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Any one know of a good cold-weather riding glove? I've tried every pair of gloves I own and nothing seems to work. The wind cuts through the fleece and leather gloves, and my ski gloves are too bulky. There are a lot of choices available ranging in price form 30-80 bucks. I'm looking for a dedicated riding glove- something that allows me to have good dexterity while riding, blocks the wind, is kind of water proof, and WARM!
 

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HippoHands. Easy to make, but you'll need brush guards to keep them off your levers at speed.







If your gloves keep your hands warm off the bike, wind is your enemy. Block the wind. Whatever you use to block the wind also needs to be not in contact with your gloves to prevent conductive heat loss. I've used gallon milk jugs and duct tape to make windblocks in a pinch.



Grip heaters also work well, though draw too much power to keep the battery charged if used only on short trips. On longer trips, the grips become too warm and it is necessary to turn them down so they use less power.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
HippoHands. Easy to make, but you'll need brush guards to keep them off your levers at speed.







If your gloves keep your hands warm off the bike, wind is your enemy. Block the wind. Whatever you use to block the wind also needs to be not in contact with your gloves to prevent conductive heat loss. I've used gallon milk jugs and duct tape to make windblocks in a pinch.



Grip heaters also work well, though draw too much power to keep the battery charged if used only on short trips. On longer trips, the grips become too warm and it is necessary to turn them down so they use less power.




I LOVE IT!



Correct, the wind is my enemy. My hand guards block some of it, but not all. I've been blessed with clear but cold weather and I've been riding. I've been suffering in the past, but no more, I'm getting some new gloves!
 

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Some gloves work better than others, but the best bet is HippoHands, rain boots, or milk jugs. I have $100 pair of winter gloves, and summer gloves and HippoHands are better. Tdub wears Hippohands all winter. Winter gloves and HippoHands are an excellent combination. HippoHands, winter gloves, and heated grips are heaven! It is simply impossible to get adequate insulation in gloves without too much bulk. Stop wasting your money.
 

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On a long motorcycle trip I did last year (6500+miles) I try to find the "perfect" gloves, and I came to the conclusion that they do not exist. On pouring rain all of my gloves got wet. Once wet, even with hand guards, they get very very cold and uncomfortable. The trick was to have 4 pairs of gloves and change to dry ones once the ones I was wearing got wet.



One day we hit freezing temperatures and the only gloves that kept my hands warm were Heated gloves.



The bulky, seudo waterproof, ski gloves keep your hands fairly warm, but you do not have any dexterity with them on.

Another solution is to have several of the latex disposable gloves and use those inside the regular winter gloves... won't do much for warmth but helps avoiding water in your hands.



The HippoHands is about the only solution if you are driving often in low temperature weather or rain.
 

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I agree that no glove will do the job until you reduce that wind around your hands. A reasonable set of handguards will do some good, but not the whole task - hence Qwerty's rec for enclosing the hand in his fireman's boots or hippohands. You can get extra large shields (that should be supported in part by already installed handguards from snowmobile supply places. I bought some cordura=like Moose Racing protectors that greatly reduced wind over my standard moose racing hand guards. I must admit I have not used them much - but they did not cost much either (cerca $15 as I recall). They do stay in place, and I'd definately use them if I was going to be on the bike for more than 1 hour at a time. I'll try to dredge a photo. Here I've only mounted one to try it out and to insure that I had good hand control.


They are easy to take on and off (velcro and zip ties or ??.



Me, I try to wait to ride until 10:00 when the sun has warmed things a bit in New Mexico - a luxury of retirement. Good luck - cold hands are the pitts. Tom
 

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I bit the bullet and bought Gerbing Hybrid gloves. I figure it I bought a pair of $150 non-heated gauntlet gloves and they didnt keep my hands warm, then I just wasted $150. I spent $300 on gloves and battery packs, since I wasn't sure how the charging system would work if I plugged the gloves into the bike. Anyways the only thing that stops me from riding cold days, is having cold hands. I rode last weekend in Denver CO while it was snowing and 26 degrees out (30 miles) and the gloves kept my hands so warm i had to turn them off high to medium. They are best $300 I've spend for my bikes. If I would have bought them years ago I would have ridden all my bikes year round...just my too cents (oh not too bulky either)



fletch
 

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Hey munk. Looks like a nice pair of gloves. I believe you have the option of connecting them to your bike battery with the y connector. I have Gears heated gloves and they keep my hands toasty. I also have a very warm pair of Watson motorcycle gauntlet gloves that are pretty good unless it's very cold out.
 

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I don't like wearing my winter gloves because the insulation reduces the feel I have on the levers. I can't release the clutch as smoothly.



I was thinking what I would really like are gloves that only have insulation on the front and sides of the fingers, the back of the hands, and not in the palms. I don't have heated grips, but for those that do I think this would also add to the amount of heat that gets to your hands.



