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My new to me 2006 TW has a clutch lever that gets into the friction zone far out from the grip, yet there is the required few millimeters of slack between the lever and the bracket when it is all the way out. Anyone had this problem and will adjusting the cable down by the engine fix this? Doesn't seem to be any clutch slippage when the clutch is all the way out.
 

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The adjuster down by the engine is for major cable adjustments. Such as a cable change or work on the clutch its self. The adjuster on the perch is for minor adjustments like minor wear or cable stretch.
So the answer is no its not gonna change where the clutch engages or disengages.
I would say if the clutch is disengaging and engaging properly with out any slippage its functioning your alright.
 

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Just to ride the coat tail of Salabim, there should be plenty jumping into respond soon, this clutch just doesn't feel like other bikes, it's a narrow friction zone, and it's almost as you've fully released the lever. It's a quirk of the TW that initially takes some getting used to
 

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My new to me 2006 TW has a clutch lever that gets into the friction zone far out from the grip, yet there is the required few millimeters of slack between the lever and the bracket when it is all the way out.
Yes. That is how they all are.

You'll get used to it. Or just treat it like the on/off switch it kind of is with 14hp at the other end.

EDIT: I should add, I adjusted the clutch as per Badgerflorida's post below and put in EBC heavy springs as per SkiPro 3 post below, when I installed my kickstarter. I also installed shorty levers with a different pivot point than stock levers.

This all helped, but still feels nothing like a "normal" clutch that one can slip and modulate easily.

I find that when I get off another bike, and ride the TW, the TW feels like a switch again. :)
 
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The stock clutch springs are weak, requiring them to be nearly fully engaged before the bike engine will connect to the output shaft. Many here, myself included, have upgraded the clutch springs to stiffer, heavy duty springs. This does give a little more range with the clutch lever engagement range.

However, I've toyed with the idea of extending the clutch arm at the engine case. Like a cheater bar on a ratchet wrench, the torque would be extended over a longer travel distance, allowing what feels to be a larger engagement range at the bar lever. Usually such extension is used to lower the effort to operate said lever, but it will spread the load across a longer travel as well.

I don't think anyone has gone so far as to even attempt to extend the arm on the clutch lever at the engine though.
 

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What I was wondering is on Badgers post, would adjusting the internal screw in the clutch center help change where it starts to engage? I was a thinnin it may.
Or is it there just to adjust the play in the clutch lifter ( i think its called) ?
 

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I’ve never done it but yes it should. I just got used to it “as is”. I’ve had 8 of em and they were all pretty late friction zone.
 

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I've read the same complaint about my previous bike, a Yamaha V-Star 650. People say both motorcycles have a narrow friction point that is not close in to the handgrip. I've rode quite a few bikes over the years and I have to say I've never felt this was an issue with either bike. You just get used to it, and it doesn't hinder the bike in any way. I find that it is still pretty easy to feather the clutch. YMMV..?
 

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The stock clutch springs are weak, requiring them to be nearly fully engaged before the bike engine will connect to the output shaft. Many here, myself included, have upgraded the clutch springs to stiffer, heavy duty springs. This does give a little more range with the clutch lever engagement range.

However, I've toyed with the idea of extending the clutch arm at the engine case. Like a cheater bar on a ratchet wrench, the torque would be extended over a longer travel distance, allowing what feels to be a larger engagement range at the bar lever. Usually such extension is used to lower the effort to operate said lever, but it will spread the load across a longer travel as well.

I don't think anyone has gone so far as to even attempt to extend the arm on the clutch lever at the engine though.
i have often bemoaned the clutch on my 2021 and im also new to motorcycles which i suppose makes it worse. your comment is the first critical analysis of the system that really helped me to understand the, "why" of it. i've actually posted on how it feels like an on/off switch and not a, "proper" clutch; now i know why. changing the throw of the control arm is a bloody stroke of brilliance, one i'm anxious to try as it doesnt require me to open the guts of the machine (something i dont feel confident doing.)
did you have a part in mind for that? if not i'm going to get some aluminum bar stock and have at it until i beat that clutch into submission. it's the only complaint i have about my little putt putt. :)
 

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Yes. I
What I was wondering is on Badgers post, would adjusting the internal screw in the clutch center help change where it starts to engage? I was a thinnin it may.
Or is it there just to adjust the play in the clutch lifter ( i think its called) ?
Yes it does. I cheated mine to slightly off center.
 

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The stock clutch springs are weak, requiring them to be nearly fully engaged before the bike engine will connect to the output shaft. Many here, myself included, have upgraded the clutch springs to stiffer, heavy duty springs. This does give a little more range with the clutch lever engagement range.

However, I've toyed with the idea of extending the clutch arm at the engine case. Like a cheater bar on a ratchet wrench, the torque would be extended over a longer travel distance, allowing what feels to be a larger engagement range at the bar lever. Usually such extension is used to lower the effort to operate said lever, but it will spread the load across a longer travel as well.

I don't think anyone has gone so far as to even attempt to extend the arm on the clutch lever at the engine though.
I had this exact mod on my old KLR650. It made a noticeable difference.
 

