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Discussion Starter #1
Everyone,

I had intended on doing a ride report on my trip from Fairbanks to the Denali Highway and back for a fishing trip with friends, but I hit a snag in the middle of the trip. As I tried to force my overloaded TW through the mud hole that used to be the trail to the fishing camp, I got stuck. Horribly stuck. I unloaded the bike, and then proceeded to try to remove myself from the mud. When I let out the clutch and revved the engine, I heard three loud bangs come from the bottom of the engine, and then the rear wheel stopped. The engine was still running just fine, but with the clutch out, no movement. I eventually got the bike out a couple of hours later with the help of some friends, and left it there overnight. When I started it the next day, it was still running fine, but the clutch did nothing. I could shift it through all the gears, and no movement in any gear. I could see the engine oil through the site glass had turned dark brown, but I could not see any metal, and the engine was still running smooth. When I wheeled it to the meat trailer to haul it out, it popped a couple of more times, from somewhere at the base of the motor. After we hauled it out, I rolled it up to the trailer and it did the same thing.

After I unloaded it back in Fairbanks, it rolled along smoothly with the clutch pulled in, and there is just a little drag with the clutch released and bike is in neutral. I assumed that I had destroyed the clutch, but the more I think about it, I'm afraid that I have done something much worse. I am draining the oil tonight and pulling the clutch side case cover to see what damage is visible. Anyone have any idea what I might have done to my poor bike?

-Joe
 

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You KILLED ii , but your about to find out its not as bad as you thought . Bet its the primary gear
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The primary gear makes more sense, as I look at the repair manual. The banging would have been the key shearing, and then catching a couple more times before it was sheared smooth. How hard is it to get into the primary gear to pull it and replace the key?
 

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As it seems you know what you are talking about it should be easy for you to see when you pull the clutch
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I pulled the clutch last night, and it turns out that the clutch was the culprit. There was nothing left of it. All the material that creates the friction on the plates was in the oil or caked to the outside of the clutch housing. A piece of plastic that plugs into the case on the left side behind the stator came out and was chewed up in the chain. That's what created the banging sound. So even though I did my best to destroy my beloved TW, she's in good shape. New clutch parts are on the way, and I should have her running in about a week. This bike amazes me more and more all the time. I've owned others that would not take the abuse that I've put this thing through. I think maybe its time that I stop trying to take it into places that even four wheelers have a difficult to impossible time with.
 

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Glad to hear that your "tough little mudder" wasn't seriously hurt and will be up and running soon!
 

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Even when it breaks, it's usually an inexpensive part that can be replaced.

I love this bike!

:D
 

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You have learned a very valuable lesson, at a fairly inexpensive cost. Everything has it's limits, and anything that rolls on wheels or tracks, can, and will get stuck; usually at the worst possible time, or place. I learned that lesson myself, a long time ago, when I was out in rough country with one of my old Jeeps. A five mile walk home covered in mud, and cold as hell. I guess I looked so bad, that no one would stop and give me a ride. Didn't have mobile phones back then. I had to pay for a D9 catapillar to come out, and pull it out of the muck.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well, changed the clutch and upgraded to the Barnett friction plates and springs. The clutch is much smoother now, and shifting is greatly improved too. I didn't realize just how bad the old clutch was. Although I'm sure I destroyed it pushing it much harder than I should have, I wonder if there wasn't a lingering problem in the bike from the previous owner. The engine is running much quieter now, and smoother too. After I put everything together, I pushed the starter and she took right off. I rode around the block, shifted through every gear, no problems. Great little bike!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You have learned a very valuable lesson, at a fairly inexpensive cost. Everything has it's limits, and anything that rolls on wheels or tracks, can, and will get stuck; usually at the worst possible time, or place. I learned that lesson myself, a long time ago, when I was out in rough country with one of my old Jeeps. A five mile walk home covered in mud, and cold as hell. I guess I looked so bad, that no one would stop and give me a ride. Didn't have mobile phones back then. I had to pay for a D9 catapillar to come out, and pull it out of the muck.
I always make sure that I never ride out by myself farther than I'm willing to walk. Too many times as a kid I had to walk back to the farm from some far-off field because something broke or I decided to get stuck. I'm a good walker.
 
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