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nihil
Thanks for the update...very glad to hear everything checks out OK!
Please do continue to watch for anything unusual going on, like I described in my post.
It took months for some of my symptoms to show up.
Dave
 

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Wishing a speedy recovery. Hopefully will be strafing that corner in fine style once you can exchange the Bledsoe for a normal riding boot 61kLM+7Wv8L._SY355_.jpg
 

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Ninil, I hope you heal up quickly. Thanks for posting your story. i actually enjoy reading about other people's crashes. It helps me and others learn what to do or not do to avoid future crashes of our own. So, please excuse my question but I gotta ask.

You said "when I'm approaching the corner you can see a bit of a wobble where I lock up the rear. Entirely normal, I do it almost every time right there in the same spot, but this time it rode out a bit longer and I remember thinking "I don't normally skid that far, I must be going faster than usual"."

Am I understanding you correctly? Do you actually lock up your rear wheel routinely when corning on the street?
 

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Nihil - hope you recover quickly. That was definitely rear tire traction loss. If you ride mostly on road a TW203 and 204 would possibly help situations like that, but only on perfect road conditions. Main thing is I hope you get riding again soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Ninil, I hope you heal up quickly. Thanks for posting your story. i actually enjoy reading about other people's crashes. It helps me and others learn what to do or not do to avoid future crashes of our own. So, please excuse my question but I gotta ask.

You said "when I'm approaching the corner you can see a bit of a wobble where I lock up the rear. Entirely normal, I do it almost every time right there in the same spot, but this time it rode out a bit longer and I remember thinking "I don't normally skid that far, I must be going faster than usual"."

Am I understanding you correctly? Do you actually lock up your rear wheel routinely when corning on the street?
Not quite. I don't lock up the rear intentionally "when cornering on the street". I do lock it up with some regularity in some situations though. For that particular corner, being as tight as it is, the approach involves laying on the brakes and a downshift, which will frequently lock it up in a very benign and predictable manner before turning in. I also find that locking it up to swing the ass around the corner in my driveway that goes around the small garage to be great fun when returning from a ride.

Nihil - hope you recover quickly. That was definitely rear tire traction loss. If you ride mostly on road a TW203 and 204 would possibly help situations like that, but only on perfect road conditions. Main thing is I hope you get riding again soon.
Thanks. The thing about going to a more streetable on-road tire for me is that I also like to get it deep in the off-road muck when I get where I'm going. There is no grail tire for my particular habits unfortunately.
 

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Gnarly hope u are recovering well and thanks for sharing it makes me want to ride like a grandpa haha. At least will be more careful 😉 Crashing does tend to do that but as the injuries fade so can the memory of it and before long we start pushing a little more again haha
 

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Truly sorry to see the accident, and glad you are recovering.

But, on the bright side, your camera work gets a solid 10 from me. The way you flash between yourself, the bike, and the road, over and over, and then at the end, you send the camera under the bike for that dramatic shot.... It doesn’t even appear to be CGI. I’ll never understand how you did that!

Steven Spielberg has competition.
 

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Watching this linked video until the end (even if you watched it before) is well wort it (for everyone) as a refresher. I had watched your video, excellent work by the way. I didn't want to comment as to what the cause of your crash may have been though. I relate to myself in those situations, it's generally "I f'd up one way or another" and it could have either been completely avoided, or at a minimum, recovered before some damage presented itself. Good riding technique not only comes from experience and practice but from training (self or otherwise), especially where it's related to breaking bad habits or remembering and reacting quickly enough the techniques to avoid or recover before you're hurt. When I haven't ridden in a while (few weeks) I have a mental checklist of techniques I run through. It helps. Hope your recovering well ;)

Try to watch before commenting, it may change perspective.





Not quite. I don't lock up the rear intentionally "when cornering on the street". I do lock it up with some regularity in some situations though. For that particular corner, being as tight as it is, the approach involves laying on the brakes and a downshift, which will frequently lock it up in a very benign and predictable manner before turning in. I also find that locking it up to swing the ass around the corner in my driveway that goes around the small garage to be great fun when returning from a ride.


Thanks. The thing about going to a more streetable on-road tire for me is that I also like to get it deep in the off-road muck when I get where I'm going. There is no grail tire for my particular habits unfortunately.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Gnarly hope u are recovering well and thanks for sharing it makes me want to ride like a grandpa haha. At least will be more careful 😉 Crashing does tend to do that but as the injuries fade so can the memory of it and before long we start pushing a little more again haha
Thanks, I'm hobbling around a bit more quickly and a good portion of the overall body soreness has worn off. Sometimes it's nice to have reminders to not do stupid things that aren't a direct result of you doing stupid things.


Truly sorry to see the accident, and glad you are recovering.

But, on the bright side, your camera work gets a solid 10 from me. The way you flash between yourself, the bike, and the road, over and over, and then at the end, you send the camera under the bike for that dramatic shot.... It doesn’t even appear to be CGI. I’ll never understand how you did that!

Steven Spielberg has competition.
Went the extra mile to get the shot, and somehow the camera managed to come out of it completely unscathed! Fortunately it was separated from the helmet when it did the tumbling, else I'd probably still be a bit more sore than I am.


Watching this linked video until the end (even if you watched it before) is well wort it (for everyone) as a refresher. I had watched your video, excellent work by the way. I didn't want to comment as to what the cause of your crash may have been though. I relate to myself in those situations, it's generally "I f'd up one way or another" and it could have either been completely avoided, or at a minimum, recovered before some damage presented itself. Good riding technique not only comes from experience and practice but from training (self or otherwise), especially where it's related to breaking bad habits or remembering and reacting quickly enough the techniques to avoid or recover before you're hurt. When I haven't ridden in a while (few weeks) I have a mental checklist of techniques I run through. It helps. Hope your recovering well ;)

Try to watch before commenting, it may change perspective.
I can tell you exactly what caused it. 100% rider error :D

That's a fun video I hadn't seen before though, thanks for linking it. The bad 80's acting is great while still being informative. Somewhat of a Stapler Farher Klaus for two-wheelers with a bit less work for the makeup department.
 

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It broke free before that cover. From the outside of the approach, my usual line to the apex runs just inside/to the right of the cover.
If you pause the vid @ :16 you'll see a White'ish colored object right in your path (in front of your front rack) about 3' before that patch/man-hole cover. Think you're right.... lost the rear. Just as you rolled on the throttle, and appear to run over that object, engine revs up a bit while you lose traction, and down goes rider!! That was what 'ya kinda call a "highside" with exception you weren't launched vertically.... more fell over. Be thankful you were.... could've been much worse! :D

Glad you were okay.... for the most part! :icon_thumleft:
 

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That spot on the road at the point of the fall almost looks like a manhole cover to me.
It was a loss of traction on a manhole cover, and the corresponding reacquisition of traction after spinning off of it that resulted in a fall for me once. I tried to power through it like you would in the dirt, but once traction came back, the bike snapped back and launched me high side.
I am exceedingly cautious of manhole covers now.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Almost nothing, that's definitely a manhole cover. If you check out the traction break detail follow-up video though, you can see the point where the ass starts to swing out, and that the manhole cover is just forward and left of the bike. My preferred line for that corner runs just inside the manhole cover.

I hear ya though, I'm not a fan of manhole covers, painted stripes, grass clippings, or unexpected gravel. The worst I had was when I stumbled across what I can only describe as the trail left by a leaking tanker truck that was transporting Kentucky Jelly. I was on an early 80's GS1100, and while I somehow managed to keep it upright, I was slipping side to side with both wheels for about 1/8th of a mile before I was able to turn off. Even the cars were sliding around on that one.
 
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