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changing the throw of the control arm is a bloody stroke of brilliance, one i'm anxious to try as it doesnt require me to open the guts of the machine (something i dont feel confident doing.)
did you have a part in mind for that? if not i'm going to get some aluminum bar stock and have at it until i beat that clutch into submission. it's the only complaint i have about my little putt putt. :)
Not sure about a stroke of brilliance, but thank you anyways!
I do not have a clue how to achieve a longer arm but then I haven't really looked at it. The springs allow me to do what I want; 2 finger clutch slip when bogging down on hill climbs over technical terrain. Under heavy load, the range for the clutch lever seems to be wider than with no load. Does that make sense? In other words, the clutch does slip when under load and working the lever, but more like an on/off when little load like launching from a stop on flat pavement or shifting between gears. Give that a try on a steep hill sometime or maybe just put the front tire against a wall or large rock and try releasing the clutch and applying throttle until you feel the engine achive some load. Notice how much or little clutch play you have before the bike stalls or the rear tire spins. Throttle will need to be applied to prevent stall, but you should experience some more range in the clutch lever under load like this. Especially with heavier springs installed.
 

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Not sure about a stroke of brilliance, but thank you anyways!
I do not have a clue how to achieve a longer arm but then I haven't really looked at it. The springs allow me to do what I want; 2 finger clutch slip when bogging down on hill climbs over technical terrain. Under heavy load, the range for the clutch lever seems to be wider than with no load. Does that make sense? In other words, the clutch does slip when under load and working the lever, but more like an on/off when little load like launching from a stop on flat pavement or shifting between gears. Give that a try on a steep hill sometime or maybe just put the front tire against a wall or large rock and try releasing the clutch and applying throttle until you feel the engine achive some load. Notice how much or little clutch play you have before the bike stalls or the rear tire spins. Throttle will need to be applied to prevent stall, but you should experience some more range in the clutch lever under load like this. Especially with heavier springs installed.
im going to have to have a word with my local shop about changing those springs. anything i can do to get that clutch more like a slider than a switch makes me happy.
 

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im going to have to have a word with my local shop about changing those springs. anything i can do to get that clutch more like a slider than a switch makes me happy.
No need for a shop. It's a very simple change. Don't even need to drain the oil. Just lean the bike over, I use a spare tire, and remove the side cover. You'll see the clutch. Have the manual handy and follow the procedure outlined on how to disassemble and reassemble the clutch. It's just 4 bolts as I recall, then swap the springs. I think there are threads here showing how this is accomplished. Or just putt-putt on over and we'll do it here in my garage.
EDIT
Good idea to have a side cover gasket when working on the clutch. Be sure gasket surface is totally clean, apply aluminum anti-seize to the gasket surfaces when replacing and they'll never stick again or leak for that matter.
 

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BTW, you HAVE confirmed the spring at the engine side of the cable is set in their prospective slots, right? Here's a photo of what the spring is supposed to look like when both ends are in their grooves;
214038
 

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im going to have to have a word with my local shop about changing those springs. anything i can do to get that clutch more like a slider than a switch makes me happy.
I changed the springs in one of my TW clutches and it seemed to change the engagement zone. I then changed the springs on my wife's TW and it didn't seem to make a difference. I dunno why as they were the same springs. Seems to work for folks most of the time but be aware it may not work every time. I don't bother changing the springs anymore on the newer TW's and just live with it the way it is except I used adjustable lever's which makes it seem like the clutch engagement zone is earlier (i.e. my hand isn't spread out as far before it catches).
 
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No need for a shop. It's a very simple change. Don't even need to drain the oil. Just lean the bike over, I use a spare tire, and remove the side cover. You'll see the clutch. Have the manual handy and follow the procedure outlined on how to disassemble and reassemble the clutch. It's just 4 bolts as I recall, then swap the springs. I think there are threads here showing how this is accomplished. Or just putt-putt on over and we'll do it here in my garage.
EDIT
Good idea to have a side cover gasket when working on the clutch. Be sure gasket surface is totally clean, apply aluminum anti-seize to the gasket surfaces when replacing and they'll never stick again or leak for that matter.
hehe thank you! i'd LOVE to pop over and have a pro help with this, and i believe in the incredible capabilities of the tw but... i live in hawaii and im guessing crossing half the pacific would be expecting a bit much. 😋 i actually went out about the neighborhood today and i think im getting used to it. or its wearing in. either way its good.
 

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Near the end of travel is where it is supposed to catch fully. As the clutches wear the friction zone moves in on the clutch lever. Just like on the old manual vehicles, the clutch was supposed to catch close to the top not the bottom. Once you are rolling you don't have to squeeze the clutch fully, just that little bit will release and you go into the next gear. If you adjustment is close to the bars at full release you have to pull the lever all the way in to shift. Your clutches are adjusted properly. As others mentioned, I would double check that clutch spring though.
 

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hehe thank you! i'd LOVE to pop over and have a pro help with this, and i believe in the incredible capabilities of the tw but... i live in hawaii and im guessing crossing half the pacific would be expecting a bit much. 😋 i actually went out about the neighborhood today and i think im getting used to it. or its wearing in. either way its good.
I'm willing to sacrifice and come to you, considering the difficulty it would be to bring the bike to California. As long as you pay my travel expenses. Ha! Actually, before the zombie apocalypse, we would visit Hawaii every couple years or so. I really need a visit, but from what I hear, things just are not ready for tourists yet. Maui and Kauai are my favorite islands with Maui probably the leader because I like the out of the way beaches there better. We don't do much touristy stuff, just hang out at the beach with a bottle of POG, a book, a beach chair/grass mat and my snorkel gear. A little sight seeing, some shopping and a lot of just aloha spirit! I have a favorite neighborhood grocery store where this old Japanese man makes the best sushi. Oh, and poke! I pick up a rod and reel from Walmart before leaving home, stop in and get a pack of frozen squid on my way to the rental and I'm good to go for doing a little fishing too. I'll gift the fishing gear to some kid when ready to head home, stopping at the marina until check in at the airport before leaving.
 
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