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Hi, brought my new TW200 to the farm yesterday and I noticed the clutch is releasing all at once instead of gradually. Can anyone tell me what adjustment I need to make for better clutch operation? Thanks in advance.
 

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Does it feel sticky? Maybe something like this?


If so, this is normal, lube the cable, check the spring at the bottom, check your cable tension... it'll help, but it just takes time workinf the clutch to break it in. Mine was gone after a couple hundred miles after a long ride through the mountains.
 

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When I brought my new one home I had the same thing happening. Lubing the cable and lever pivot helped a little.
And as BigBlake said. The more miles I put on it the better the clutch has become. Four hundred on it now.
Much smoother release and the plates no longer stick together after sitting a couple days.
 

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I changed my clutch springs to the stiffer springs after I initially had sticky clutch. Didn't make much difference lol.
 

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The cable actuated TW200 is not the smoothest. Plus it doesn't have a long engage/disengagement point. It's kind of abrupt. If your TW is brand new it will get a little better. The advice above is good especially the return spring not being attached or installed wrong. Check that out and lube the cable and make sure it's routed correctly and not being stretched or crimped when the handlebars move.
 

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The cable actuated TW200 is not the smoothest. Plus it doesn't have a long engage/disengagement point. It's kind of abrupt.
Yup... The tw clutch is very much like a light switch, its either on or off. Every Yamaha i have ever owned has been like this ( all dirt bikes).
 

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The clutch springs are too weak. This is a well documented issue with many threads on the topic. Aftermarket heavy duty springs will make a world of difference. The stock springs are so weak that it's possible to slip the clutch with just a load! Once you have a stiffer spring set installed, the clutch will engage, disengage much more smoothly and over a longer throw of the clutch lever. Stock, the plates release at the very end of the lever's throw, they are that weak.
 

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I noticed exactly zero length of pull difference in the engagement zone of the clutch after the spring upgrade... don't the springs just apply pressure to the pack via the pressure plate when the clutch is released? Is there an actual change in the distance the pressure plate moves when pulling the clutch lever and releasing?

Im only asking because I'm not a clutch expert and want to make sure I'm understanding things correctly.
 

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As I understand it, the distance of travel between engaged and disengaged is what counts. No amount of “stronger springs” is going to change that distance – it remains exactly the same – simple physics

What stronger springs can do, is to increase “bite” as the clutch lever is fully released. This can prevent slippage and wear on the cork plates. Whether or not you need that increased bite depends on how much you ride your clutch (or not), but if your clutch is failing because of plate wear, the stronger springs will work in your favour – but if the clutch is fine, you’re unlikely to notice the difference

In my time, I have experience of Motoguzzi, Yamaha, Suzuki, Benelli, Honda, Kawasaki, plus a few more of undeterminate make – and every one of them I have taken to like a duck to water. Barring perhaps the Guzzi clutch, which is a dry plate car clutch, grab a fist full and get on with it. If you could have more play in those clutches, you would by design have more wear. It’s either “in” or it’s “out” – that’s what they’re designed to do, with as little as possible in-between

So, if you want to say “My clutch has no play”, please state compared to what ? – because that would make a lot more sense. Compared to your Honda Acccura, compared to your truck – what are you comparing it to ?

“My Yamaha TW200 has no power” – compared to my V6 Mercedes …….
 

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Once you have a stiffer spring set installed, the clutch will engage, disengage much more smoothly and over a longer throw of the clutch lever. Stock, the plates release at the very end of the lever's throw, they are that weak.
I have to disagree with you on this statement. One of my TW's has Barnett plates and springs and it performs identically to my other TW which just has a spring upgrade. They are both still light switches with the engagement near the end of the lever throw.
 

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I noticed exactly zero length of pull difference in the engagement zone of the clutch after the spring upgrade... don't the springs just apply pressure to the pack via the pressure plate when the clutch is released? Is there an actual change in the distance the pressure plate moves when pulling the clutch lever and releasing?

