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Found this at Lowes. The Teflon stuff is good. Wanted to try it until I change the original sprockets and chain. It's supposed to be completely non-stick. Since I ride mostly off-road it may be a good lube. Has anyone else tried this? DSCF0033.JPG
 

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Standard roller chains require constant cleaning and lubrication as well as regular adjustments. I have never found a suitable chain lubricant that did all things well. When lubricating the chain on the bike what you will find is most of it ends up on the bike and is a pain to clean off the wheels, spokes, guard, swing arm and underside of the fender.

The best lubricant I ever found was regular 30 weight oil when used this way. Remove the chain and clean it in diesel or kerosene. Allow it to hang and drip dry after wiping all residue off. Soak the chain for an hour in an oil bath and again wipe the excess off and allow it to hang over night so most of the oil drips off. You will still get overspray all over but not as much and you will be sure the inside rollers and posts got oiled. Washing the chain and getting most of the dirt out is as important as lubricating it.

The O and X ring chains perform so much better because they are sealed and keep most of the offending dirt out of the wear surfaces. A quick wipe and very light external lubrication to thwart surface rust is all that is required. Much the same as a sealed bearing that never requires lubrication. This is the very first thing I would change on any bike that is not delivered with a sealed chain.

GaryL
 
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The best lubricant I ever found was regular 30 weight oil when used this way.
GaryL
I absolutely agree 100% with everything you said except I think 140 wt gear oil better -- a lot less fling than 30 wt. -- for open non-sealed chains.

My experience with o-ring chains is very limited but in the past I have used WD-40 after cleaning and drying with kerosine.
 

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I absolutely agree 100% with everything you said except I think 140 wt gear oil better -- a lot less fling than 30 wt. -- for open non-sealed chains.

My experience with o-ring chains is very limited but in the past I have used WD-40 after cleaning and drying with kerosine.
I can agree the heavier gear oil might be a better choice but it takes forever to allow that thick stuff to drip off and a lot longer soaking in the bath for it to penetrate the inner rollers. Getting the dirt out is way more important than the final lube.

GaryL
 

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What about regular grease to lubricate the chain? Will it serve the purpose?
 

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we found that the most wear occurs on the sprockettooth face and roller surface just because of the sand up here is so fine it acts as an abrasif .and heawy lube just traps the dirt on the chain and sprocket just like valve grind compound. so up here we just try to keep chain clean and use a light lube to keep rust off.
 

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I can agree the heavier gear oil might be a better choice but it takes forever to allow that thick stuff to drip off and a lot longer soaking in the bath for it to penetrate the inner rollers. Getting the dirt out is way more important than the final lube.

GaryL

I've heard of people soaking the chains in gear lube that was warmed up in a pan to help it thin out and penetrate. Never tried it, I just use the spray on and fling off type.
 

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So , some folks take their open chain off and soak in Kerosene or whatever , then soak the chain in lube for an hour or better, then let it sit all night and then re-install......folks do this every 300--600 miles!......no thanks.
WD-40 is fine to use as a cleaner on an o-ring chain , then, lightly lube the chain , super sticky stuff attracts dirt. Oil and the like assist in removing the dirt / debris.....one advantage of an "auotmatic" chain oiler.
 

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"I never properly cared for any standard roller chain on any of my bikes"!

This is is the main issue. Another big truth is when you mix sand and gritt with oil you end up with a highly abrasive concoction that is guaranteed to wear things out just like valve grinding compound.

Keep your chain as clean as possible and have fun!

GaryL
 

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When I rode in the desert I used PJ1, only hosed the bike off if it had been in the silt or I was pulling the head or jug. Never kept a chain and sprockets over 10,000 miles, so, I didn't worry about it. With O-ring chain now days, I take it off the bike and lay it out on a piece of metal. I use WD-40 and some rags to soak and wipe it clean. Then I spray it down a few times with a dry lube for O-ring chains.
 

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Chains, sprockets and brake pads are all just Normal Wear items. The more you use them and the harshness of the elements you use them in dictates the life expectancy. All you are doing by cleaning and oiling is extending the life.

Ringed chains will last much longer even if you do nothing at all but the basic mechanics of sealing the grit out from the inside of each roller is where they really outperform standard chains. They are not maintenance free but they are an upgrade that pays you back handsomely in both longevity and lack of time necessary. If you ever went through the trouble of changing a front sprocket on a TW you will certainly want the best quality and longest lasting chain your money can buy. You need three O ring seals and a side cover gasket plus the front sprocket and a full afternoon to do the job. Just cleaning off the old cover gasket is a process in and of itself.

