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Did an oil and filter change on my TW this weekend. (did the oil and filter on my V-Star too)
For the TW200, I used a quart of Yamalube Synthetic 15W-50, along with a new stock Yamaha filter. That quart of oil cost me $18.95 from my dealer, it must come from unicorns or something. My usual oil is Rotella T6, but I wanted to use the Yamalube to just get rid of that quart. Got the bike warm, actually took off the skid plate, then rode it to the car wash and powerwashed as much of the accumulated mud off the bike as I could, and saying powerwashed is using the term "power" loosely, they must keep that set at less than 500psi. After getting back to my garage, I removed the drain plug and let it drain for a while, then stood it upright for a few seconds and let it drain a bit more. Ended up doing that about 8 or 10 times before it stopped draining completely. Put in the quart and that got the level up into the glass, so that's all I put in. I know it's supposed to take a bit more than a quart, but I'll give it a few rides and check it again. The bike feels great, shifts were never a problem, but I can feel the difference with the new oil, each gear change just snicks into the next gear effortlessly.
Interestingly, the O-ring that goes around the allen-head drain bolt on the oil filter cover seemed to be missing. I could have dropped it, and the oil catch pan was under the bike when I was taking the filter cover off, but I looked in the oil and didn't find it. I don't believe I would have left that out at the last oil change, but I can't find it, so maybe I did. Nothing leaked, so that cover must fit quite well even without the O-ring. Luckily, in the package of O-rings that came with the filter for my V-Star, there was an O-ring that worked perfectly for the TW. I even rotated those chain tensioning cams to bring my chain back into specifications. I am going to have to take the time to clean and relube that chain though, it definitely needs it.
I'm a big fan of bikes that only require minimal maintenance, since I'd much rather ride than wrench, and the TW is a great fit for that.
 

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I didn't know there was an oring on that allen bolt. I've changed mine about 7 times in 3000 miles. I will have to look at that on the next oil change. I will also try some of that magic oil you speak of too. My shifter is getting clunky.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Rotella T6 has been, and will once again be my go-to oil for my bikes. I bought the Yamalube a while back when visiting the dealer, and didn't realize the price until he had already rang it up. It's been sitting like a trophy on the shelf in my garage, but lately it felt like it was laughing at me.
The Yamalube is ridiculously too expensive, and I think the T6 is as good or better, plus it's about $20/gallon at Walmart, so you get 400% more oil for your money.
My V-Star has the Rotella T6 in it, no complaints.
 

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I have posted this before. When I tried Rotella T-6 in my two TW's the clutches in both bikes started slipping. Any kind of power shift and I would have to back off on the throttle for the clutch to grab. For me that was unacceptable.

The silver lining to this experience was it forced me to get new clutches and I chose the Barnett Kevlar Clutch. Other than extremely minimal sticking at start up after sitting for a few days they work perfectly. Smooth engagement, lock up solidly, no chatter or slippage. The only down side is they cost twice as much but they are worth it!
 

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Elime, that is weird as there is really nothing in Rotella that would make a clutch slip. Regular 15W40 has 1 PPM of moly (Moly is the ingredient blamed for wet clutch woes) or less, Some moto specific oils have quite a bit more than that. I can only surmise that your clutch plates and or springs must have been nearing their life expectancy. I've never personally had an issue using Rotella and the 15w40/5w40 flavors do meet Jaso MA requirements. I use 10W30 Rotella in my Honda's without issue and that does not carry a Jaso MA rating but it also has virtually no moly. The Barnett plates are certainly a step up from stock. Did you upgrade the springs?
 

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I've always used Rotella T4 conventional oil. Also marketed as diesel engine oil. The loads on a diesel are much harsher than most engines and holds up to the sheer forces on the gears and clutch plates without breaking down. My oil seems to stay cleaner than other oils I've used. I'm assuming because there's less wear inside taking place. My clutches all work perfectly, shifting is smooth and positive, and the motor temps stay well within operating range.
Just my experience. 10-30 winter, 15-40 summer. (But frankly, I don't think it matters much. 15-40 year round is plenty good for riding weather.)
 
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Ski Pro you are correct. I just looked at my manual and 15W40 is good from 30°F-110°F so at least for this old gurly-man, it would be in riding season temp. range year around cause if its under 50°, I'm taking my truck :LOL:. You just can't beat the price/value of this oil (Autozone sells it around here for about $15.00 a gallon. I also use it in the primary side of my Harley and it works well for that.
 

