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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I love the 203/204 tires with a 15 front/47 rear sprocket for street riding. It really brings out the potential of the TW as a street bike. It cruises comfortably at 60 mph and is still “adequate” on easy trails. But, for a little more serious trail riding I found myself missing the stock rear tire and gearing. An upcoming trip to Moab later this month motivated me to get to work on a project I have been thinking about ever since I bought my TW last year. After about a month of looking I found a really nice rear wheel from a 1997 TW on Ebay. The brake drum is clean and the bearings seem nice and tight with no grease leakage. I know it would have been wise to go ahead and change the bearings anyway but I have never done the job, don’t have a bearing puller and that wheel is going to be off and on the bike a lot so I can change bearings later if needed. I already had the 50 tooth sprocket and stock tire so all I needed was a new tube and some stainless bolts. The stock length DID X-Ring chain on my bike works with both the 47 and 50 tooth rear sprocket.

When I was younger, in the pre-all season radial tire days, it was common for people around here to swap out their tires seasonally to “winter treads". Now I can swap out my rear wheel from street tire/gearing to off road whenever I want. For the first time I changed the wheels I timed myself. From sliding the floor jack under the bike to completion took me less than 20 minutes. I picked up a few tips and with some practice I bet I can do it in 10 minutes but heck, I’m not in a race!

View attachment Dual Rear Wheel-0000519.jpg

You know, I kinda like the looks of the silver rear rim!
 

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For Moab, you may want a bit more than 50 on the rear or drop the front down to 13.
Stock gearing can be a bit of a challenge on the tougher rides out there.
 

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+1 .
The ~6% change in going from 47 to 50 teeth seems almost inconsequential in affecting the bike's tendency to either wheelie or stall on Moab's vertical challenges. If you want to be comfortable and in control on the tougher routes then something like 13 x 55 sprockets would give you the needed time and torque to pick and complete your route. One can also maneuver better on the steeper downslopes with effective compression braking rather than have both brakes strongly engaged.
15 x 50 also seems like a poor combination for the looser sand sections too.
Keep the 15 x 50 if you like but if you want to tackle the jeep routes you will be struggling unnecessarily, may get stuck or unable to complete many sections, or come away a bit beat up or injured due to the minimum reasonable speed.
Good luck! Have fun and start out gentle.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I really do appreciate the well intended advice and I should probably explain a little bit more about my trip to Moab. I am not going there to challenge myself with the great trails there, I'm going for more of a photo op. I have loved the beauty of that area ever since I accidentally discovered it in 1985 while touring in a Top 40 band I was in and I love photography. I have been trying to photographically capture the beauty of that area for over 30 years on the trails in vehicles ranging from a Dodge Caravan(believe it or not) to a properly set-up Jeep TJ. I can't wait to get out there on my TW and I feel a lot of confidence in my 15/50 tooth sprockets and the stock tire.( I weigh 155 lbs.) I will follow up with some photos soon.
 
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