Does anyone know of any gloves made like this?



Mark
 

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Any one know of a good cold-weather riding glove? I've tried every pair of gloves I own and nothing seems to work. The wind cuts through the fleece and leather gloves, and my ski gloves are too bulky. There are a lot of choices available ranging in price form 30-80 bucks. I'm looking for a dedicated riding glove- something that allows me to have good dexterity while riding, blocks the wind, is kind of water proof, and WARM!


I started riding when I lived in the Pocono Mts. of PA, for a few years on and off my bike was my only transportation, I remember riding when plows had piled up the snow to 10 or 12 feet on the sides of back roads, and my hands were so cold it felt like the skin was being peeled off.



Never did like the cold, but after trying a number of types of gloves over the past 40 years of riding the thing that I found worked best was what I discovered back then... leather gloves with genuine rabbit fur lining. They can be hard to find, often not cheap (although you can find deals), sometimes a bit bulky but I've tried all kinds of synthetic stuff and nothing has ever come close in my opinion... still keep a pair in the closet just in case, but otherwise avoid riding when it's below 45 or 50.



You might want to consider these...



Eric
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I agree that no glove will do the job until you reduce that wind around your hands. A reasonable set of handguards will do some good, but not the whole task - hence Qwerty's rec for enclosing the hand in his fireman's boots or hippohands. You can get extra large shields (that should be supported in part by already installed handguards from snowmobile supply places. I bought some cordura=like Moose Racing protectors that greatly reduced wind over my standard moose racing hand guards. I must admit I have not used them much - but they did not cost much either (cerca $15 as I recall). They do stay in place, and I'd definately use them if I was going to be on the bike for more than 1 hour at a time. I'll try to dredge a photo. Here I've only mounted one to try it out and to insure that I had good hand control.


They are easy to take on and off (velcro and zip ties or ??.



Me, I try to wait to ride until 10:00 when the sun has warmed things a bit in New Mexico - a luxury of retirement. Good luck - cold hands are the pitts. Tom




I like those. Last April, my Dad and I did a poker run and it was around 20 degrees in the morning. All the hardcore guys had those big wind deflectors. I didn't know what they were until now. That may be the ticket.
 

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Check out a brand called seirus, i got the extreme model work great for me with no hand guards. I'd imagine with guards would work even better. Very wind resistant and form fitting giving good hand movement. i originally bought them for hunting cuz i needed warmth but still able to use my hands and fingers.
 

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They have them now for sale $5.99!!

But it looks like not very water resistant...
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Check out a brand called seirus, i got the extreme model work great for me with no hand guards. I'd imagine with guards would work even better. Very wind resistant and form fitting giving good hand movement. i originally bought them for hunting cuz i needed warmth but still able to use my hands and fingers.




My wife bought me a pair of Seirus gloves for hunting as well. Very nice gloves.
 

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I've struggled to find a good glove, but I also have self-diagnosed Raynaud's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raynaud's_phenomenon). Some days I have no problem, other days my fingers throb with pain so bad it consumes your mind. Mittens work MUCH better than fingered gloves, but you lose dexterity on the bike. Same loss of dexterity on the snowmobile, but at least that has one less lever (no clutch) and has hand warmers with a stator to match. It's been said the vibration of handlebars (bikes/snowmobiles/ATV's/etc.) can trigger Raynaud's too and we all know how the TW vibrates at speed!



When commuting to work in the early and late season I usually bring 2 pairs of gloves with me. Warm ones for the morning and lighter ones in the warmer afternoon ride home. I got a pair of Ice Armor X gloves (My linkhttp://clamcorp.com/IceArmorClothing/GlovesMitts/XGloves/tabid/367/Default.aspx) for winter snowmobiling so I'm excited to try them on the bike. On the snowmobile it was hit or miss...30 below and I had no problems, 20 above and my fingers throbbed. Other times 30 below and they were throbbing and 20 above fine. The reviews are good for this glove and they did their job quite well for me, but my condition seems to even trump good gloves.



There are good gloves out there but I have a unique situation, but blocking the wind is really important so the gloves can remain effective at keeping your hands warmth in the glove not 'blown' off by the wind. I need hand guards on my bike!!
 

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One alternative to mittens that works well for me is the proverbial lobster glove. It has a separate thumb, and seperate double fingers (fingers 4 and 5 in one, and index and middle finger in the other). Mine were bought in a bicycle shop. Mine were made by Pearl Izumi pricey but have advantage of dexterity (can have separate actions of first two fingers versus those in second cluster) and advantage of mitten (less separation of fingers). I suspect a photo is unneeded. I often wear a glove liner inside them and maybe special to me, I find that having two pairs of warm gloves that I alternate back and forth as my hands get cold helps. I carry one pair and shift to them after 45 min or so and my hands are starting to get stiff/numb. Cold hands are painful and can lead to accidents. Tom
 
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