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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
this works the best fast easy and will not remove the seasoning.
 

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Sacrilege. Any good multi-generational hillbilly farm boy knows that the only way to clean heirloom seasoned cast iron is to sprinkle in coarse salt and gently scrub with an old clean dry rag. No water, no soap, just salt.
When my grandmother passed away my mom got her old and very well seasoned cast iron black skillet. GM was a fantastic cook and mom not so much. The first thing my mother did was scrub the skillet with brillo pads right down to bare metal. The next day the pan was rusty and nasty looking. 50 years of seasoning went down the drain and a pork chop never tasted the same as when grandma cooked them. Pretty sure all that GM ever did with that skillet was to wipe out the grease after cooking with it.

GaryL
 

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I use hot water and a plastic mesh scrubby. It's the best thing I've found.
 

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GaryL, now THAT'S a sad story! Hope you snagged the CI back, and restored them back to their former glory!
Lodge sells that stainless steel scrubber, but I think it's unnessary. We collect and use CI here, and all we do is soak
the crud if need be in water (hot or cold) and scrape it out with a hard plastic scraper sold in kitchen stores.
Soaking in water doesn't hurt it one iota.
Dry, then oil. Simple...
RicklesssS in Oregon
 

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soak
the crud if need be in water (hot or cold) and scrape it out with a hard plastic scraper sold in kitchen stores.
Soaking in water doesn't hurt it one iota.
My Ma and several generations of grannies (if they were still around) would rap your knuckles with a wooden spoon if you did that to their pans. :D That water leaches accumulated flavor from the pan...the very thing that makes food from a very old, well cared for pan taste so good.
 

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My Ma and several generations of grannies (if they were still around would rap your knuckles with a wooden spoon if you did that to their pans). :D That water leaches accumulated flavor from the pan...the very thing that makes food from a very old, well cared for pan taste so good.
Agree! My GM went through a big process to season both her CI skillets and the old Dutch Oven pot. I believe she started the process in a covered BBQ grill and a Hickory wood fire with Crisco and just let it burn.

GaryL
 

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I'll have to try the salt-cleaning. Always just wiped it out and if the stuck on bits wouldn't come free poured in a bit of boiling water. Thanks Borneo!
 

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Discussion Starter #11

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Acidic foods like tomatoes, beans, and certain sauces can damage seasoning, and should be avoided until the seasoning is well-established.
That is from the official Lodge Cookware website. Ma and granny would say stay away forever. They didn't want any of their hard won seasoning removed, even after it became well established.

I know it may not be obvious, but those accumulated years of seasoning from a variety of foods and greases impart a special flavor to the food way beyond the added ingredients. It just does.

So, until some water washing, tomato cooking, iron chef serves me a plate of venison hash or fried rabbit in white better than mom and granny could do it...I'm wiping like Gary said, and if it has a little stubborn bit I'm scrubbing lightly with a bit of salt like I been taught.

Pfft....:D
 

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Very nice Flathats! When I first met my wife we were both recovering from legal bills and nasty divorces. I ended up with the house me and the X had just bought plus the mortgage and all the debts and she got everything else but my tools. My then GF and now wife ran real fast from her X with a few boxes of her clothes and not much else and was living in her moms basement on a cott alongside the furnace. Lawn chairs in my living room and a brand new 19 inch TV sitting on 2 five gallon buckets with a real nice brand new kitchen and just a few odd pots and pans. GF/wife is Italian and a fantastic cook who is as home in a kitchen as I am in a shop but she needed tools to get right to my heart.

Fast forward and I took her right to the best store in town and we bought everything any gal who cooks would want not to mention a guy who loves good cooking and food. I think I dropped a couple grand that day on a very complete set of Calphalon cookware and the best set of Wustoff cuttlery knives we could find. Smooth move for this Ex-lax and we/she still loves her stuff to this very day 28 years later and I never once looked back. She has added 6 cast iron pans and pots from grandmother hand downs and all I can say is the food she makes in them is out of this world and better than in any fancy restaurant we ever go to. I could have saved my cash, bought some real old well used cast iron cookware and bought a nice TW with the leftover money. The heavy aluminum Calphalon stuff is real nice but the food cooked in the CI pots and pans blows all the other pots and pans right out of the park. If you have never had a pot roast cooked in a 100 year old cast iron dutch oven or my favorite corned beef, cabbage and boiled potatoes from the same pot then you have never really tasted great cooking. I think her big cast iron fry pan must weigh close to 10 pounds empty and could be classified as a deadly weapon but it sure does bring life to good food. At first she hated all the CI pans just because they were so heavy but once she learned how simple they are to keep clean and leave the seasoning in plus getting thew taste and all the compliments she now uses them all the time and has the Calphalon fry pans hanging in the back of her rack.

Some might think this is Off Topic for a MC forum but the info above is priceless for those who love good food and those who love to cook it. Venison back straps with onions, garlic and butter cooked in a big and well seasoned CI fry pan just can't be beat except there is never enough of them. My wife has one for making corn bread that has dividers like a pie and I am not a big bread eater but she makes the best corn bread you could ever want in that pan. She has tried making it in other pans and there simply is no comparison. Cast iron cookware Rocks.

GaryL
 

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Discussion Starter #16
My cast iron bean pot I inherited from my Dad who past in 1995 and I think he bought it in the last 60's so I will pass it on. 11996464_10206209670152778_206037470_o.jpg I made Chili in it this weekend- 12169382_10206459254272225_1644555780_o.jpg 12168268_10206460067012543_1156642312_o.jpg 12169882_10206460177175297_2073822642_o.jpg nice even heat can not beat CI.
 

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That is from the official Lodge Cookware website. Ma and granny would say stay away forever. They didn't want any of their hard won seasoning removed, even after it became well established.

I know it may not be obvious, but those accumulated years of seasoning from a variety of foods and greases impart a special flavor to the food way beyond the added ingredients. It just does.

So, until some water washing, tomato cooking, iron chef serves me a plate of venison hash or fried rabbit in white better than mom and granny could do it...I'm wiping like Gary said, and if it has a little stubborn bit I'm scrubbing lightly with a bit of salt like I been taught.

Pfft....:D
Exactly the way I was taught....
 

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All I use on my cast iron is my spatula. I scrape hard. After years, the rough finish starts to wear down and then you REALLY got something! Heat, a steel straight edge spatula, (not a curved edge) and a dry wiping rag. Every once in a while, I'll put the skillet in the oven and heat the whole thing for a bit to cook off the stuff on the outside and handle area.

One thing I learned is heat control. With the right temperature, my eggs over easy flip perfect every time. Too hot and the edges stick, too cool and the yoke will start to set up before they are firm enough to flip.

Anyone ever make biscuits in the cast iron biscuit pan?


using a cast iron biscuit recipe will turn out the best biscuits I've ever had. The left-over biscuits are great too. They set up a little and hold their shape a bit more than fresh biscuits. I'll take a couple squirrels and fry up the meat, pick off the bones, make my gravy with the meat and ladle over these biscuits. Fried squirrel gravy and biscuits, just doesn't get any better.
 
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