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I have heard of many people using Rotella oil successfully. I can only say what my experience has been. If it had happened on only one TW I would say the clutch was about to go out and it was only a coincidence but on both TW's that makes me nervous about trying Rotella again. So after changing the clutches I went back to Mobil 1 full synthetic oil in one TW and whatever full or semi synthetic is on sale in the other TW.

I used Barnett springs. I had previously upgraded to Versah (?) springs. The Barnett and Versah springs seemed about the same. They are both much better than stock springs.
 

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I've said it before and I'll say it again...Rotella T6 is an awesome oil.
But in any of my bikes, it made the engine and/or valve train noisier than normal and therefore I stopped using it. Don't know why others can use it with no side-effects, but I'm happy for them if they can because it is GREAT oil.
 

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Ok, I have a really stupid question..... A lifelong friend of mine is a high-end race engine builder, his work on heads alone have been utilized by Hendrick, Petty, etc.... We were discussing oil a while back, and he swore by utilizing oil that is rather "era-correct" on any mass produced, low HP engine. In other words, your 66 289 in your Mustang, would be better off with the older stuff, rather than the all new, full synth, 12 dollar a qt stuff. Newer mass produced engines have far tighter tolerences, in search of doing more with far less. I've never been steered wrong by him, and he's built two engines for me in project cars I've put together in the past. My point is, since the TW engine is essentially based off decades old tech, would it qualify as one that "ancient" oil could be actually beneficial to it's life? Not trying to start a bitch session, just was curious to everyone's opinions. Thanks for your input
 

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The Japanese are know for their fine tolerance engines so IMHO as long as the oil your using is rated for the specs of the TW engine and Wet Clutch your fine.

In older Detroit engines, if it were not a new rebuilt but say your dad's old truck then keep using the old Dino oil, the newer Synth will make it leak as it cleans out the old deposits around seals.

If it were a new rebuild I would run Synth of the proper weight for what then engine was being used for and the environment it was in, ergo not using 20W50 in 10F cold.

After my TW break in I put in Mobile 1 H4.

Others will chime in I'm sure but this is my H.O. based on my experience.
 

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Ok, I have a really stupid question..... A lifelong friend of mine is a high-end race engine builder, his work on heads alone have been utilized by Hendrick, Petty, etc.... We were discussing oil a while back, and he swore by utilizing oil that is rather "era-correct" on any mass produced, low HP engine. In other words, your 66 289 in your Mustang, would be better off with the older stuff, rather than the all new, full synth, 12 dollar a qt stuff. Newer mass produced engines have far tighter tolerences, in search of doing more with far less. I've never been steered wrong by him, and he's built two engines for me in project cars I've put together in the past. My point is, since the TW engine is essentially based off decades old tech, would it qualify as one that "ancient" oil could be actually beneficial to it's life? Not trying to start a bitch session, just was curious to everyone's opinions. Thanks for your input
Your friend is somewhat correct. The older "car" engines do not do well on the new oil. The new cars have roller lifters or other similar items on the valve train to reduce friction and such for gas mileage. The older engines had lifters on the cam and rockers pushing straight on the valve stems. Lots of friction. If you drive an old before 1986 car, you will literally wear the cam lobes off if you run new type oil. By new I mean. ..go to the store, buy a quart of name brand 10w 30 dino oil. It wont happen quickly but like 30,000 miles. Ask me how I know. 1985 Chevy truck. 3 cam lobes wore down. You will have to run a diesel type oil to get the ingredients to stop cam wear. I might be wrong but I think Rotella changed their formula. Not sure it has the stuff in it anymore. Their are additives you can buy to bring the oil up to the old standards. I just run yamalube in the TW so I don't have to worry.
 

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Your friend is somewhat correct. The older "car" engines do not do well on the new oil. The new cars have roller lifters or other similar items on the valve train to reduce friction and such for gas mileage. The older engines had lifters on the cam and rockers pushing straight on the valve stems. Lots of friction. If you drive an old before 1986 car, you will literally wear the cam lobes off if you run new type oil. By new I mean. ..go to the store, buy a quart of name brand 10w 30 dino oil. It wont happen quickly but like 30,000 miles. Ask me how I know. 1985 Chevy truck. 3 cam lobes wore down. You will have to run a diesel type oil to get the ingredients to stop cam wear. I might be wrong but I think Rotella changed their formula. Not sure it has the stuff in it anymore. Their are additives you can buy to bring the oil up to the old standards. I just run yamalube in the TW so I don't have to worry.
Well, you did say CHEVY so......

Or it could have been Prez T's fault. :sneaky:
 
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