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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone else in to old bikes from the 60's, 70's. That's the direction I'm going. I have the 2013 TW and sold all the rest. Thinking about a Honda 750 or Suzuki 750GS to start with. I don't intend to amass a "collection". I guess I just want to walk (ride) down memory lane in retirement. As I recall I had more fun on these smaller displacement bikes than I ever have on the Harley's or Goldwings I've owned.

Thoughts? Comments? Photos?
 

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A friend of mine use to let me ride his late 60s Yamaha 650 that bike was a blast. I rode all over the Mississippi Gulf Coast
 

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I am very slowly restoring a '73 CB500 Four which is older than I am.
I consider it school-fees as I am learning a lot about mechanics and electrics and motorcycles and budgeting, and patience and...

Classics are a lot of fun, and with added nostalgia, I can't believe you'll go wrong. Keep us posted on what you end up picking up.
 

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I own a 1981 seca 750, but it's just be stored without running for 8 years..... I think I could sell now if offered something more than a few hundred. OMM.
 

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I love the Classis but lean heavily toward the English brands, Triumph, Norton, Royal Enfield of the early 1970s. When I see a well preserved or completely refurbished Norton Commando my heart skips a beat and I want it. Back in 1972 I purchased one of the first Kawasaki 750 H2 triples in these parts and loved the raw speed that engine produced but it was a terrible bike over all. The Jap bikes seemed to concern themselves with engines but left a lot to be desired in handling. Oddly, Harley's do nothing for me and never have.

GaryL
 

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Nice thing about the old single cam CB'S is there are plenty of parts sources out there. Dime City Cycles here in Florida has all kinds of goodies to make rebuilds easy.
 

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I love the Classis but lean heavily toward the English brands, Triumph, Norton, Royal Enfield of the early 1970s. When I see a well preserved or completely refurbished Norton Commando my heart skips a beat and I want it. Back in 1972 I purchased one of the first Kawasaki 750 H2 triples in these parts and loved the raw speed that engine produced but it was a terrible bike over all. The Jap bikes seemed to concern themselves with engines but left a lot to be desired in handling. Oddly, Harley's do nothing for me and never have.

GaryL
I had the opportunity to ride a early 70s Norton in 1977 I was in the Air Force in Biloxi and a friend need to use my 55 Chevy to go home for the weekend. I rode his Norton all weekend. Very cool bike.
 

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In my old, senile and very feeble opinion I think that the old Triumphs, BSAs, and Nortons are some of the true classics. The Japanese bikes not so much even though they were excellent machines. If my old Norton was not leaking oil it just meant that all the oil had already leaked out. At the young and tender age of 70 I am still in lust for a 650 Triumph. In addition to my TW of course.

triumph.jpeg
 

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In my old, senile and very feeble opinion I think that the old Triumphs, BSAs, and Nortons are some of the true classics. The Japanese bikes not so much even though they were excellent machines. If my old Norton was not leaking oil it just meant that all the oil had already leaked out. At the young and tender age of 70 I am still in lust for a 650 Triumph. In addition to my TW of course.

View attachment 10390
See post 8 in this thread. It's the closest I got to having a Triumph years ago.

http://tw200forum.com/forum/off-topic/8389-all-started-here.html

There are some great pics of bikes and some of our members there also you might enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Oh I can be a bit fickle but for now I'd like a mid 70's Honda 750. The Honda 750 was named one of the top three most important bikes ever made. The reason I like the Jap bikes, especially Honda, is because it was Dr. Honda's genius that brought motorcycling in to the mainstream. With the 60's Cubs and 100's he and his advertising campaign of "you meet the nicest people on a Honda" civilized motorcycling. It encouraged average folks to give two wheel transportation a try. Motorcycles were no longer the exclusive province of "bad boys" and Hell's Angels. Anyone remember the episode of the "Dick Vandyke Show" when Rob bought and rode a bike (a Honda 100 I believe) with a helmet and leather jacket? I think there was a big rose on the back of his leather.

The Brit bikes were important to American motorcycling, undeniably, but IMO Honda opened up peoples hearts and minds to the idea of fun on two wheels. As in the Beach Boys famous tune.

I think the Honda Nighthawk 750 was the best general use utility bike ever produced
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Retro bikes must have a market. Kawasaki came out with the W650 in the early 2000's. Now Honda has the new CB 1000 in it's second year of production. The TU is retro styled. I'd say the Triumph T-100 is retro looking and the Ural and Enfield certainly rely on past styling Q's. Must be a market for them.
 

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In my old, senile and very feeble opinion I think that the old Triumphs, BSAs, and Nortons are some of the true classics. The Japanese bikes not so much even though they were excellent machines. If my old Norton was not leaking oil it just meant that all the oil had already leaked out. At the young and tender age of 70 I am still in lust for a 650 Triumph. In addition to my TW of course.

View attachment 10390
How true it was that the English bikes and even the older Harley's all left puddles under them. I think mostly because of gasket technology much the same as our TWs that develop base gasket leaks. I remember well replacing the gaskets on my Norton and paying meticulous attention to getting them right only to find a puddle under the bike the next morning. As much as I loved that bike that is the underlying reason I sold it and bought the Kawasaki H2.

GaryL
 

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I would also kill for a classic Triumph!
They are more rare than even hens' teeth out here.

Love the old Brits, but the chance of finding them here is really miniscule, but I keep an eye out regardless. ;)
 

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I had two Triumph 650's, a '68 and a '71. Best wheelie bikes ever, but wherever I went my hands always smelled like gasoline from priming those carbs. I miss that.
 
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