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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm trying to work up the courage to attempt replacing my stock chain with a DID X (I have the required size info somewhere).
My question:
Since the chain comes with a master link with clip all I have to do is remove the clip (watched several youtube vids), remove the master link, attach the new chain to the old one, thread it thru, install new master link, new o rings and clip (facing forward) and I should be done. Am I correct or out of my mind? Thank you all for your help.
 

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Sounds about right. Are the sprockets new enough that replacements aren't warranted? Worn sprockets can wear a new chain down kinda quick.
 

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If you feel good about it, go for it. Be sure to check the inner side of the sprocket as well. A little misalignment can cause it to wear on one side more than the other. Provided they looked like new I'd go ahead and reuse them too. Get the slack right once you're done. If you're getting the rear tire off the ground for the job that's good, but maybe break the axle nut loose beforehand so you can adjust the slack while it's up. If you're getting the stock amount of chain links then it shouldn't be too hard to get in the ballpark.
 

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Installing the DID VX chain is not as easy as you might think. When you put the tiny X rings on behind the outer plate the plate must be compressed enough so the E clip can seat in the groves. A Chain Tool Kit provides the vice type press for this and has various different attachments that will make this job simple. Without a chain tool kit then you must improvise and figure some other way to compress the plate and X rings far enough to find the E clip groves. Harbor Freight sells an inexpensive kit that will work fine.

GaryL
 

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In a pinch, I have used a set of vise grip pliers to pinch the outer plate down enough to compress the o-rings.
One pair can do the trick if you do each end a tad at the time with the pliers set right.
Two pair work better if you can do both ends at the same time.
If you have a pair narrow enough, perhaps you can do it between the pins.
 

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In a pinch, I have used a set of vise grip pliers to pinch the outer plate down enough to compress the o-rings.
One pair can do the trick if you do each end a tad at the time with the pliers set right.
Two pair work better if you can do both ends at the same time.
If you have a pair narrow enough, perhaps you can do it between the pins.
That's what I mean by "Improvise". Lots of ways to do the job if you have tools and know how to use them. A Chain tool kit just makes it so much easier.

GaryL
 

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I used a tiny rat-tail file to open up the side plate holes a couple of thousandths so I could press the plate on the other side by hand. Then a pair of needle nose pliers did the job with the O-rings in place. You could also wind some 320 grit sandpaper around a small nail. It doesn't take much but you do have to hold the side plate in a vise.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you all for the great advice. I’m gonna let my mechanic do it, hahaha I’m famous for screwing things up. Considering how I ride this is a once in a life time thing. Some things are worth paying for. Again, thank you gentlemen.
 

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This is the basic kit I have, not sure if it is the same brand or not but it will be the best $16 you ever spend for dealing with MC Chains.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Motorcycle-Bike-Chain-Breaker-Splitter-Link-Riveter-Riveting-Repair-Set-Tool-Kit/143368616699?epid=18019212099&hash=item21616f7afb:g:NMAAAOSwrBRa9ANL

This is the exact kit I have and it does it all up to 520 size chains.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Stockton-Tool-Company-P-N-28165-Chain-Breaker-Riveter-Tool-Kit-New-in-Box/323938081906?hash=item4b6c36dc72:g:IK4AAOSwiGRdl9n5

GaryL
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you all for the great advice. I’m gonna let my mechanic do it, hahaha I’m famous for screwing things up. Considering how I ride this is a once in a life time thing. Some things are worth paying for. Again, thank you gentlemen.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks Gary. I will consider it. Is there a college where I can learn how to use there tools? Haha I’m very aware of my shortcomings and that’s without even considering that my 74 yr old brain only works at barely 60% capacity. Again thank you.
 

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Thank you all for the great advice. I’m gonna let my mechanic do it, hahaha I’m famous for screwing things up. Considering how I ride this is a once in a life time thing. Some things are worth paying for. Again, thank you gentlemen.
I will agree with this idea. Lots of times and in some areas if you buy the chain at the shop and pay a little more for it they will install it for free or cheap. Considering you sprung the bucks for the best X ring chain my suggestion would be to do it all once and replace both front and rear sprockets that already have over 2,000 miles on them. New sprockets and a DID VX chain should easily last you over 10,000 miles and with little or no adjustments or serious cleaning. Just never use a high pressure spray that can and will blow the X rings out. Wax type chain spray lube is all you should ever need.

GaryL
 

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Thanks Gary. I will consider it. Is there a college where I can learn how to use there tools? Haha I’m very aware of my shortcomings and that’s without even considering that my 74 yr old brain only works at barely 60% capacity. Again thank you.
The instructions that came in my kit are all I ever needed. Chains with clip type master links are easy once you compress the plate and O or X rings. Chains that require the master link to be riveted are a little more complex but also easy with this tool kit.
I always buy the DID VX chains and I buy them longer just in case I have to add a few links when I change a rear sprocket to more teeth. Then I have to break or remove the extra links and save them for later and I also always purchase a couple extra master links with every chain I buy. You probably don't need any of this stuff if your mechanic will do it right for you and at a reasonable price. If you were here I would have your old chain off and the new one on in 10 minutes for free. Just a couple old farts playing with our TWs and tools while enjoying a beer.

GaryL
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The instructions that came in my kit are all I ever needed. Chains with clip type master links are easy once you compress the plate and O or X rings. Chains that require the master link to be riveted are a little more complex but also easy with this tool kit.
I always buy the DID VX chains and I buy them longer just in case I have to add a few links when I change a rear sprocket to more teeth. Then I have to break or remove the extra links and save them for later and I also always purchase a couple extra master links with every chain I buy. You probably don't need any of this stuff if your mechanic will do it right for you and at a reasonable price. If you were here I would have your old chain off and the new one on in 10 minutes for free. Just a couple old farts playing with our TWs and tools while enjoying a beer.

GaryL
Thank you Gary and everyone else.
I'm kinda looking at three option here:
1 leave well enough alone. After all there are members here who have run those chains for thousands of miles.
2 Buy the tools I need and attempt it myself.
3 Bring it to my mech and have him do both chain and sprockets for prob $200-300.

Decision time soon.
Again, thank you all.
 

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Option 4 - There are a lot of fellow forum members in your area that I am sure would be happy to help you with this job. It really is pretty simple to do and once you've seen it done, you would be able to help someone else in the future.

Hopefully, someone local will volunteer and offer you their assistance (Hint: Ronnydog, Jimbo, Tweaker, etc. . . . . . . . )
 

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Cerberus, very smart to know your limitations; it will save you money in the long run.
Excellent point jeepster! Not all TW owners are wrench heads and are not expected or required to be. Like Brian mentions above, find a local member who has the tools and ability if you don't have them. You could end up with a riding pal who can show you some other things and also some nice trails or rides that you never knew existed. Knowing how to do some basic adjustments is a good idea but there are many here who just want to ride and rely on a shop or the dealer to perform the maintenance.

GaryL
 
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