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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Removing my stocker with 800 miles on it. Going to O-Ring. Breaking a 130 link chain down to 122. Seams pretty self explanatory.

Anything tricky or does anyone want to toss some tips out to me?

Thanks
 

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Don't use vise grips to squeeze the master link if you can help it. Buy the $14.00 dollar tool on Amazon to do it. It is very difficult to squish the links "side plate" on with the o-rings under it and get the clip on.. 10 times harder or more than a regular link. It fights you..




Removing my stocker with 800 miles on it. Going to O-Ring. Breaking a 130 link chain down to 122. Seams pretty self explanatory.

Anything tricky or does anyone want to toss some tips out to me?

Thanks
 

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Planning on just hooking the two together and pulling the old one off the front sprocket and running the new one around?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

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it should hang pretty straight on the bottom, but be able to push the bottom leg/wheel return side of the chain down no more than 1"...correct? 122 links
Read the manual.. ;)
Chain Slack.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
ended up figuring out that since my bike is set in the stock position on chain tension 122 links is just tight enough to make putting on the master slightly difficult.

Tips I have for newbies other than the ones above (everyone probably already knows these...)

1) use a small flathead screwdriver to slide the old master link clip up and the new one down
2) use a small set of needle nose pliers to hold the two ends of the chain together while pushing the master link in from the back side
3) wash and dry your bike after your done, but before you grease the new chain
4) keep the links you break off as a spare for trial repairs. I am keeping 2-3 master links in my trail bag along with my extra 10 links, and chain break tool
5) a stand that lifts both sides of the bike's rear end, like this one, made my life easier
 

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John,

I would like to just add a few comments/alternatives to your tips (in red).

Tips I have for newbies other than the ones above (everyone probably already knows these...)

0) Remove your chain guard. It is only two bolts and allows much easier access to the chain and sprocket.
1) use a small flathead screwdriver to slide the old master link clip up and the new one down
2) use a small set of needle nose pliers to hold the two ends of the chain together while pushing the master link in from the back side If you position the ends of the chain at approximately the 2:00 o'clock position on your rear sprocket as shown in the picture below, they will stay in position by themselves and allow you to use both hands to remove/replace the master link. It also helps to put your bike into gear to prevent the rear wheel from turning.
3) wash and dry your bike after your done, but before you grease the new chain I would suggest washing and drying your bike before tackling this job. Makes the job less messy and allows you to add whatever lubricant you use while your bike is still on the stand.
4) keep the links you break off as a spare for trial repairs. I am keeping 2-3 master links in my trail bag along with my extra 10 links, and chain break tool
5) a stand that lifts both sides of the bike's rear end, like this one, made my life easier

I hope this is helpful,

Brian

100_5091.JPG
 

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ended up figuring out that since my bike is set in the stock position on chain tension 122 links is just tight enough to make putting on the master slightly difficult.

Tips I have for newbies other than the ones above (everyone probably already knows these...)

1) use a small flathead screwdriver to slide the old master link clip up and the new one down
2) use a small set of needle nose pliers to hold the two ends of the chain together while pushing the master link in from the back side
3) wash and dry your bike after your done, but before you grease the new chain
4) keep the links you break off as a spare for trial repairs. I am keeping 2-3 master links in my trail bag along with my extra 10 links, and chain break tool
5) a stand that lifts both sides of the bike's rear end, like this one, made my life easier
thanks for the link on the harborfreight stand.....
 

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thanks for the link on the harborfreight stand.....
Just be aware that the Harbor Freight stand in the referenced link requires swingarm spools (or equivalent) which the stock TW swingarm doesn't have.



I have these home made "spools" on my bike which make this type of rear stand a real joy to use.

 
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