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Discussion Starter #1
Let's start by knowing I'm new to the motorcycle world. I have just over 900 miles on my 2019 tw.
I set my bike down on its left side going up a sandy hill. While trying to walk it up the last bit of the hill in 1st gear, the rear tire dug a decent hole and I suspect the rear sprocket was in the dirt. I got up the hill and continued riding until my bike stalled. The chain had come off and got crammed between the front sprocket and a rubber guide piece. I got it loose and put the chain back on.
But.
While I was limping home the chain came off again in my driveway.
Is this something that motorcycle guys deal with a lot? I've heard competing stories on chain stretch. I've also heard that stock tw chains are not very good.
I hadn't checked the chain tension prior. Should this happen at 900 miles?
Questions/comments please!
 

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Inspect your chain and sprockets. If all appears ok lube that chain up good by soaking it in 80-90 weight gear oil, let it drip dry, reinstall and adjust to proper chain tension. This is not a normal thing for the chains to come off so easily. They stretch so easily I actually recommend a new o-ring chain before the sprockets get worn out.
 

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The stock chains seem to stretch quite a bit for some folks, I'd say partly because it's not adjusted very well from the shop and wears prematurely. Putting weight on it can change tension as well. I've been exactly where you are before. If nothing is damaged you can probably clean and reuse. If my sprockets were in good shape still I'd get a new chain.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I've heard that x and o chains are far superior to our stock chain. Is there a particular size for the 2019 tw? Is it bike specific or by the link or what?
 

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Application
Make: Yamaha
Model: TW200
Year: 1995-2012
OEM Sprockets Front-Rear: 14-50
OEM Chain Pitch-Links: 428-122

It looks like all including the 2019 use a 428 chain. You can count your links on your current chain and cut to size if it is too long. Too long can be adjusted, too short and you're in trouble. Most on the forum like the removable master links. My reason is that I had a chain pop off and get hung once. I had to pull the master link off in order to untangle the chain to put it back on.
 

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I had to tighten the crappy stock chain too many times and too often. I replaced it with an X Ring at 700 miles and haven't had to adjust it yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
For sure, the lower run for the measurement to adjust slack. Since my chain fell off there is now slack on the upper run as well.
Should the upper run be fairly tight with all the slack on the lower run or should there be some slack on the upper run also?
Or am I over thinking it?
 

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Forget the upper run, when you ride, that bit will go tighter anyway – it’s the lower run you need to be looking at

With the bike on the side-stand, walk up to it, and place the toe of your boot half way along underneath the lower run of the chain – and try lifting the chain up with your foot

If you have a couple of inches of slack, that a good thing – less than that it’s too tight, more than that it’s too loose – it’s not an exact science, just a quick test before you ride each time

You’ll get a feel for the method eventually, most of do it without thinking these days ….
 

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Picture this: You have a chain loop on two sprockets – one static, one free running. With the bike in neutral, on the stand, the rear wheel is your static, the engine sprocket is the free running one

When you lift up the lower chain run, the engine sprocket free runs to transfer any slack to the lower section of the chain – make sense ?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yeah, i think i was overthinking it. When the front sprocket turns it will pull all the slack from the upper run (giving it to the lower run). For some reason i was thinking if the upper run was too tight it could damage stuff. Now i see that doesn't make sense.
Probably something i could have deduced while adjusting the tension...
It is WAY off by the way.
 

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Unless you yourself did a chain adjustment it sounds like crappy dealer-prep to me. I mean, how much more simple of a safety check can you do before handing over a brand-new motorcycle to a customer no matter zero or plenty of experience?

If your sprockets (front & rear) are not damaged I say just adjust properly and expect to do so every 500 to 800 miles if you are doing off-road mixed with street. The stock chain is totally acceptable but of a bargain basement "adequate" type. Your bike is so new that unless you want to mess around with gearing changes (un-needed) I'd just use it until it wears out. Or if it got damaged when the chain came off. Check the teeth carefully. You said it came off twice? If so the 2nd time was kinda your fault. Read the manual or look at a very basic youtube video, any bike or brand. Doesn't have to be a TW.

Invest in a better and far superior "O" or "X" chain when you go to make the change. Won't make your bike go faster but certainly a huge performance upgrade from the factory chain.

Here's what I went to and if you put "chain" or sprocket change into search you will find this and a lot of other great information repeated agin and again.

I think I just used this picture (below) on the forum a few days ago. Put this set-up on at 750 miles. Just passed 3000 miles commuting to and from work yesterday and have yet to adjust. 2200-2300 miles between changes is pretty darn good IMO. DID is a great chain but with "No-Ring" the Yamaha factory version is kinda a piece of crap:

IMG_5361.JPG
 

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The stock chain type is a well known element that we all lived with 30 or 40 years ago. From new, it stretches horribly, then settles down, then breaks. We used to adjust these chains on almost a weekly basis , which is probably where the “boot under the chain” thing comes from – necessity

In the mid ‘80’s, along came the “O” ring chain, which was a significant improvement – and today, we have the “X” ring, which is even better

Meanwhile, Yamaha, in their wit and wisdom, regard this as a “cheap” bike, and so put the cheapest parts on it (like the chain), to keep the purchase price down when buying new. The manufacturers guarantee is one year, which is about what you can expect from a stock chain – a strange co-incidence perhaps

But let’s take a closer look at the “tech”. The stock chain has nothing to stop sand and grit from getting inside the rollers, which increases wear (stretch) tenfold. Once the grease inside there is replaced by sand, the chain will stretch incredibly quickly. “Back in the day”, we then used to take off the chain, drop it into what amounted to a “tin bath”, stick it on the cooker, in the hope that at least some of the grease in the tin bath would then melt back inside the rollers. This lasted for about a week, as obviously there was no way of getting the sand and grit back out of the things

