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So I decided to get a new chian for my bike. I went down to the Yamaha store and asked for the stock

chain replacement. They gave me an EK sport chain, while it was laying right beside the old chain you can

clearly see the old stock chain is much wider because the side plates are much thicker. I asked and the guy

why he told me that it was because different manufacturer, I asked if it was just as strong and he said it should

be. So I take it home and start measuring it. The side plates measure in at 1.5mm and the old stock

chain side plates are at 2mm. I am farily certain that this new EK chain is not up to par. So with

more research I found that there are heavy duty and light versions. So I ordered EK sport EX chain which

was supposed to have 2mm side plates. Which of course it does not the plates measure out at 1.8mm



So the question is am I making something out of nothing or is there somewhere that can provide a super duty

type 428 chain?



I am not finding very much information on the DID chain that came with the bike.



I'm not wishing to start O-ring vs Non O-ring chain discussion.



Thank you
 

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From my own research, I have found there to be several types of roller (regular) chain. One is a race chain that most motocross bikes would have. These chains are supposed to be just as strong, but are lighter weight so that the sprockets have less resistance and will go faster. Another type is a regular chain. This is your every day run of the mill chain. And the last type is a heavy duty (HD) chain. I bought the HD chain because I want it to last. You really need to look at the tensile strength of the chain. The tensile strength should justify what chain you should buy. Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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To be honest your making something out if nothing. Get a good name brand oring chain. The massive 16hp these things put out us no where near the power to hurt it as long as it adjusted properly. Make sure to change both sprockets when you replace you chain. Alot of guys run 520 chains on 160 plus RWH bikes. I personally get gold chains due to their corrosion inhititing propertys. Lube often I use wd-40 but do it every few days. Yeah I know that wd-40 isn't realy a lube but I have never had a rusty chain not snapped a chain on any bike I have owned. That equates to about 500,000 street/dirt miles
 

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To be honest your making something out if nothing. Get a good name brand oring chain. The massive 16hp these things put out us no where near the power to hurt it as long as it adjusted properly. Make sure to change both sprockets when you replace you chain. Alot of guys run 520 chains on 160 plus RWH bikes. I personally get gold chains due to their corrosion inhititing propertys. Lube often I use wd-40 but do it every few days. Yeah I know that wd-40 isn't realy a lube but I have never had a rusty chain not snapped a chain on any bike I have owned. That equates to about 500,000 street/dirt miles
 

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I don't know about the advice to get a good, name brand chain. The stock chain is DID, and is junk. In chains, you pretty much get what you pay for. Better chains are made of better quality steel with higher tensile strength. Better steel costs more money. A better quality steel can yield a chain of superior strength and wear resistance, even with thinner, lighter sideplates.



The best way to compare chains is by tensile strength--the higher the better.



If a chain is worn, the sprockets on which it has run is equally worn. Consider sprockets and chain a 3-piece set that wears together. Replacing any one piece of a worn set will result in rapid wear of the new piece to mach the wear on the retained components. The exception is when chains and/or sprockets are swapped regularly for different riding conditions. In that case, all components tend to wear together, surprisingly at about the same rate as a 3-piece set never swapped out.



EDIT: Most motorcycle chains are "pre-stretched". This results in one or two short adjustment intervals early in a chain's life, then extended intervals afterwards. Some people are lured into using industrial chains on motorcycles. Industrial chains are generally of sufficient tensile strength, but they are not pre-stretched and will require many quite frequent adjustments early in their lives. Schedule 40 industrial chain can be bought for under $15 for 10 feet, 240 links. Cheap, but stupid choice for a motorcycle.
 

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Hello, I put a new DID O-ring chain and 15 - 50 sprockets on my '06. The set has over 3000 miles on it now. I am like still waiting for it to need adjustment !

I use the Dupont Teflon spray lube as well.



best regards, mac
 

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sorry to bump this thread....years later, but has anybody tried changing the pitch of the chain and sprockets? i know on my gsxr i put a 520 kit on when stock was 525 and i knew guys who did the same with their 1k's. is there a lighter pitch you can go to on these as well? or any experience on that? thanks.

brandon
 

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I guess you could probably go with a 420 chain but I dont see any reason. It would be more of a hassle than its worth.
 

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wouldn't you just get sprockets and chain like normal? or is there something specific with the tw that makes it more of a pain in the butt?
 
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