TW200 Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
First, keep in mind I am an older lady with minimum knowledge and tools. That being said, I try to fix things myself if I can. Please forgive my lack of proper terms. (I do know chain and sprocket!)

While on a ride yesterday, I went over some downed wood. Something must have gotten thrown up, coz the bike stopped immediately and I found the chain off the rear sprocket. Called a friend, we loaded the bike into the truck so I could work on it at home. At first I thought it was some kind of rubber strap that was caught up by the front sprocket. Today I got a better look and the rubber thing is a part of the bike, looks like some kind of guide thing towards the gear box. The chain had come around the front sprocket and rolled up double on itself between the front sprocket and rubber thing. Got to thinking that the rubber thing has some give to it, so maybe I can pull the chain loose. Also, luckily the master link was nearby so I was able to remove it and get a better handhold on the chain. With lots of pulling and some shoving with a flathead screwdriver, the chain unfolded from that area and came loose. I got it back over the rear sprocket and reattached the master link. YES, I got the squeezy thing pointed in the right direction, thanks to reading a tutorial on here!

The bike started right up, went thru the gears and all seems to be running fine. I am one happy camper. But, my question is, should the chain have gone together that easy? Once I got it back in place, the two ends easily came together to be connected with the master link. I'm guessing it should have felt like more pulling together would be involved.

And yes, if you think the chain sounds too loose, I'll get out my manual and get it tightened up. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,229 Posts
I can easily remove and replace my master link without having to loosen the axle. I do it every time I clean and oil my chain. I have had zero problems ( so far ) with the chain coming off.



I also believe a little loose is better than a little tight. To tight can cause some real damage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Hmmm, is there a rule of thumb as to how loose or tight the chain should be? If this was my chain saw, I'd know for sure on the tightness.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Without looking it up in the manual your chain should move up and down about 1.5 to 2 inches total. Check the chain in a few places and measure the point where it is the tightest. Hope that doesnt cause more contusion. Be sure to keep it lubricated with a good chain lube also
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
Download the Owners Manual from the pinned Topics at top the this forum. Page 6-26 explains how to adjust the chain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Without looking it up in the manual your chain should move up and down about 1.5 to 2 inches total. Check the chain in a few places and measure the point where it is the tightest. Hope that doesnt cause more contusion. Be sure to keep it lubricated with a good chain lube also


Thank you. I did look in the manual but couldn't find anything except that one should check the tension before each ride. sigh I appreciate your help, and the others too!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
976 Posts
From the manual:



Drive Chain Slack: 35.0-60.0 mm (1.38-2.36 in)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,369 Posts
Keep an eye on the clip tension. If it isn't an absolute pain to install the clip, you need a new clip.



Not to freak you out, but you dodged a bullet this time. Losing a chain can cost you two feet of stitches down the back of your leg, or worse. You could also have shattered your engine cases or side covers when the chain balled up in there or had the rear wheel lock up at speed.



Keep a spare master and on your keychain or helmet lock, just in case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Keep an eye on the clip tension. If it isn't an absolute pain to install the clip, you need a new clip.



Not to freak you out, but you dodged a bullet this time. Losing a chain can cost you two feet of stitches down the back of your leg, or worse. You could also have shattered your engine cases or side covers when the chain balled up in there or had the rear wheel lock up at speed.



Keep a spare master and on your keychain or helmet lock, just in case.


When you talk about the clip, are you talking about the clip that holds the master link in place? If so, it was a PIA to get off and back on. Very tight. A needle nose pliers can do things my fingernails never could. No you didn't freak me out
It was a slow speed <10 mph. while I was maneuvering around downed wood. So far it seems like everything is good and I consider myself very lucky. I love that bike. It takes me to places up in the Keweenaw Cty. up in the U.P. of Michigan where I could never get to in my truck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,369 Posts
I guess what I meant was that they don't just fall off without cause. Either they weren't fully snapped on in the first place or they've lost tension.



It happens to the best of us sooner or later. Carry spares.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,307 Posts
I immediately knew you'd mention some sort of bump in the ride when I read the title. It happens to everybody at some point, usually earlier than later I think.



Before I had mastered (who am I kidding?) bike maintenance, I let a chain go too lose, then laid the bike down in a patch of gravel. Banged myself up pretty good, but the bike was all there, aside from some lever ends. Started up good, wouldn't move a bit. The immediate slinging motion of the swingarm threw the loose chain off the sprockets. I was very lucky it didn't separate and be eaten by the motor or my leg. I had to stash the bike in the woods and walk a few miles home, in the dark, with a fractured ankle and gravel in my shoulder.



Anyway, long story short, keep up on the maintenance, read the manuals, and enjoy the ride!



Oh, and by the way, make sure that rubber chain guide is as it should be. You can view diagrams online or see pictures here on the site. If it's worn away, it's annoying to replace, but you definitely need something there. Even if the chain has the right slack, it slaps around enough to tear the swingarm up there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Glad to hear you survived slipping your chain without much damage to you or your TW.



Once I lost my chain the first time it kept slipping off despite tightening it to the proper tension. Once I got stuck on a trail in West Virginia far from any roads. It led to a very long day for me and my friend who had to ride a long way to get his truck while I had to push my TW out of the woods. I eventually determined that my rear sprocket was slightly bent. I'm not sure if this happened as a result of the first time I threw the chain or if I hit it on something.



I strongly recommend replacing your stock chain with a quality o-ring chain (and replace your sprockets at the same time). It won't stretch nearly as much and it will run much smoother and quieter. Plus, you will have peace of mind while you are riding that you are less likely to throw it again.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top