Im only asking because I'm not a clutch expert and want to make sure I'm understanding things correctly.
The original springs are so weak that they nearly need all their resistance to disengage the clutch and engage the motor. In fact, I was able to actually get my clutch to slip with the lever fully out and the springs pressing the plates together, without stalling the bike. Many hill climbs had my rpm's revving up and down as the clutch would slip due to weak springs.
The after market heavy springs allowed for the plates to make good contact at much earlier engagement of the lever and a wider range of lever movement between fully engaged and fully released. I'm able to easily slip my clutch now with zero throttle to walk out of mud, steep hills, etc.
 

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Add one set of clutch plate and buy a XT225 clutch pusher plate pushing bolt.

Bolt diameter Should be cut to the normal size.

BW200 clutch spring is stronger and add 0.5mm washer to preload.

the inside of clutch cover must be grinded .
 

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If you guys have no clutch play, if it's like a light switch; on or off with nothing in between, then how do you take off from a dead stop? Are you popping a wheelie each time? Stalling? I can slip the hell out of my clutch and I do on many a hill climb. I'm lazy and don't shift as often as I should. I'll short shift, then slip the clutch to gain power through rpm and control speed same way. Especially on uphill switchbacks; I'll give it a good amount of throttle, then short shift and slip the piss out of that clutch to keep me moving forward and upward through the switch. I have a shorty clutch lever and keep two fingers on it constantly when riding off road. On road at lights and in traffic I'll keep a finger on it.
 
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Of course there is still play, I have a friction zone just as all other TWs with functioning clutches. I was just inquiring about the increase in friction zone during the clutch release... and that I didn't feel any real difference between my stock clutch springs and the Rocky Mtn ATV springs as far as the clutch lever play/action/friction is concerned.
 

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Of course there is still play, I have a friction zone just as all other TWs with functioning clutches. I was just inquiring about the increase in friction zone during the clutch release... and that I didn't feel any real difference between my stock clutch springs and the Rocky Mtn ATV springs as far as the clutch lever play/action/friction is concerned.
Were you only trying it on flat ground or did you try it on some steeper off road stuff? I really noticed it when off road on steep climbs that there was more 'forgiveness' in the lever's range.
I think my aftermarket springs are EBC brand. Not sure about that, I'll have to check my log.

EDIT
Nope! They are Vesrah heavy duty clutch springs.
 

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I initially changed the springs trying to get rid of my sticky clutch. Then I took it out in capitol forest up some short steep single tracks, up and down logging roads all over the hills/mountains there.

I'm just speaking from a perspective that changing springs out, without having a failure or worn parts, I did not notice or feel a difference in the clutch use.

I imagine if your springs were worn out for some time, or just got a batch of soft springs, or hadn't made proper cable adjustments along with it, you might see a significant difference. But just swapping them out from stock springs expecting them to make the clutch operate like other motorcycles is what I don't believe to be valid.
 

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If you guys have no clutch play, if it's like a light switch; on or off with nothing in between, then how do you take off from a dead stop? Are you popping a wheelie each time? Stalling? I can slip the hell out of my clutch and I do on many a hill climb. I'm lazy and don't shift as often as I should. I'll short shift, then slip the clutch to gain power through rpm and control speed same way. Especially on uphill switchbacks; I'll give it a good amount of throttle, then short shift and slip the piss out of that clutch to keep me moving forward and upward through the switch. I have a shorty clutch lever and keep two fingers on it constantly when riding off road. On road at lights and in traffic I'll keep a finger on it.
There is still free play in the lever and a "friction zone" but its like an 1/8th of the lever throw max and way out near the end of the throw. Like i said every dirt based Yamaha i have ever owned has been this way and i have owned probably 10 over my lifetime, I have owned YZ's, IT's, TT's etc, none were any different than my TW. There is no adjustment that will widen it or get it closer to the bar that i have found either.

The reason i call it a light switch is compared to other motorcycles it feels like one. My Africa Twin for instance has a nice wide friction zone and it starts grabbing maybe a third of the way off the bar. My better half's NC700x is real similar to my AT's clutch, they are cable operated too just like the TW. The Ducati Multistrada i used to have was hydrauilc and it started grabbing just off the bar and you could slip it for over half the lever throw if you wanted to, it was very forgiving and in some instances you needed it with the super tall gearing that bike had. Imagine getting off a TW where you pretty much dump the clutch and go and then hop on that bike, it was a totally different feel.
 
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