available so just bite the bullet and replace it rather than fight an old hard one. One thing we have learned very well is that an air tight seal around both boots is an absolute necessity for the carb to perform right.

GaryL
 

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The trick of unbolting the carb boot from the head is a good one. Makes it easy peasy to slide in and out.

I have stuffed the carb back into it's two boots, doing the engine side first, then using a long screwdriver to "peel" the intake boot around the carb mouth. It's not terribly elegant but after you do it a few times not that difficult.

A bit of silicone spray lube makes finicky/tight boots a lot easier to deal with also.

My Beta enduro has a neat trick to address this problem- the entire rear subframe pivots. Remove seat, undo 2 bolts, and the whole ass of the bike pivots 90* and points straight up, taking the airbox and intake boot with it. Access to the carb is wide open.
 

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The trick of unbolting the carb boot from the head is a good one. Makes it easy peasy to slide in and out.

I have stuffed the carb back into it's two boots, doing the engine side first, then using a long screwdriver to "peel" the intake boot around the carb mouth. It's not terribly elegant but after you do it a few times not that difficult.

A bit of silicone spray lube makes finicky/tight boots a lot easier to deal with also.

My Beta enduro has a neat trick to address this problem- the entire rear subframe pivots. Remove seat, undo 2 bolts, and the whole ass of the bike pivots 90* and points straight up, taking the airbox and intake boot with it. Access to the carb is wide open.
TWs sure could have used that Beta's swing away trick for carb removal. I have often thought a better design for that rear air box boot would have been a flexible one that could squeeze and stretch a little. I do get the idea of silicone spray to make the carb slip in easier however that could also allow the clamp area to slip off easier and allow some air in. I have used a little dawn dish soap that tends to dry over a day or so and forms a better seal once you clamp it tight. The stock clamps tend to bottom out before you can get the seal tight enough and if your boot has shrunk they just don't cut it. I have used a 1/4 inch piece of duct tape on the outside of the boot where the clamp goes in the recessed slot just to get a better grip until a new boot arrived.

GaryL
 

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Sometimes the rear boot will twist in the air box. The angle of the dangle is really important for everything to fit. Ive had good luck installing the front rubber first then rotating the rear rubber until it fits proper. A pain, way better to get a new rubber. I know my Daddy used to tell me them rubbers are single use item. The whole job is made much easier if you set your bike at eye level, like on a bench. Warmth helps like set in Sun or borrow the wife hair dryer.
 
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