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Discussion Starter #1
I finally bought the pannier system for my T'Dub's rear CycleRack. It is a really easy installation - a few holes to drill in your bags and few nuts and bolts to hold them on and then it's a simple hook on. This system is nice because it allows for an easy removal to service the rear, or simply if you don't need to run the bags for a while.



CycleRack has improved its design by replacing their original (and very cheesy) trucker tarp band with a better nylon strap & quick disconnect buckle. A great improvement!



Since mine is a working ranch bike not intended to have any fun with (that's the story I told my wife and I'm sticking with it), carrying "stuff" into the backwoods is pretty much a must. I have racks front and rear (yes, the front rack is useful since I pretty much only use it when I'm off-road (chainsaw tools, small gas can, and chain oil and it's a great spot for my cheepo manual can mounted on the bottom).



Once installed, I noticed that the front double-S hook was under little or no pressure with my bags empty and I suspect that it would rattle like the devil on my redwoods trails. Here's the mount - you can see the new strap to the back side of this right side mount.





Loose as a goose.





I decided that I'd put some tubing on the metal hook to eliminate the metal to metal contact. I dug in my crap - uh, treasures - and located some old 1/4 inch soft tubing and used some dish soap as a slide agent to slip it over the tubing - sounds easier than it was though.







Put some soap & a few drops of water down the tubing:





And coat the SS hook with a bit of soap helps too:





Use rags to push and pull the tubing onto the hook - it goes on slowly but it will work:





Here's the finished product:

 

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Discussion Starter #2
I'm cheap - I pulled the bags off my old mountain bike - too old to ride a bicycle in these hills anymore anyway. They hold a fair amount of stuff, they're tough, they hook onto the mount in three ways, they're ultra-light, and you can use a marker to black-out Schwinn's name.











Since this really is a working bike - honest honey, I never have ANY fun on this thing - I added a Moose Racing chainsaw mount on the rear rack. This thing works like a receiver hitch and can be adapted to mount lots of stuff besides a saw. I love to use this instead of my old CJ5 to get me way back in the woods and off the trails when something needs cuttin up.







I bought CycleRack's fuel can Pannier mounts instead of the simple bag system. This allows me to leave my bags in place and mount a Kolpin Fuel Pack Junior on the inside, next to the tire. The can and mount will be coming in today - $38.35 through Amazon. Pix later.
 

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Looks great. Now I've got some things to tack on to the future list of wants. Definitely take some pics of the fuel setup when it gets in.
 

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...

I decided that I'd put some tubing on the metal hook to eliminate the metal to metal contact. ...
Nice job! Well done sir. They should come that way




I have used hairspray in a similar manner. Slicks up nice while wet and drys stuck. Great for installing hand grips. A little water sprayed inside will break it down for removal if needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I told you, I'm cheap! The trunk on my bike is an old DeWalt drill box with the logo sanded off.







I used a heated putty knife to cut out all the inside dividers and fastened it on with cable ties.







The box gives me room to store a first aid kit & four bungees, and I still have room for lots of mail (I'm a mile down a rocky mountain road from my mailbox) or whatever on errands to town.







Continuing with the cheapness theme, I mounted a tube, made from 3 inch ABS drain and waste pipe, a cap, a female slip to screw fitting, and a cap, total about $2.00 since I had the pipe laying around. I mounted it on the bottom of the back rack but found it got in the way there so it went up front outboard of the fender's movement. The second tube I'll soon make will mount on the other side and will likely house a few tools.



 

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Discussion Starter #6
Nice job! Well done sir. They should come that way




Thanks HenryJ. (do you own one or is that your name - cool cars from long ago) I have used hairspray in a similar manner. Slicks up nice while wet and drys stuck. Great for installing hand grips. A little water sprayed inside will break it down for removal if needed.


The detergent also drys hard and stays slippery a bit longer than I've found hair spray to do. I also use it on hand grips. A quick trick I've used over the years on hand grip removal is to insert the tip of a pencil tipped air gun under the inside edge of the grip and hold the grip's rubber closed around it. The grip blows up slightly like a balloon and slips right off.
 

