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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2001 tw200 and was installing a new brake hose and cleaning out the reservoir. The piece pictured was in the reservoir when drained. I don't see it on any diagram and unsure of what it is. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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It looks like the same part that’s at the bottom of the reservoir. I don’t think there are supposed to be two of those parts in there. Are they the same size? Maybe prior owner replaced that part but left both old and new in there. Just a guess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
it doesn’t fit into the bottom, and it was the only one in there. i don’t see that part on any diagram either. is it even necessary?
 

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I have seen them on a number of bikes, it is an antislosh barrier to help keep the surface tension of the fluid tense, especially when level is lower. Clean it and reuse it.
"Antislosh"?? Wouldn't that be another word for Baffle? Baffles in tanks slow the product movement down in different directions, based on how their placed in reservoirs and tanks. This one, if it is in fact what you say it is, looks to be metal. If that's the case, then how would metal float on top of the fluid, to keep the "surface tension* at bay? Is this item hollow? Then I could see how it might float on the surface.
Scott
 

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It believe it is fiberglass, not metal. And it has the two "V" notches to allow it to travel up and down without becoming displaced.
 

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It's possible the "antislosh" feature comes in to play at only very low fluid levels, when air is most likely to be pulled in to the pickup during bumpy rides. It's not going to completely prevent air ingress... just slow it down.

Gosh darn it, now I have to pull my cover and peak inside to see if I even have that piece.
 

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2004 TW200, Jets 'n Shims, DGV2, Acerbis Guards, ProTaper KX, JNS LED BLK
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I have a 2001 tw200 and was installing a new brake hose and cleaning out the reservoir. The piece pictured was in the reservoir when drained. I don't see it on any diagram and unsure of what it is. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
View attachment 218950 View attachment 218951
Did you choose a rubber, or stainless braid hose? Happy with your choice? Thinking to replace mine on my 2004, due to age.
 
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I asked my friend (who is truly an expert), and he says that it is generally called a "float", and is usually found more commonly on off road bikes (and mountain bikes with hydraulic disk brakes). It is in fact designed to minimize sloshing with the goal of preventing the introduction of air to the fluid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
The part in question is stainless steel, and the brake line I used was a stainless steel braided one recommended on here from ebay. I would have purchased OEM but can't get those anymore. Unless the newer Tdub lines will work. (Didn't think about that)
 

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I think it is found in the old style reservoirs to protect the inlet hole from being obstructed if the diaphragm fails.
 

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When the pedal or lever activating a master cylinder is released, the fluid will spit back from the previously pressurized line out. So the sheetmetal piece keeps the little eruption in check. My guess anyway.
 

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"Antislosh"?? Wouldn't that be another word for Baffle? Baffles in tanks slow the product movement down in different directions, based on how their placed in reservoirs and tanks. This one, if it is in fact what you say it is, looks to be metal. If that's the case, then how would metal float on top of the fluid, to keep the "surface tension* at bay? Is this item hollow? Then I could see how it might float on the surface.
Scott
Now I am baffled...look at you getting all technical and stuff. All the baffles I have encountered in heavy industry are placed vertically, so maybe that threw me off.
 

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It works in conjunction with that rubber diaphragm. Keeps fluid from sloshing around and getting air bubbles.
 

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Now I am baffled...look at you getting all technical and stuff. All the baffles I have encountered in heavy industry are placed vertically, so maybe that threw me off.
"Baffled"....what crackup. Yep, about 99.99999% of the baffles in tanks of any type, ARE welded or mounted vertically to keep a product (think fuel tankers on the road) as stable as possible for oscillation. But, when I red the part about anti-sloshing, I just correlated it with baffling. Oh well.
Scott
 
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