This is what we call “initial stretch” – the first 1000 miles, when the chain would need constantly adjusting – and I do mean “constantly”. After around the first 1000 miles, the chain would settle down, the insides trashed to their limits, at which point “tight spots” would start to develop. This is when a series of links in a chain become “more seized than their companions”. Trying to determine the slack in a chain was then entirely dependent of whether you had your boot under the “tight spot”, or on the “loose spot” – yeah, it was a bundle of laughs trying to work that stuff out

When you’re riding down the road, and your chain is making that “rum, rum, rum” sound, that’s the start of a tight spot – time for a new chain before it breaks and takes your calf off (which is the prime reason for having a chain guard on there)

Then along came the “O” ring chains, a vast improvement, as now the grit and sand couldn’t get inside the rollers causing your chain to stretch. Many of us became complacent at this point, believing the rise of the O ring to be the saviour of all things related to chain drives. Significantly reduced maintenance times meant less inspections, less chain lube etc, which kind of defeated the point. Sure, now we had chains that were impervious (sort of) to grit, but had little rubber O rings that still needed to be taken care of. So the O rings ran dry, started to overheat and break up, and the “tight spots” came back – 15,000 miles was about the limit of a (neglected) O ring chain, and yes, guilty as charged

Then came the “X” ring chains - the “latest and greatest”. By now, most of us had figured out the “user errors” with O rings, and re-acquainted ourselves with chain lube. Whereas before we were trying to get the lube inside the chain rollers to prevent chain wear, we had now learned that the “wear point” had moved to the outside of the chain, to the metal surface contact points of the sprockets, and the need to keep those little rubber bits from disintegrating from heat friction. The other difference between O ring and X ring, is that the O rings where creating more friction, and thus more heat, and sapping power because of that (while self-destructing more easily, simply because of that friction and heat) – it’s all in the profile

https://www.rockcitycycles.com/whats-the-difference-between-o-ring-and-x-ring-chains/

OK, that’s enough of the theory, so what does this mean in practice ?

Basic chains will stretch almost every hundred miles, requiring constant adjustment, until they eventually settle down , at which point the damage has been done

O ring chains are much better, as long as you remember to keep them (O rings) lubed. Adjustment will be less frequent, as the greatest wear point (compared to normal chains) is now external, compared to internal

X ring chains, improve on the O ring version, simply by their lack of compression while going round on there, which improves friction, (the main killer on these seals), while still keeping the crap out of the rollers

Standard chain – check every week, especially when new
O ring chain – check every month, although “when new” they’re often at their best
X ring chain – “new technology”, although (myself included), report no adjustment needed in the first thousand miles. Keep it lubed and let us know how you get on

The check for tight spots is “likely” to be six months for the standard chain, two years for the O ring chain – the X ring remains unknown

Changing both of the sprockets and the chain together as a set, is equally important to the above advice. 5000 on a standard chain is going to accelerate sprocket wear, making the above comparisons pointless. For the sake of a few bucks, change out the lot together, then you know where you are. Fresh sprockets and chain are your best bet

There are people on here who pride themselves on making the standard chain last as long as possible – please understand, this is a specialist subject as far as they’re concerned, and they take considerable pride in it (while carrying a spare chain just in case) …….
 

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Heh. I remember the "tin bath". :p What a mess! Then the chain would fling off all that carefully applied grease onto your calf. :mad:
Chain guards? Only sissies bikes had those!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I guess the second one was my fault. After it came off the 1st time in the woods I was able to get it back on. I decided I could try to ride it directly home. The second time it came off i was going slowly entering my driveway. I was able to stop quickly because I was expecting it.
I looked at the sprockets, they look good. I am going to clean, lube, and adjust the chain (watched the tdubskid video). I have a very short riding season due to rotational work in alaska. That means about 6 weeks of actual riding time. Subtract all the other tasks associated with life and that doesn't leave much time. Maybe I'll replace the chain in the winter...
 

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My stock chain was still stretching at 1400 miles. I started to think, "If it is getting longer, will it get so long that it doesn't fit the sprockets any more?" That question and the weekly adjustments made me buy an "X-ring". Love it! Install, adjust, ride. I haven't had to adjust it except once at about 200 miles. It hasn't needed adjustment in the last 1700 miles.
 

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I guess the second one was my fault. After it came off the 1st time in the woods I was able to get it back on. I decided I could try to ride it directly home. The second time it came off i was going slowly entering my driveway. I was able to stop quickly because I was expecting it.
I looked at the sprockets, they look good. I am going to clean, lube, and adjust the chain (watched the tdubskid video). I have a very short riding season due to rotational work in alaska. That means about 6 weeks of actual riding time. Subtract all the other tasks associated with life and that doesn't leave much time. Maybe I'll replace the chain in the winter...
Yeah, take your time. No hurry use it till you can't.
Also... I guess you better change your handle to "Ifinallygotone" or something like that?

Congrats on getting the bike.
May you have Happy, Safe and Fun miles in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Cleaned, lubed, and adjusted. Crisis averted.
There will definitely be a x or o chain in my future, but today is for riding!
P.S. My dealership is not helpful. Barring catastrophic events I will only go back for fluids, filters, gaskets, and orings.
 

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Ride now. Then let Amazon send you new 122 link 428 O-ring, or X-ring this winter with new sprockets front and rear, plus a left cover gasket this winter. Oddly enough sometimes longer length 428 chain can be purchased for cheaper so if you have a chain breaker or grinder then you can cut to length. Or go with a 55 tooth rear sprocket for 10% higher engine speed for a given over-the-ground-speed. Makes for a good torque multiplier and gives better control at low trail riding speeds.
 
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