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Hm, In my opinion, you should find out why your chain is derailing first, and correct the problem. If it's coming off, there "is" a problem. Not alined, kink in chain, to loose, even to tight can make a chain walk, or something else, bent spocket, whatever. Correct the problem, not by forcing it to stay with a tensioner. These bikes don't need a tensioner.
 

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Werloc,

I agree with you 100%! (for most normal TW's ;))

But here is what I am curious about. If you look closely at my chain at the top of the rear sprocket, you will see the small section of chain that I need to remove/replace when I change back and forth between my two rear sprockets. I am wondering if I could use this type of chain tensioner as sort of like a bicycle derailleuer, so I could switch between sprockets without adjusting the chain length. Just raise the rear wheel off the ground, rotate the wheel and manually push/pull the chain between sprockets and allow the tensioner to compensate for the change in chain slack.

What do you think, crazy or not?

100_5020.JPG
 

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Werloc,

I agree with you 100%! (for most normal TW's ;))

But here is what I am curious about. If you look closely at my chain at the top of the rear sprocket, you will see the small section of chain that I need to remove/replace when I change back and forth between my two rear sprockets. I am wondering if I could use this type of chain tensioner as sort of like a bicycle derailleuer, so I could switch between sprockets without adjusting the chain length. Just raise the rear wheel off the ground, rotate the wheel and manually push/pull the chain between sprockets and allow the tensioner to compensate for the change in chain slack.

What do you think, crazy or not?

View attachment 17470
Brian, I was speaking of or for a "stock" TW. I should have said that. But hey, I'm far from perfect. In the event of a "modded" bike like yours, or extended swingarms, etc, then adding a tensioner is a good idea. And, as for the OP'er, he shouldn't just add the tensioner to correct the problem. It should be looked at very well to see IF there is a problem, even if it to find that everything is fine, and maybe this was just a one time thing. Something could have gotten in there, making the chain derail. Then a tensioner is added just for piece of mind, and not using the tesioner as a way to correct the problem.
 

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Brian,
Other than having to shift the tensioner horizontally to maintain alignment with the chain, it should work. We have these applications in some of our construction equipment.
Mel
 

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Damn Brian your bike looks BadAss with that tire and dual sprocket setup. I think your little mule would work well pulling my potato plow. :notworthy:
 

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I have to tighten the chain every two rides.
As was said earlier, need a better chain! I've got 3,000+ miles on my O-ring chain and never have had to adjust it. It still appears to be with the same slack it had from the time of install. I've never lubed it or done any maint on it. It has been in the mud, water, dust, etc. I am careful to not hit it with the pressure washer, don't want to blow off O-rings or blow the lube out of it. The best upgrade for a TW IMO!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hello Brian,

It can be purchased on Amazon for under $30.
Universal Aluminum Adjuster Chain Tensioner Tool Roller Motocross for Kawasaki.

Amazon.com: Universal Aluminum Adjuster Chain Tensioner Tool Roller Motocross for Kawasaki: Automotive
Two years of riding and 9 thousand miles, my chain has only come off due to it being too loose. It only has to happen once and you will remember it forever if you get stuck in the woods far away from home. During 9000 miles and I have replaced 4 front sprockets, 4 chains and 2 rear sprockets. I now carry and extra chain and chain cutters in my TW200 tool bag. I ride primarily in first and second gear. I suspect I have many more engine miles on my TW200 than actual odometer miles which may explain the worn out chains and sprocket.
 

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If you ride with the correct chain slack, you'll not have a problem with a chain that comes off.
I had only 2 times in 16 years this problem.
The first time, I think it was in the first year, I haven't checked the chain slack for a long time.
And the second time I was on a 3h hare scramble. I've used a longer rear shock and the chain slack had to be bigger. Now I am using a chain guide of a Honda CR with a custom made bracket.

But no one needs something like this, if you check the chain slack.

~2200 miles per chain, wow, this is very low.
Do you buy the cheapest available chain and do you had never lubed the chain???????

In the past (as teenager) I've bough the lowest priced Yamaha chain kit.
And I was very lazy, I've only sometimes lubed the chain.
Result of my brutishness/laziness:
3000 km (~1900 miles) -->> cheapest Yamaha chain kit
6000 km (~3800 miles) -->> next better Yamaha chain kit


If fact:
Spend some time to service your chain (clean and lube) and buy a quality chain. Than you'll have a long mileage.
The best chains for street and offroad rides are Motocross chains (ex. RK 428MX or 428MXZ).
And for only streed riders are X-, O- or XW-chains the best choice (ex. RK 428XSO or 428GXW).
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I am curious -- why? That is really poor performance.
I believe the problem is how I ride and where I ride. I accelerate and brake with the engine constantly. My brakes on the bike are still good. This back-and-forth motion on the chain seems to wear things out quickly. TW 200 is two years old and I buy the same quality products as my friends. I lubricate my chain every ride and adjusted it every two rides. I ride two or three hours every other day. I rinse off my bike every ride but it still looks like a pig in mud. I even made special mudguards for the front and rear wheels to keep the mud away from the engine. I have a friend who is a professional motorcycle mechanic and he says it's just me. I am planning on replacing the clutch plates this winter and bearings in the steering wheel column. I love riding but I'm obviously not very good at it. image.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for the advice. I really appreciate it. I've only been riding two years and have a lot to learn. I am seriously considering buying a good O-ring chain. Please see my response on this page from another buddy.
 

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I know the TWs dont need them but chains will always last longer if they ALWAYS have the correct tension on them. The only time ours have the correct tension is when its just sitting there and you just adjusted it. At all other times the tension is at some compromise point. Sitting on it and riding it the swing arm moves up and down, as it does the chain gets tighter and looser. With a tensioner the chain should remain at the same tension no matter what.
 

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Looking at it I just see something that the next rock is going to hit. Maybe for street riding I can see this as a good fit. But the offroading I do in some rocky areas it's not going to last long. Look at Fred's Canyon ride video, there's no way that that thing lasts hanging down there.
 

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I got my tensioner today.

100_5065.JPG

I know that it is way too soon to say for sure, but after a quick test fitting I think that I may actually be able to make this thing work.

100_5078.JPG

(I knew that I should have ordered the clear anodized one since it looks like I will need to do some mods to it, but the black one just looked so much cooler :))
 
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