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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to change my 49 tooth rear sprocket (for a 47 or 45, I can't decide) but I wonder if I can just change the rear sprocket without changing the front one and without changing the O-ring chain? I know it's best to change everything at once but the current sprockets and chain were changed by the last owner and they were used for 620 miles only. It is too late to change the rear sprocket ?

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It's perfectly fine to change only one sprocket if you want to, especially with the low use/mileage you mention. The only issue you may have is if you change to a smaller sprocket your chain may be too long. Probably not too long if you change from 49 to 47 but you will most likely need to shorten (remove some chain links) if you change to 45. You won't know for sure until you change the sprocket and "test fit" it to make sure you have the proper length chain.
 

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Simply change your front sprocket to a 15 it’s cheap fast and you won’t have to cut your chain
One front tooth equates to aprx 3 1/2 rear teeth and you can get front sprockets from 11 to 16 tooth 14 being stock

I run a 16 tooth front from PBI sprockets I can still use the stock chain length and can change to any other front sprocket as a trail side swap
 

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One might wish to decide how much of a gearing change one wishes to achieve. The change in ratios discussed so far range from a bit over 4% to a bit ovr 14%. Be aware that while a 16 tooth will have engine operating at about 14% less rpm for any given over the ground speed it conversely will not make the bike go 14% faster. Not sure if even the 4% gearing change of a 47 vs 49 tooth rear sprocket will permit a 4% increase in top speed. Wind resistance, or drag, increases with the velocity squared and unfortunately the TW power output does not even increase linearly approaching the redline.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you all for suggestions!
About the choice of sprocket (47T or 45T), I read a lot of different points of view. My goal is to ride 95% on the road without hills (city) and I weigh 220 pounds. I would like to be able to ride at 60 mph without the rpm being too high... Is it realistic ?
 

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Thank you all for suggestions!
About the choice of sprocket (47T or 45T), I read a lot of different points of view. My goal is to ride 95% on the road without hills (city) and I weigh 220 pounds. I would like to be able to ride at 60 mph without the rpm being too high... Is it realistic ?
Im sorta the same, I went with a 47 but wish id went 45 , jusayun
 

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Alain, you already have a 47 tooth installed! I can tell from your picture. It is a JT Sprocket. The model number is stamped on it: JTR1842-47. JT is the manufacturer. R=Rear, and that 47 means it's a 47 tooth version of their model 1842. The 49 on there under the logo denotes that it is made from C49 High Carbon Steel. You better count 'em up!

Btw, for the record, none of the options, including the stock 50 tooth, would make your engine rpms "too high". Stop worrying. Just ride it! Put some miles on, or KMs since yoor a canuck, eh? :) After a few thousand, re-evaluate, but until then get you some smiles! As a noob, invest the money in good riding gear or a motorcycle safety course when the thaw comes. You won't regret it. Best-
 

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Alain, you already have a 47 tooth installed! I can tell from your picture. It is a JT Sprocket. The model number is stamped on it: JTR1842-47. JT is the manufacturer. R=Rear, and that 47 means it's a 47 tooth version of their model 1842. The 49 on there under the logo denotes that it is made from C49 High Carbon Steel. You better count 'em up!

Btw, for the record, none of the options, including the stock 50 tooth, would make your engine rpms "too high". Stop worrying. Just ride it! Put some miles on, or KMs since yoor a canuck, eh? :) After a few thousand, re-evaluate, but until then get you some smiles! As a noob, invest the money in good riding gear or a motorcycle safety course when the thaw comes. You won't regret it. Best-
Man, you must have a nice hi-res computer/laptop screen, or a large screen, and/or good eyesight!!

I do run my zoom around 80% on my 15.5" screen, but once I zoomed in....I could see it a bit better, just the clarity wasn't the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Alain, you already have a 47 tooth installed! I can tell from your picture. It is a JT Sprocket. The model number is stamped on it: JTR1842-47. JT is the manufacturer. R=Rear, and that 47 means it's a 47 tooth version of their model 1842. The 49 on there under the logo denotes that it is made from C49 High Carbon Steel.
Wow, you have a great sense of observation! I just counted and indeed, I have a 47 tooth sprocket. The guy who sold me the bike this fall told me he had changed the rear sprocket for a 49 and it was written 49 on it, that seemed logical to me! Thank you, I would have looked really stupid to change my 47 for another 47!
 

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I would like to change my 49 tooth rear sprocket (for a 47 or 45, I can't decide) but I wonder if I can just change the rear sprocket without changing the front one and without changing the O-ring chain? I know it's best to change everything at once but the current sprockets and chain were changed by the last owner and they were used for 620 miles only. It is too late to change the rear sprocket ?

View attachment 233394
Here's a link to a calculator that will help you figure it all out Gearing Commander - Motorcycle Speed and Drive Train Calculator v7
 

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Nah dude, you thought you had a 49 so buying another 47 would have made a difference. A huge difference!

Placebo affect, ya know. ;)

Seriously though stick with your 14/47, ride and enjoy. 45 or taller gearing isn't worth it and probably does the engine more harm than good despite allowing it to run a little slower. My bike bogged down big time especially 5th gear with 14/44 and 14/45. 14/47 was by far my favorite gearing for the 99% street riding I did. Also note I was only 130 pounds back when I had my TW, the tall gearing still totally sucked.
 
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