GaryL
 
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Champion Chain Lubricant from Walmart is all I use for any chain. apply when the chain is hot and it soaks in. Dries like wax. Waterproof, dust and grit do not stick, mud washes off with a water hose, and Seafoam DeepCreep dissolves it in a flash.
 

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I've heard about how awesome that DuPont Teflon stuff is. I just looked for, and bought, some chain lube for my new x-ring chain. These articles helped tremendously in making my choice.

Original Bike Spirits Chain Lube - this one seems to dry almost completely

DuPont Chain lube - good info on the DuPont Teflon stuff

That site seems to have some pretty good and thorough reviews.
 

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....... it takes forever to allow that thick stuff to drip off and a lot longer soaking in the bath for it to penetrate the inner rollers. Getting the dirt out is way more important than the final lube.

GaryL
I agree 100% but for me the extra time is worth the effort. I usually soak overnight and let drip for several hours. I use a coffee can and leave it in the sun to warm the oil which speeds things up.

I usually put a wet with kerosene chain in the heavy oil and I see black crud rising to the top as the oil displaces the kerosene that is behind the rollers. This kerosene thins the oil and has to be replaced every other time, or every third time if I am feeling lazy. When "changing" the gear oil I have noticed a very fine grit on the bottom of the can so even the soak in oil is doing some cleaning.

I have 25K miles on the chain. The teeth on the front sprocket are getting thin but are straight up and down -- no tsunami affect which I have been told is caused by a stretched chain.

As noted before, I have an o-ring chain on the shelf and look forward to the day I install it but for now I want to see how long I can make this one last.

Below is a very exciting picture of my chain soaking! If you look close you can see black streaks in the oil. Tony

Chain soaking.JPG
 

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I agree 100% but for me the extra time is worth the effort. I usually soak overnight and let drip for several hours. I use a coffee can and leave it in the sun to warm the oil which speeds things up.

I usually put a wet with kerosene chain in the heavy oil and I see black crud rising to the top as the oil displaces the kerosene that is behind the rollers. This kerosene thins the oil and has to be replaced every other time, or every third time if I am feeling lazy. When "changing" the gear oil I have noticed a very fine grit on the bottom of the can so even the soak in oil is doing some cleaning.

I have 25K miles on the chain. The teeth on the front sprocket are getting thin but are straight up and down -- no tsunami affect which I have been told is caused by a stretched chain.

As noted before, I have an o-ring chain on the shelf and look forward to the day I install it but for now I want to see how long I can make this one last.

Below is a very exciting picture of my chain soaking! If you look close you can see black streaks in the oil. Tony

View attachment 4874
Now that is what I call some good chain maintanance! I can see how a stock chain would last a long time with that routine. Too much extra work for me but I can appreciate your desire to get the most out of the chain.
 

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Some of you may have seen this already but this is how I lube my chain.http://tw200forum.com/forum/performance-customization/4834-homemade-chain-oiler.html

The oiler works great. I also switched both my TW's to o-ring chains. I got tired of the maintenance and constant adjustments. My 03 has had an o-ring chain and the oiler for 15,000 km now and I have only adjusted it a couple times. The sprockets are just fine although I switched the front 14tooth with a 15tooth last summer before my 3800km tour. The 15t helped the machine breath just a little easier at highway speeds.
 

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The entire concept of spending $30 more for a sealed O or X ring chain is freedom from maintenance. Ie; adjustments every few hundred miles and constant oiling/cleaning. I can applaud the ingenuity here but I have to say I really just want to install a good chain and then just forget about it for quite a while. I love a clean bike and hate the fling crap all over every part of my rear end. I want to be able to spray dirt and mud off and run a quick coat of surface oil on the chain to prevent surface rust and be done with it real quick and I am willing to pay a little more for that. With a standard roller chain I was adjusting, cleaning and oiling three times every 1,000 miles and with a sealed O or X chain I could do it once every 3,000 and it only took a few minutes compared to a few hours every time.

I don't have an issue with those here who insist upon running their stock BS chain until death do you part, have at it. If you enjoy adjusting your chain, cleaning your rim and stroking your spokes to clean the gunk off then who am I to intervene with your pleasures? A good chain just saves you time and effort and lasts a whole bunch longer and only costs a little bit more. Time to me is money but I am retired so time might have a bit more value to me these days, not enough left to be wasting it futzing around on a stupid chain.

GaryL
 
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