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Hello,

I am kinda new to the forum and I was hoping you guys can help me with this. When I use the electric start the bike turns over but does not start the engine. it does seem like that the crank is moving at the right speed. If I kick start it, it works fine.

any help be great thanks.
 

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Has it been ran in a while? Clutch plates could be sticking...put the bike in 3rd or higher gear and roll the bike back and forth with the clutch disengaged. Make sure the wheel spins and doesn't slide when doing this (it's okay if it slides but means it hasn't broken them loose yet).



Otherwise, you need the battery charged up.



Or, take a look at these steps...http://tw200forum.com/index.php?/topic/880-strange/page__view__findpost__p__6960
 

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Charge your battery or get a new battery.



Mine did the same thing.



It may seem like it is turning plenty fast to start up but it might just be a little slow making starting hard.



There is no need for the battery to fire the spark plug so pulling the volts low using the starter does not effect the spark.



So if it cranks fast enough (electric or foot) it should start.
 

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This is the response lizrdbrth gave me and it made alot of sence.



Your starter isn't spinning fast enough. You're experiencing the downside of CDI ignition.



Fact: You can get more initial crank speed out of a swift kick than you can ever get from a starter, even when working properly.



At its most basic, you could think of the CDI as a "charge/dump" system. It charges a capacitor based on a voltage generated at the flywheel. The faster the crank speed, the greater the initial voltage generated. It sends this voltage to a capacitor. Shortly after this occurs the crank signals this capacitor to "dump" its stored voltage and produce a spark. It then "dumps" this charged capacitor to send high voltage through the coil to the spark plug. If the initial voltage generated is never high enough to fully charge the capacitor you'll get a feeble spark or none at all when it "dumps".



It's a lot like trying to put out a fire with a 2 gallon bucket but only filling it with one cup of water at a time.



If your crank speed is too low the CDI will repeat this charge/dump/charge/dump cycle over and over without ever producing a full spark, even with the button. The TW is a wasted spark system, so it does this twice every cycle, not just on the compression stroke. Kick it, and "Voila!" More crank speed, more initial voltage, good spark.



IF you're absolutely certain your battery is good and has a full charge, all cables and grounds are tight and CLEAN at the connections both from the battery to ground and to the starter, the first place to look is at the solenoid. The TW solenoid BLOWS, the more often you've cranked on it with a low battery the sooner it will blow, and the newer the bike, the worse it blows. And those poor bastits don't have a kicker.



Fortunately the solenoid is easy to test. Get a`pair of old needlenose pliers or a jumper wire of at least 10 gauge. Turn the key "on" with the bike in neutral and jump the solenoid across the large posts with the plier tips or wire. If it starts, your solenoid is arcing and robbing juice from your starter. Replace it.



If this doesn't cure your problem you need to move on to the starter itself. Aside from a failed or weak component within the CDI itself I find most of these issues to be solenoid related, and I never replace one with a Yamaha part. I use the Kawasaki items for the KLR650, EX500 or almost any other motorcycle that has a real solenoid with a higher amperage rating on the contacts.
 

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If you think the starter is spinning it fast enough, check by doing both your hind leg and the starter at the same time. There was a time when mine

started best this way. You will know by the work you have to. With a new CDI, stator, battery, coil, and so on over the last couple of years, I can't kick it as well as start it electrically. --GB
 

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Hey PB, Chances are its not a battery or electrical problem. The TW is a bit sluggish in the starting game. Always try to start the bike when its cold in neutral. If its in 1st gear and just has the clutch disengaged, you will have increase drag and a less probability of starting. One has less drag on the starter than the other. Now when you are down the road and happen to kill it at the stop sign, its likely that the bike will start with the tranny in gear but the clutch disengaged, (but not guaranteed). Its always best when stopped to be in neutral and to avoid that insecurity of whether the bike will start with the clutch disengaged by the bike in gear.

Try it an see if this is not the important aspect of your starting success or not. Tom
 

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No. The entire bike is on one main fuse.



It could however be as simple as a loose or corroded connector, fading battery, solenoid or crappy connections. Time to get greasy.
 

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Nope. "Electrical problems" come in many flavors. The main fuse mostly protects you from dead shorts, such as a bare wire hitting the frame.



You most likely have either a charging/battery issue or something related to the starter circuit.
 

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I opened up my starter motor and found it had some oily sludge in it. I cleaned it out and ordered some new o-rings and brushes. The starter turns a lot faster now and actually starts my bike. I was nervous to open up the starter but it turned out to be pretty easy. The brushes and o-rings are not very expensive either. My old brush was about a quarter the size of the new one.
 

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Excellent point, Rainman.. I haven't yet tried to match our brushes up with non-Yamaha (hardware store) brushes, but most are somewhat standard.



Get after any grease or oil before it soaks your windings.
 
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