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Discussion Starter #1
So in the last few weeks I got in over my hub in mud on two occasions. Both times I got fine dirt in it that screeches so I took off my wheel to clean it out. Taking my wheel off is a PITA I'd rather avoid.

A few questions...

1 - Is there an easier way to clean it?

2- Is there a way to prevent it getting in?

3- Should I just avoid deep mud if I don't want to get into deep cleaning?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Doh! I didn't REALLY like that response but such is life. Better to know the inconvenient truths.

I was hoping maybe a pressure washer might blow it out or that the drum seals needed replacing or something of that sort. I haven't had this problem till I switched to an older modded hub and thought it may be related. I guess I haven't been deep enough in thick enough mud to notice.
 

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TW, this won't answer what you asked but might help.
It won't keep mud & water out but it does help "manage" it, to a degree.

In the 70's I used to race Hare Scrambles in SE Texas, fine red sand & frequent water & mud in the National Forests.
My '73 Penton (KTM) 175 Jackpiner had drums on both ends...they all did.

Some of the ISDT/ISDE boys used to "cherry pick" us local yokels when they were going home from National Qualifiers in the SE USA.
I liked to pick up one of them when they'd pass me and just watch how they rode.
I'd do that until I crashed, or picked up a slower one as he passed me.

I learned a lot doing that and sometimes other things in the pits.

What they were doing with their Pentons w/drums is before they mounted fresh brake shoes, they would take a medium triangle file and cut diagonal slots across the face of the shoes about an inch apart and about 3/16 deep.
They couldn't keep water & muck out either, but the grooves would channel it out of the shoe material pretty well. I started doing the same and it helped a LOT!
I didn't clean or replace the shoes until they were worn down, several races later.
But I did blast out the muck after each race or ride when it was real wet or muddy, then blow out with compressed air..

I kept all that under my hat except for my racing partner...his 250 Husky benefited, too!
I made him buy the beer for a month! ;)
 

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I try to avoid pressure washing anything with bearings. If I do I’m real carful to stay away from sensitive areas. The high pressure water can get injected past the bearing seals and into the bearing. This includes the swing arm bearings, wheel bearings, steering head bearings etc.
It might be an easy way to clean your bike, but bearing life will suffer.
 

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Hey, EBC stole my idea!
Not really, but since it is EBC shoes I'd jump on 'em.

Hey, Gas...you're absolutely right, of course.
But...I didn't have a pressure washer, only a thumb over the end of the hose.
And we found some cool wheel bearings that had rubber seals over the ball races.
Still, not the best way to go, I should have mentioned that.
Thanks for the catch!
 

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Any time I ever stuck it in deep mud the very next thing I looked for was a clean stream deep enough to ride through a few times and clean it out. Dirty water can get in so clean water can get most of it out as long as you don't allow the crud to dry inside.

GaryL
 

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You may find that the squeal is caused by “sintered” pads – eg the metal content of the brake shoes

If you get the squeal the same day, flush out as above (as best you can), or try the grooved option, as this will shift the debris from the contact surfaces

If you get the squeal the next day, it’s entirely possible that it’s just surface rust on the metal content of the shoes, which will simply wear off with use. If this is the case, attempting to flush the hub will effectively do nothing to help …..
 
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