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I own one. In concept they are a great idea... In practice, I'd rather have a hatchet. In my experience, it basically boils down to the teeth trying to cut/grab too much wood at once during the pulling motion. It is also a very uneven (jerky) motion while pulling the blade(s) through the wood. Even a cross cut or ripsaw would be a much easier to use choice.

Most powered chainsaws that I've ever seen were around 3+hp. Here is an excerpt from a website where human power was studied:

"A person can generate four times more power (1/4 horsepower (hp)) by pedaling than by hand-cranking. At the rate of 1/4hp, continuous pedaling can be done for only short periods, about 10 minutes. However, pedaling at half this power (1/8 hp) can be sustained for around 60 minutes. Pedal power enables a person to drive devices at the same rate as that achieved by hand-cranking, but with far less effort and fatigue. Pedal power also lets one drive devices at a faster rate than before (e.g. winnower), or operate devices that require too much power for hand-cranking (e.g. thresher)."

Please do try it though, I'd love to hear your thoughts on it.
 

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I own one. In concept they are a great idea... In practice, I'd rather have a hatchet. In my experience, it basically boils down to the teeth trying to cut/grab too much wood at once during the pulling motion. It is also a very uneven (jerky) motion while pulling the blade(s) through the wood. Even a cross cut or ripsaw would be a much easier to use choice
This makes sense. Thinking about using a chainsaw chain, a couple of things come to mind. One is what you said about the effort required to overcome the tooth grab. The other is that, unless you sharpen the back sides of the teeth, it will only cut in one direction. At the cabin I use a small folding pruning saw and a hatchet to clear shooting lanes or whatever. It probably would work in survival situations to cut small firewood but not much bigger than 7 or 8 inches. I digress, this thread is more about a tool to carry on TW where space is valuable so I'll leave this up for disucussion. Maybe a little quality cable saw would be worth throwing in the kit for rides into desolate places.
 

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I've never used a cable saw but I'm sure it'd be easier to use. The chain type saw I have was purchased from an outdoor goods store and I used it once. It has teeth that grab in either direction so it cuts both ways. It just wore me out cutting 1 8-10" log. Comparing the gas/electric chainsaw vs. using the chain and your hands is like this: with the chainsaw, you're applying minimal pressure to each of the teeth when you factor in how fast the chain is moving... with pulling, you're much more pressure with much less chain movement and it's trying to move more wood because of that pressure. On this note, I thought about it for a minute. If I were to cut down a sapling, arch it to create a lighweight compact bowsaw... Now we're talkin'! That just might work.
 

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For those of us who ride in heavily forested areas, this gizmo could come in very handy.
Hikers, campers, too.
I've had one for years. Not a DIY, but got it in some camping or surplus store. It's otherwise identical. I've used it to cut a 12 inch tree across the trail when there was no alternative but to turn back 20 miles. It took a LONG time!;)
I also used it occasionally to cut 2-3 inch branches for a campfire, worked just fine for that. It was part of my airplane survival kit, and it now is part of my permanent TW kit. It came in a little tin just slightly bigger than a Copenhagen tin.

For normal camping I have a Sven saw, which cuts about four times as fast as this thing.
 

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Many years ago I had a cable saw, an inexpensive one with keychain type rings at each end. It cut extremely well, maybe a little too aggressive. I jammed dowels through the rings for handles and that worked until the rings stretched. It helped considerably to have 2 people to use it. Was so sharp I had to make a heavy leather pouch so it wouldn't damage the other gear in the pack.

About 3 years ago I needed to equip the Argo amphib with brush whacking equipment- we were headed into a windfall area that was choked with downed trees & dense understory. Space was tight so I chose 4 small tools: 1. a Stihl T192 arborist's chainsaw, small enough to fit on the TW front rack, but amazingly powerful; 2. a very aggressive 28" pruner's hand saw, curved; 3. a Polaski (combo axe and hoe); 4. a 28" machete. The pruning hand saw, machete, and polaski got the most use. We would have used the T192 more, but could only carry a limited quantity of fuel.

I carry the pruning saw on the TW pretty often. It will go through a 12" log with lots of exercise. If the purpose of the trip is to log out a trail, it's the 192 on the front rack with half a gallon of gas.
 

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Easier and way faster cutting is to just go spend $14 on a stanley 15" carpenter saw. Easily fits in a backpack, or tucks under a stock tw rear rack. Cuts super fast. 3-4 inch tree in like 45 seconds. 6-8 inch in maybe 2 or 3 minutes.
 

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