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Like the article says, reasons "not" to buy it.

I could like a lightweight 400 cc bike, but not a high dollar one, with expensive service and parts.

MSRP of $8k, by the time the dealer gets through, it will be closer to $10k.

Some of the 800cc version at the Daytona dealer:



jb
 

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Yea, I have to agree with the overall premise of the article: If the 400 were a little smaller and about 50 pounds lighter, it might be a contender. For 7 pounds difference, there's absolutely no valid reason to buy it over the 800, IMO. If you're a beginner, you should be getting a different bike altogether, anyway; if you're an experienced rider, there's no reason for the 400. These kinds of projects are a bit stupid, really, lol: manufacturer X produces small displacement motorcycle that no one wants, said small displacement motorcycle doesn't sell well, manufacturer X scraps the project and decides that there's no market for small displacement motorcycles...haha.
 

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Reasons to buy the Ducati Scrambler sixty2:

1. You want to buy a new bike but are scared of large cc numbers
2. You want to buy something new because you think everything used must have problems or why would they be getting rid of it?
3. You have more money than sense
4. You don't know the Duke 390 exists
 

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I'll never be able to buy a Ducati, so personally don't care, I just post this stuff up for you guys that find different bikes interesting. ;)
 

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i like the looks of their big cc scrambler versions but not the colors but the icon does come in red...smaller engine than my bonneville but better "claimed" hp numbers and lower weight...seems like a win to me...that 400cc version is dumb though

Scrambler Ducati - Scramblerducati.com
 

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I'll never be able to buy a Ducati, so personally don't care, I just post this stuff up for you guys that find different bikes interesting. ;)
Keep posting them LT.

After all, this is a motorcycle forum.

Much better than anything in OT.

jb
 

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I like the 800cc version. It's Italian, just like my Moto Guzzi's.
 

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I like the Ducati Scrambler but I'm still amazed by what is considered 'lightweight' nowadays. When I was first looking into a lightweight race bike these were two Italian considerations:


Heritage_Mod_A1962-78_Scrambler_01_prima-versione_634x357_634x357.jpg parilla1.jpg

Almost got the Ducati but ended up with a Yamaha Ascot Scrambler
 

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The bike is really cool, but here is my one reason why I wouldn't buy it. Maintenance.

The sales guy told me (like this was the truth) that they are good for 14,000 miles before they need a valve adjustment. Um sure. Then he told me that you can't work on it anyway, so don't worry because they have this ultrasonic tool thing that tells them when the valves are out of adjust and the belt needs tensioning. Seriously? TW valve adjustment cost $0. TW replacement valves, honing and headwork (by me) $80 or so. Average Honda valve adjustment, a pain in the butt, but just a few shims, $20. I'm guessing a Ducati valve adjustment starts with a $200 ultrasound thingy test, to confirm the sate of the valves and belt, so they can tell me I need a $1000 valve job. ...and who knows what else that Italian prima-donna will require for care. No thanks, I'll pass.


...but the bike does look so totally awesome.
 

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Maybe, but for the other record, the quality of the Scout 60 isn't the point- the point is that it's an insult that it even exists. If it was first, and then they built a bigger and better version, I would be fine with the slower version existing too [it's still more better than an 883], but since there was already a standard one, and then they made a less good version just to be cheaper definitely puts me off on the whole affair.
 

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The bike is really cool, but here is my one reason why I wouldn't buy it. Maintenance.

The sales guy told me (like this was the truth) that they are good for 14,000 miles before they need a valve adjustment. Um sure. Then he told me that you can't work on it anyway, so don't worry because they have this ultrasonic tool thing that tells them when the valves are out of adjust and the belt needs tensioning. Seriously? TW valve adjustment cost $0. TW replacement valves, honing and headwork (by me) $80 or so. Average Honda valve adjustment, a pain in the butt, but just a few shims, $20. I'm guessing a Ducati valve adjustment starts with a $200 ultrasound thingy test, to confirm the sate of the valves and belt, so they can tell me I need a $1000 valve job. ...and who knows what else that Italian prima-donna will require for care. No thanks, I'll pass.


...but the bike does look so totally awesome.
Well your sales guy is shall we say "misinformed.

My Multistrada has similar maint intervals to the scrambler. 7500 mile oil change and 15k valve check/adjustment, belts auto adjust and are good for 5 years. Reality is they really require no more maint than any other bike and in some cases less. My buddy's Concours for instance needs a valve adjustment every 3k vs my 15. Both use the same bucket and shim style adjusters and the work is pretty much the same.

The truth is my Ducati has been extremely reliable and other than normal standard stuff pretty much maint free and has never has anything that has needed to be fixed because it broke. For full disclosure i do have the dealer do the maint on the bike simply out of my own convenience. I need tires pretty much annually(sometimes twice a season but that's the perils of sport bike tires) and i have them do the oil change, they also change the coolant and all the brake/clutch fluid and do a full bolt check on the entire bike and its good to go for a year. Minus the tires it costs me ~250 bucks which is no biggie in my opinion for a year of trouble free riding. My bike has had one valve adjustment which ended up being the mechanic checked with with a feeler, they were well within spec at 15k miles and he did nothing. They charged me a half hour of labor to check it.

This year its due for belts and close to its second valve adjustment so i know that's going to cost me more, it also need tires, its second of front brakes and its first chain and sprockets. That's all normal stuff for any motorcycle and with this one approaching 30k on the clock i would expect it.

As far as DYI labor i know plenty of Ducati riders that do thier own work. They are not that hard to work on.

The bottom line is that my Ducati has been as reliable as any other bike i have ever owned and in some cases more so. Maint while not free its not outrageous and the bike is totally worth it. I have ridden a lot of bikes in my lifetime but never ridden one with as much character and soul as my Ducati has, its one of the reasons i never plan to sell it.
 

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Jb882, you sound like a Moto-Guzzi owner. lol
 

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Beeline, I love the look of those old dirt bikes. Love the old DKW's with their leading link forks. My opinion. Funny, looking at rear fender/tire relationship, not much travel there. lol
 
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