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Discussion Starter #1
What are your aftermarket Clutch Preferences and why?



The EBC clutch kit "Dirt Racer" friction plates with springs.



VS



The Barnett Kit, Friction Plates and Springs.



Whats your personal experience with either kit, or any tips tricks I should know when rebuilding?



I am deciding which kit to buy for my build up...



I've only had poor results with the stock set up after power enhancements...... Whats the best set up?!?!



Thanks for any info guys!
 

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This post has potential value. To keep everything connected, please remind us what mods you did to your bike to warrant a beefier clutch. With this, we have a known problem and some solutions to consider. My bike is stock, and I am happy with my stock clutch. Whats going on with your bike. Thanks. Gerry
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hey Gerry-Good Point.



HEre are the mods I did to my bike before the tear down:



Bigger Main Jet 130

Shimmed the needle 4 shims

FMF powercore

14-47 Sprocket



AFter these modifications the stock clutch assembly would continually slip no matter what, even under moderate acceleration. I even put in brand new OEM friction plates and still had the same problem. I experimented with different oil weights to no avail. So now that I am building up the TW, this time with a WEB cam and a K&N air filter I'm going to be making a little more power. I figured I'd like to get the best available clutch set up this time around and see what other TW aficionado thoughts are on the matter...



-Todd
 

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Well Ronny put the TTR clutch in his tw on steroids... It has 6 plates instead of 5 or something. I'd imagine they make aftermarket springs/plates for the TTR bikes, so the ultimate TW clutch would probably be TTR setup with aftermarket goodies?



A + B = C



 

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Well Ronny put the TTR clutch in his tw on steroids... It has 6 plates instead of 5 or something. I'd imagine they make aftermarket springs/plates for the TTR bikes, so the ultimate TW clutch would probably be TTR setup with aftermarket goodies?



A + B = C







I used barnett clutch and springs (They make it hard to find neutral)with the TW 226 build and they slipped so I added a shim to each spring and that has worked great for years.



With the TW 250 build I used the stock TTR clutch (all used plates) with shims under the springs and it works fine.



Save the money and add a shim under the springs and forget about it.



Just a thought



Ronnydog
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok cool..



So perhaps I can go with one or the other clutch kits and just add a shim in additi0on to the aftermarket springs... Should be solid then.



Is there a specific shim amount you would recommend?
 

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Simple mod with stock springs.



Ronnydog





Ok cool..



So perhaps I can go with one or the other clutch kits and just add a shim in additi0on to the aftermarket springs... Should be solid then.



Is there a specific shim amount you would recommend?
.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ronny You're the MAN!!



Thanks so much for the helpful pics!



NOw the question is, which friction plates and springs to get....



Barnett or the EBC?



Hmmm, kinda sitting right on the fence....



Thanks Again Man!



Woo Hoo!!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Just checking in to see if any one out there has used either the Barnett and or the EBC clutch kits, and possibly chime in...



Running All stock?



Barnett?



EBC?



Like/Dislike



Slipping?



What other mod?



Whats your set up?



This was my set up:





14-47

Main Jet 130

4 Needle Shims

FMF Power Core

All Stock Clutch, Slipping like butter on hot teflon.







Also Ronny, did you make the shims your using? I would be interested in taking 4 of the them of you wouldn't mind.. I can pay you the cost...
 

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Tdub has a XT225 clutch with an extra plate, stock plates, Barnett discs and springs. Drags a bit when cold--fine once engine warms. Overkill.



I've used Barnett discs for over 40 years. Dragging when cold is typical as they are intended for racing. Not really a big deal, and easy to live with for the added power transfer and durability. I've never worn out a Barnett clutch--consider it a lifetime deal.



Boils down to two choices, really. Either fit a 225/230 clutch or put Barnett plates in a stock clutch. Either is a good solution for a nearly stock engine. If doing major hop-ups, go with the extra disc and Barnett parts.



I've had enough problems with EBC brake and clutch parts over the years that I will no longer use them as they simply cannot be trusted 100% of the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hey Qwerty-



Thanks for all the great info!



I think I am going to use the Barnett plates and springs, in the stock clutch.



Quick question, how about shimming in addition to the Barnett plates and Springs?



-Todd
 

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I've never needed to shim a Barnett clutch. I've seen several clutches over the years ruined by shimming. Be careful.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Ok Thanks Man.



Now that I'm thinking about it, better to take things step by step. Doing more things at once can only compound all the variables...



Barnett it is...



Gotta order one up!
 

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A thin coat of grease on the case side of the cover gasket will help it come off in one pioece should you opt for shims later.
 

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Coilbind the springs and bad things happen. Clutch springs are coil springs, just like any other coil spring. When the space between the coils is used up, everything comes to a dead stop. apply more force, and something will bend or break.



Nothing wrong with increasing spring preload by using shims and spacers. It's done all the time on such varied applications as shock springs, front forks, and valve springs. Just be sure not to use enough preload to use up all the travel in the spring. A longer spring with the same rate at the same installed height also increases preload. A spring of higher rate the same length at the same installed height also increases preload. More than one way to skin a cat. Each choice does have other properties to consider--none are always wrong or always right.



I've never shimmed clutch springs because I opt for stiffer/longer clutch springs. The engines I build are usually well-abused and cheap, so I'd be replacing old, used springs, anyway. Aftermarket springs cost little, if any, more than OEM. Might as well get the good stuff for the same money.
 
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