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Discussion Starter #1
I put a Shinco tire on the front but but have been thinking of putting Dual Sport tires (bridgestone-tw204-trail-wing-dual-sport-rear-tire that look like street tires with deep groves) on front and rear. They look like they'd be good for paved and dirt roads but worthless in mud. I'm planning on staying on some kind of road or path and hope they would be quite and give better traction in the rain. What do you think? Thanks.
 

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I put a Shinco tire on the front but but have been thinking of putting Dual Sport tires (bridgestone-tw204-trail-wing-dual-sport-rear-tire that look like street tires with deep groves) on front and rear. They look like they'd be good for paved and dirt roads but worthless in mud. I'm planning on staying on some kind of road or path and hope they would be quite and give better traction in the rain. What do you think? Thanks.
I would think that you are on the right track. With proper inflation they should be superior in every regard on pavement "wet or dry". On solid base two tracks, aired down a bit they should hold a line just fine. Speed will be your enemy off pavement with them though so you would want to take it easy off road. My 2 cents worth.


Tom
 

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I put a Shinco tire on the front but but have been thinking of putting Dual Sport tires (bridgestone-tw204-trail-wing-dual-sport-rear-tire that look like street tires with deep groves) on front and rear. They look like they'd be good for paved and dirt roads but worthless in mud. I'm planning on staying on some kind of road or path and hope they would be quite and give better traction in the rain. What do you think? Thanks.
It's been said many times here. STAY OFF the WET GRASS with those tires. For just gravel road riding you will be fine. Just watch the corners and the wet grassy/leafy spots. Someone that uses those tire could give a little more inf.
 

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I use them front and rear on the road and I am very pleased with them. They have dropped the vibration level dramatically especially at highway speed. I am not fortunate to have any off road areas near me within riding distance, but I can attest to a great hard surface experience with these tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Tom,
I see you're on the other side of two lakes from me and are familiar with the terrain. I ride on the South end of Seneca and will turn around if things get too deep or steep.
Matt
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wet clay on top of frozen ground (lot of that around here in the Spring) is similar to wet grass and oiled teflon
 

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Oiled Teflon!! ha ha LOL
 

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Thanks Tom,
I see you're on the other side of two lakes from me and are familiar with the terrain. I ride on the South end of Seneca and will turn around if things get too deep or steep.
Matt
I have already been riding my TW all over Watkins Glen and Montour falls. Do you ever ride near Cayuta? There are a lot of great seasonal roads just east of there!


Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I belonged to the Schuyler county MC club (35 years ago) and put on National and International Trials events in Cayuta and Montour Falls. Haven't rode a dirt bike in about 20 years and the TW brings back fond memories. Those old logging trails are still there there from 100 years ago. The Schuyler County MC put on National Enduros in the old days.
 

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I havent had a need for the road tires. I can scrape my boots with the stock rear tire and sr244 on the front and go anywhere offroad that I want. Sounds like a win win to me.
 

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I belonged to the Schuyler county MC club (35 years ago) and put on National and International Trials events in Cayuta and Montour Falls. Haven't rode a dirt bike in about 20 years and the TW brings back fond memories. Those old logging trails are still there there from 100 years ago. The Schuyler County MC put on National Enduros in the old days.
Sounds like good times. I am more of a wildlife viewer on my TW:D Not against getting together someday for a ride if you want.


Tom
 

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My 06 Tdub has the original tires. Bridgestone Trail. I run 22 pounds in the front tire, 25 in the back. On a paved road the front tire makes a LOT of noise and the back tire is quiet. Is this normal?
 

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It is kind of noisy. Unless you are a big guy and over 200 lbs, you might try about 18 lbs front and rear according to the owners manual. If you are over 200 lbs, 22 and 25 are fine. You still want to air down off road for maximum traction. It makes a huge difference, like you are glued to the road. The original front tire is no good. Try a Shinko 244 or 241. Are the tires hardened from age or being out in the elements? You should be able to sink your thumbnail into it and leave a mark. The harder it gets, the louder it is.
 
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It is kind of noisy. Unless you are a big guy and over 200 lbs, you might try about 18 lbs front and rear according to the owners manual. If you are over 200 lbs, 22 and 25 are fine. You still want to air down off road for maximum traction. It makes a huge difference, like you are glued to the road. The original front tire is no good. Try a Shinko 244 or 241. Are the tires hardened from age or being out in the elements? You should be able to sink your thumbnail into it and leave a mark. The harder it gets, the louder it is.

I think you got it right. I weigh 168. I'll try letting some air out. However more than 90% of my riding is on dirt roads. Would the Shinko tire benefit me in that environment or would it specifically benefit me on pavement?
 

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Yeah, you have too much air in them. The Shinko is a huge improvement both on and off road, but ~especially
~ off road. Since you are 90% off road already, try 12-14 in the front and 15 in the back. You can go lower if the terrain and riding conditions are real bad and you need the traction. Experiment a little. Run a battery tender lead off the battery and hang it down by the right side plastic cover so that you can plug a little portable air pump into. If you have to ride much on the street, you can air them up easily. If the 10% street riding is just from the house to the trail, I'd leave it adjusted for the dirt. You are going to notice a big difference right now letting some air out. Softer ride on the bumps, better traction, but get a new front tire soon. $60 or so and worth every penny! A Shinko 244 or 241 in the 5.10 width.
 

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I used the shinko version (SR428) as they were cheaper. THey were great on the road and even fine offroad in the dried out july trails. it got muddy recently and i put the stock rear and a shinko golden boy up front.

If you want the SR428s I may be willing to sell mine. 400 miles. PM me if interested.

I'd sell them only because I think i'll stick with knobbies.
 

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I have the 428's on my bike, and I really like them. I'm only 125 pounds, and I can run them almost airless. I ride pavement with them at 18lbs front and rear, and I let the pressure down to about 6 or 8lbs, and they really perform. The only thing they won't handle well is this black gumbo that I have on my property. But even then with them aired down I can still climb up out of my bottom land. With this gumbo, nothing works good. I will add that I'm an old timer, and almost all of my bikes had either Dunlop or Pirelli universal tires on them. A couple had trials tires. I have never liked knobbies. I had a new '68 Suzuki 120 that had knobbies, and when i turned a corner in town a little to sharp at low speed, I was on my butt in the blink of an eye. I took those knobbies off, and have never used them since. I learned a long time ago that it's not the tires that keep you up; it's the rotating mass that does that(along with some skill, and daring). Hope this helps.

added 7-23-14: I would like to add that I have a new Shinko trials tire for the front, and a Cheng Shin nobbie for the rear for when I get back out to the west coast, and the Sierra Nevada's.
 
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