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Thanks HenryJ. (do you own one or is that your name - cool cars from long ago)
I do own one: Hotrodder's Garage







Good trick with the air pressure. I have done that too. Even smacking the end offers a burst of air pressure to help the install.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hairspray was good for roofing. A little Aquanet to dry on the boots before you get on slick metal.


Wow! How did you know that I'll be finishing metal roofing my ranch house this month? I started the project last year, ending up with a lot of construction that had to be done/redone on this 100+ year old house. I WILL use your suggestion for spraying the boots - how often to you have to respray to keep it slippery?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I do own one: Hotrodder's Garage





Good trick with the air pressure. I have done that too. Even smacking the end offers a burst of air pressure to help the install.


Very cool machine - Always loved the cheeky good looks of that motor.
 

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Wow! How did you know that I'll be finishing metal roofing my ranch house this month? I started the project last year, ending up with a lot of construction that had to be done/redone on this 100+ year old house. I WILL use your suggestion for spraying the boots - how often to you have to respray to keep it slippery?


Well, don't spray it at all for slippery




But I guess about every 6 hours or so? Once in the morning, and maybe once at lunch time if it starts slipping. My old man kept a separate pair of boots to avoid getting ground material on there and then losing grip on the roof. Once he got up there, he stayed there quite awhile though.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, don't spray it at all for slippery




But I guess about every 6 hours or so? Once in the morning, and maybe once at lunch time if it starts slipping. My old man kept a separate pair of boots to avoid getting ground material on there and then losing grip on the roof. Once he got up there, he stayed there quite awhile though.


I do that too with the "special roofing shoes", I spent a bit of time in the shoe department pulling shoes across a piece of metal to find the grippiest soles.



Thanks for the time line tip on the hair spray.
 

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Guess I'm kind of cheap as well. Have found a couple of these in 'thrift/second hand' stores for cheap. I use a Dremel tool to clean out the molded inside. Gerry









Another unit just waiting to be put to use.









 

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Discussion Starter #14
Guess I'm kind of cheap as well.




Very nice! I've tried the Dremel tool route too but found it a bit of a pain - the heated putty knife was a ton faster and did a pretty nice job too. I'd like more space in my box but I don't think I could gracefully swing my leg over one any taller than the one I put on - even though I'm getting older, I still worry about the cool factor when I'm on a bike.
 

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Yea, the issue about getting your leg to the other side of the machine was not in my thinking. It is certainly an issue to be reckoned with
. Gerry
 

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OHHHHH I NEED THAT... for what I have no clue, but if all the off road lifted 2500 SUV guys can drive around town with a winch, high lift jack and a shovel on their racks... how cool would it be to pull up with a chainsaw on mine? rock paper scissors ... chainsaw wins!
 

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I wouldn't ride to far on pavement with that chainsaw in place.

Some cop will give you a ticket for an obstructed tail light, and tag.
 

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Yea, the issue about getting your leg to the other side of the machine was not in my thinking. It is certainly an issue to be reckoned with
. Gerry
In as much as the side stand will hold your weight and as long as you're on stable ground, step up onto the low side peg first, then swing your leg over. I had to do that on the full dress cruiser after I hurt my lower back. I couldn't throw my leg over the trunk otherwise.
 

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Discussion Starter #19




OHHHHH I NEED THAT... for what I have no clue, but if all the off road lifted 2500 SUV guys can drive around town with a winch, high lift jack and a shovel on their racks... how cool would it be to pull up with a chainsaw on mine? rock paper scissors ... chainsaw wins!


Right on!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
In as much as the side stand will hold your weight and as long as you're on stable ground, step up onto the low side peg first, then swing your leg over. I had to do that on the full dress cruiser after I hurt my lower back. I couldn't throw my leg over the trunk otherwise.


Yeah, well that's what I have to do to get over my little box - told you, getting older sux!
 
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