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Do you work on your TW? Do you enjoy it?

  • YES I work on my TW, YES I enjoy it.

    Votes: 85 84.2%
  • NO I don't have time/energy to work on my TW, but YES I would enjoy it.

    Votes: 3 3.0%
  • YES I work on my TW, NO I don't enjoy it.

    Votes: 11 10.9%
  • NO I don't work on my TW, NO I don't enjoy it.

    Votes: 2 2.0%

  • Total voters
    101
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I'm wonder how many of you do your own work when you're able, and do you or do you not enjoy working on your bikes?

I like having work done on my TW but would rather suffer through doing the work myself (when I can), then pay someone even if I trusted them.

Vote, comment...etc.:)
 

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I do all work, at all times. For better or worse lol. I learn from others and let others learn from my mistakes, but also my experience and successes. I’ve been wrenching a long time. Every time someone else touches my machines they usually screw something up. I’d rather screw it up and learn how to do it right.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Having an extra set of hands relieves some frustration. Especially putting tires back on...

Also having an organized shop and all the tools/supplies needed layed out and ready.

Motorized bicycle carbs were easy to access and not hard to work on though very delicate...I didn't mind that so much so I'm hoping the TW carb is no harder to deal with.

Having my only bike apart gives me a little anxiety.
 

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I do all my own work including changing the tires. About the only thing I shy away from is getting to deep into the engine. I’ll do the kick starter addition, adjust the valves, change a piston/rings or replace a head gasket, but digging into the guts of the motor isn’t something I’m interested in any more. It’s mostly because of the new way things are assembled. The tolerances are too critical and more times than not some a spring goes a flyin’ when I remove a cover or something.
I am real particular about who works on my equipment as well. For what they charge, around $100 an hour, it better be top notch.
TW carbs are about as simple as they can possibly be. Just get a carb diagram, use the proper tools, and lay the parts out in the order they were removed and you can hardly go wrong.
 

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If I’ve got one or two things to do to the bike I’ll get stuck in – but if there’s a bucket load of stuff I simply haven’t got time to deal with, (like the last time I moved house just after getting the TW200, when the cat got mauled by the Doberman and the windscreen on the car cracked – long story) I’ll farm it out, but only to a place I trust (and only as far as I can throw them)

It boils down to “how practical” is me doing the work, as opposed to how practical is getting someone else to do it. Tires, I cannot do, I’m simply not set up for it

“Once upon a time”, I had a Honda VT250F. After a crash in the middle of London, (Baker Street), and having hit it into a skip, upside down, at speed, I sourced a new frame, and single-handedly had the lot sorted out in 24 hours. That kind of stuff I can do. Re-building the top end of a Suzi GT550 is easy, changing the clutch on a Kawasaki GT550 is simples, but if I had a mushroomed valve on the TW I would probably let someone else do it

“If” I had a carb problem on the TW, I would simply remove it, take it indoors, and much to disgust of my wife, re-build the thing. Removing the engine, although simple in itself, followed by the top end, would perhaps “strain” the relationship. My “garage” room is severely restricted, so, it comes down to what is “practical”, rather than what is within my capabilities.

Do I enjoy it ? – yeah – “tinkering around” with this stuff is a hobby of mine. But knowing when you’ve bitten off more than you can chew is equally as important, either in terms of difficulty, or in terms of diagnosis. When it comes to diagnosis, typically on here, is it the carb, the boots, the stator, or the CDI, or as simple as something like an ignition coil ?

Trying to pin this stuff down is notoriously difficult, especially if it’s not your bike, and you’re trying to read in-between the lines as to what any OP is telling you. Sometimes, throwing the problem at a third party shop, who is going to do it “by the book”, one step at a time, (who can’t charge you for a part that’s been proved you don’t need, such as a CDI), makes a lot of sense. And this is another reason for “farming” out the work

Like I said – do what you can, and accept what you (personally) can’t – it all comes back to “what’s practical”. On a project bike my opinion may differ, but when you’re burning riding time it’s not so funny …..
 

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TW -

My God, woman...after always reading your posts (always interesting, often helpful), I'd say that little carby will be a real piece o' cake! Just use JIS screwdrivers and watch that damn tiny spring that hops around like a grasshopper just before it disappears forever!
The official Yamaha parts schematics in Partzilla.com and other vendors are your best friends. And the pro-quality TK carb images here on the Forum from member jbfla are *very* helpful.
I'm surprised and impressed at some of the things you do & your attitudes toward riding...and please do not take that as any kind of "pretty good for a girl" BS comment. It's not.
If you can think it, you can do it!

I probably should put this in a PM, or not ask at all but...I & others I'm sure, would be interested in knowing something of your background.
Education, experience, job/profession, etc.
And "No Reply" would be perfectly understandable...:cool:

PS - Yes, I do most of my own work.
But I do farm out tire changes, welding, final suspension tuning, paint, upholstery and most metal polishing.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I guess I should take another moment give some motive here...

My TW is running well. But with some recent posts problem solving carb and valve issues and the like....I wondered how many of us are rolling up our sleeves. I'm a bit of a prepper and prefer to be as independent as possible.

I do farm (chickens, vegetables)...but haven't been back to the dealership since they sold me the wrong oil filter and saw other bad practices there since.
 

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Other than the day they were purchased my bikes have not seen a dealership. Never been to a mechanic either. A flat rear tire on a rim went to the dealership once ( a rather bad experience possibly unique to my local Yamaha shop) and have had two ATV tires spooned on a motorcycle accessory store.
Other than that I break and fix and break again counting on good advice here to steer me in the correct repair direction.
 

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And there's that old saying that if you want something done right, do it yourself.

One of the things you learn on the internet and on forums like this, is how to do it, if you didn't know that before. If you can read and study just a little bit, you can do anything with the knowledge you learn. Just do it.
And if you want to take the bike to the dealer, you can talk to them intelligently and not let them bamboozle you with garbage.
 

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I do all work on my TW myself. But being a mechanic for a living is both a blessing and a curse. It means I have the technical know how to do most jobs or at least figure it out. But also means working on the bike feels like work and I just don’t really enjoy it anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
I guess there is one way I enjoy working on my TW, and that is designing, and fabricating custom parts. I have a background in graphic design and art in general so any new medium that challenges my creativity is enjoyable to me.

It's stsrting to look like the last vote option are not as frequent on the site....I imagined that would be some of the adventure riding members who like sharing adventure stories/pics. I guess we'll likely see some votes there eventually.

It seems like one of the main reasons we're drawn to this little monster (aside from tires) is the ability to work on them ourselves.
 

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I spent 7 years as a m/c mechanic/service manager. Mechanics who are knowledgeable, conscientious and have a good work ethic are few and far between in my experience. In seven years I had only one that I would want working on my bike and that was after several years of training him. He went on to wrench for factory Suzuki national pro motocross riders for many years and just recently retired. My memory is not what it used to be but I've been riding since 1965 and I don't think any of my bikes have ever been to a shop. At least that I can remember.
 

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I work on my bike and I enjoy it, but dont have time. I'd love to have someone else work on it but the local guy that came highly recommended let me down.
So I would have loved to have my work done so that I could just enjoy the bike but instead I spent half my vacation wrenching.
 

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I guess there is one way I enjoy working on my TW, and that is designing, and fabricating custom parts. I have a background in graphic design and art in general so any new medium that challenges my creativity is enjoyable to me.
I hear ya!
Could you design a TW rear wheel that weighs less than a locomotive wheel? I'll be your first customer!
Wouldn't an aluminum alloy rear hoop be just wonderful?
 
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