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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Who changes their own tires -- as in pry them off and on? And if you pay to have it done what is the going rate where you are?

I change my own and balance them too. The last time I paid for the service, including balancing, I paid $24 / wheel.
 

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I change my own, and balance them too, always have.
 

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was going to but could not get mine off so I paid 30.00 to have them done, I was in a hurry and did not have the proper tools at the time. I did not have mine balanced and haven't had a issue. Had mine up to 65 felt smooth so? should I balance mine? or do you only do it if there is a vibration.
 

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I do my own now, but when I had it done the cost was in the range other's here have mentioned. Problem I had was the shops wouldn't mount the 244 on my front rim. Secondly, I wanted (needed) to know how to take the tires on and off "just in case". After I found how easy it was, I now do all myself.

66, probably don't need to worry about balance if you don't feel vibration.
 
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you can use tire irons but you can also use tie down straps....do a youtube search for motorcycle tire changing. get the longest tire irons you can, leverage is the key there
 

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I've always changed my own tires. On the ground holding the bead in the recess with my knees using 7 inch tire irons. If it's too hard to lever over with 7" tire irons, , I take smaller bites. Keeping the bead in the bottom of the recess helps considerably. Taking too large bites and using too much force can damage the thin TW rims and even the bead.
 

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Thanks for posting this rurlndum. I'll be rotating or switching directions on my Shinko 244 soon so this came at a handy time. I use 3 tire irons to remove and install the tire, but this fellow shows it can be easily done with 2 irons. I did learn a couple cool tricks/tips than I didn't know before.

1st is using an old car/truck wheel rim as a workbase for motorcycle tires. I have an old one around which I'll use.

2nd is when removing the second bead, slipping the tire partially on the other side and then dropping or slipping the motorcycle rim into the drop center. I always fight the tire at this point and his method works really well. I may have done this by accident in the past, but now I'll actually be trying to do it.

Thanks again for posting.

P.S. He has a nice looking kitty!
 

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great video, I am a little concerned about scratching the black rims, (yes i know they will have and get scratches from riding but I don't want to put any on when changing the tire)

Insight appreciated.
 

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"when removing the second bead, slipping the tire partially on the other side and then dropping or slipping the motorcycle rim into the drop center"

That is a cool trick.
 

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This has been on the forum before. Scroll down for video

The Best How to Change a Motorcycle Tire Video
Well now I'm really really confused. Perhaps somebody can explain. Put the tire irons in 180 degrees opposite the rim lock? It would seem, to me at least, that the stem of the rim lock would still present at least a little bit of obstruction to the rim being down in the recess.

But the area 180 degrees opposite the rim lock has no obstruction. So why not place the irons at or near the rim lock so the rim can be more fully down in the recess. That's what I have always done. (with only two irons-and there was a reason for that also)
 

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I have only done it once on my Hayabusa. Was a pain in the butt. I am hoping when it comes time to do the TW tires it will be much easier!

-THE MENACE
 

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Haha, no I used an old lincoln stick welder on that one.
 
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