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2021 TW200, first motorcycle
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have less than 100 miles on my bike and got a new chain in finally after several Amazon slip ups.

Is there a quick and easy way to link both chains together so I don't have to replace a gasket and feed the new one around the sprocket? I figure I don't need a full swap with sprockets since my mileage is so low.
 

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Sure, just connect the top run of the old chain to the new chain together using a master link. You don't even need to use the plate or clip. Then with the transmission in neutral, pull the lower run of the old chain to the rear of the bike until the new chain is accessible. Then remove the old chain and connect the new chain using the new master link.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sure, just connect the top run of the old chain to the new chain together using a master link. You don't even need to use the plate or clip. Then with the transmission in neutral, pull the lower run of the old chain to the rear of the bike until the new chain is accessible. Then remove the old chain and connect the new chain using the new master link.
Yeah it was way easier than I thought. Ziptied the old chain to the rear sprocket til I had the new one linked up and let her rip. The clip sucked but meh.
 

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I had no problem simply feeding the new chain through and around the front sprocket after having already completely removed the stock chain, and I have huge hands.
 

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Helps if one’s bike is as vertical as possible when feeding new chain on sprockets. The zip-tie technique is good for determining where to cut chain of necessary as well as for then installing masterlink.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Helps if one’s bike is as vertical as possible when feeding new chain on sprockets. The zip-tie technique is good for determining where to cut chain of necessary as well as for then installing masterlink.
It took me two minutes to put the chain on and 20 minutes to get the damn clip to seat
 

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Helps if one’s bike is as vertical as possible when feeding new chain on sprockets. The zip-tie technique is good for determining where to cut chain of necessary as well as for then installing masterlink.
Ahh yes, I had my bike in a hydraulic lift at the time.

It took me two minutes to put the chain on and 20 minutes to get the damn clip to seat
Same here, I ended up having to use a little C-clamp to get the damn link in all the way so that the clip channels were revealed.
 

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It took me two minutes to put the chain on and 20 minutes to get the damn clip to seat
Only twenty minutes on your first attempt is nothing to be ashamed of if you had NOT the present and perfect tool for the job.

Now, if a cuss word or two was included, then I must say,

"Only twenty minutes on your first attempt is nothing to be ashamed of if you had not the present and perfect tool for the job."

But then, I repeat myself damn it!

Marty
 

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Ahh yes, I had my bike in a hydraulic lift at the time.


Same here, I ended up having to use a little C-clamp to get the damn link in all the way so that the clip channels were revealed.
The little c-clamp is the trick I use.
 

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Needle-nose vice grips are the trick!
 

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It took me two minutes to put the chain on and 20 minutes to get the damn clip to seat
Try doing it outside in freezing cold. 😆
Next up is to snap on the link's retaining clip. Every time I do this, it's 15 minutes of dropping it, trying to squeeze the link tight enough with pliers in one hand, positioning the clip with the other hand, while using a screwdriver in the third hand to pry it onto the pins. I'm always surprised when the seventh time doing the exact same thing suddenly works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Only twenty minutes on your first attempt is nothing to be ashamed of if you had NOT the present and perfect tool for the job.

Now, if a cuss word or two was included, then I must say,

"Only twenty minutes on your first attempt is nothing to be ashamed of if you had not the present and perfect tool for the job."

But then, I repeat myself damn it!

Marty
My problem is the clip came a little bent where the two prongs meet. So getting it to line up right without bending the rest of it to oblivion was the challenge.
 

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My problem is the clip came a little bent where the two prongs meet. So getting it to line up right without bending the rest of it to oblivion was the challenge.
Carefully bend the clip back straight.
 

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I broke two clips putting mine on. Little buggers. Teeny-tiny C-clamp worked for me. Needle nose vice-grips did not. So teeny-tiny C-clamp goes into the tool pouch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I broke two clips putting mine on. Little buggers. Teeny-tiny C-clamp worked for me. Needle nose vice-grips did not. So teeny-tiny C-clamp goes into the tool pouch.
I took a c clamp and bent the cup so the pressure is put directly on the pins on the back side of the master and on the plate only on the front side. $2 HDX brand fix.
 

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I took a c clamp and bent the cup so the pressure is put directly on the pins on the back side of the master and on the plate only on the front side. $2 HDX brand fix.
I just popped the cup socket off off the ball, and used the ball to fit between the pins on the removable plate side. Same idea.
 

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I installed an x-ring chain this past weekend. It took me about 4 hours. Yikes! Comedy of errors. Got it done though.

In the end, I found pressing the plate down to be much easier if you install the plate, hold a nut over the pin, and then use channel locks to tighten down the plate. Switch back and forth between the pins to apply pressure evenly. This worked much better than my attempts using a c-clamp.

Shout out to the guy at Larsons Cycle in Cambridge, MN for giving me that idea.
 
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