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I'm working on my daughter's newly aquired 1989 TW200. The clutch lever felt very soft, but was rideable and slipped a little in higher gears on occasion. I found the clutch arm return spring to be broke. I replaced the spring and adjusted clutch free play. The clutch now feels better, but doesn't fully dis-engage(meaning it kills the bike when going into first on an idle and when pushing bike in gear when turned off, there's quite a bit of resistance). I next drained the oil and pulled the clutch apart to inspect. The springs and friction discs were measured and within tolerance. Should I put it back together with fresh oil and try again? Is there something else I should adjust while it's apart? Not sure where to go from here but would like to get this resolved as the weather is getting nicer and I have a daughter that's ready to go ride.
 

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I am not a clutch expert but I am pretty sure there is an adjustment you can make on the clutch itself. Check for the manual in the tech section and similar threads that show up below or a search.
 

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I have a new 2019 tw200 and it does the same thing. Clutch is ok in top gear, no slipping but drags with clutch pulled in and motor not running. Normal for this bike.
 

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Starting from cold, the TW will often stall when putting it into gear. Some people like to rock the bike back and forth with the engine off and the bike in gear (with the clutch pulled in) – personally, I find that if you blip the throttle before stuffing it into gear (grabbing a fistful of front brake at this point is “advisable”), it’s enough to break the plates free

Changing to synthetic is also a way around the problem, though the “sticky plates” start to come back after a thousand or so miles. In short, there is no one simple cure – it comes with the bike, so get used to it

Though, as your bike is a 1989, it is possible that the cork plates are “gunked up” beyond redemption, and even swelling. A cheap thing to try, would be to replace those cork plates, and see if it improves the situation, especialy the “slip at speed” situation. Cork may not “absorb” oil, but 30 years later, the coating of oil defeats the friction, and causes swelling

So in theory – you should some improvement when pushing it in gear with the engine off (on a warm engine), but still expect to have to blip the throttle before putting it into gear from cold

The clutch action itself on a TW is light when compared to say a Kawasaki 550, but as long as it works, don’t sweat it ……
 
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