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Discussion Starter #1
My new old 2001 has a mangled counter-shaft sprocket cover.







I want to change the 14 tooth sprocket to a 15. I'm thinking about taking my angle grinder with a cut off wheel to the cover. That would remove the offending bit and allow access in the future for easier sprocket swapping, killing two birds with one grinder you might say.



Where is my thinking flawed? Will the sprocket eat my jeans? I noticed even the hollow mod TWs with no chain guards do not expose the counter-shaft sprocket. Thought I should run it by the cognoscenti before I do harm.
 

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Keep it minimal. There's an oil passage and a bearing in the cover.



You wanted someone to stop you, no?
 

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The countershaft sprocket cover cannot be removed because it houses a bearing that supports the outboard end of the countershaft. Any mod that will allow removing the sprocket without removing the cover will remove the bearing, causing bad things to happen to the countershaft, trans, and engine cases.



Grind it smooth inside and out and call it good.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
In the immortal words of Gilda Radner's character

on Saturday Night Live, Emily Litella,

"Oh. That's very different. Never Mind"



Thanks, you guys.
 

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The countershaft sprocket cover cannot be removed because it houses a bearing that supports the outboard end of the countershaft. Any mod that will allow removing the sprocket without removing the cover will remove the bearing, causing bad things to happen to the countershaft, trans, and engine cases.
While the subject is up....I just ordered the side case gasket so I can change the sprocket. Is there something that I missed and should have ordered? TIA Gary
 

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Given my experience, I am inclined to say you can trim away what is damaged, just don't roll over the edge and begin cutting the face of the case. What I think is a better idea would be to carefully tap the 'flaps' downward to present you with a depression. Clean the case area top and the underside facing the chain so that it's free of oil and dirt. Rough up the area with a bit of sandpaper, don't scratch up the area much beyond what is damaged. Use some JB weld putty to fill in and sand to restore original contour. Carefully spray that section of the case with some paint and you will be back to looking good. As was mentioned, that case section can not be trimmed to make sprocket removal any easier. I trimmed my case so I can watch the chain move from one primary sprocket to the other when I switch ratios. Gerry



 

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I run o-ring chains so replace the countershaft seals each countershaft sprocket change. Seems that the seals wear out almost as fast than an o-ring chain, and if I don't change them, I'll be pulling the cover again shortly after installing the countershaft. Both seals together cost about $9, so the added expense is worth the reduced maintenance down the road.
 
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