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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know there are a lot of different opinions about how to break in a new TW. That is not the subject of this thread. I recently achieved the 600 mile mark recommended by Yamaha. I checked valve clearance and it was right on and changed the oil with Yamalube. There were some fine metal filings on the filter but not as much as I had expected.

My Question:

For those of you who have bought new bikes, did you notice any real difference in the performance or "feel" of the bike after break in? If so, how long did it take?
 

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I did not notice any significant performance changes with my 2003 after following Yamaha's conservative break-in schedule. Did notice an improvement in shifting after changing to a full synthetic oil at around 1,500 miles.
 

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I noticed improved shifting and the suspension loosening up a bit. Still rides like a lumber wagon but ever so slightly better then when new.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I noticed improved shifting and the suspension loosening up a bit. Still rides like a lumber wagon but ever so slightly better then when new.
I have never ridden on a lumber wagon but I have ridden on a few bikes over the years. I think I have noticed an improvement in the suspension as it breaks in but I don't think the suspension on the TW is really that bad for its intended purpose. It helps to make sure the front fork has the proper oil level, but keep in mind, a proper "race ready" suspension would probably cost more than a new TW!
 

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Now (at 5000+ miles) I can shift to 2nd gear immediately after starting off at low rpm on a cold start going down my driveway. Before break in and synthetic oil Dub did not want to go into 2nd gear until warm or higher rpm. Over all shifts are smoother now. The bike feels great to me....It may be because over time the machine becomes an extension of your body - time in the saddle and good maintenance will make your TW "feel" great!
 

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The most noticable thing I have found was the feeling of a bit better power and throttle response after I finally loosened and twisted the carb enough to remove the cheesey air adjustment screw cover. :D

Simply " screw in " a wood or metal screw about 2-3" long ( to allow you to grab it easily) , with a sharp point, just enough to be snug ( don't screw in any more than necessary or until it bottoms out ) into the small hole you will find there "waiting" for it.

Then simply pull the screw and cover out with a pair of pliers or channel locks. Mine came out real easy. This allows you to gain access to the fuel air mixture screw located behind it.

Then re-adjust it by taking it in clockwise until it lightly bottoms out, then simply turn screw out counter clockwise 2 1/4 -2 1/2 " turns " and your there. Now that it's adjusted correctly, the spark plug should " read " correctly ( slightly grey with no carbon build up ) when it's removed.

I found my bike has better power and throttle responsiveness once the mixture was enriched a bit
( as they come "Way Lean" from the factory to meet EPA )

xcalibur
 

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Has anybody heard of bad things happening for not following the break in procedure? I bought a used TW with 200 miles on it and having a hard time keeping the throttle at 1/2 pull.
 

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Has anyone heard of bad things happening for not following the break in procedure? I’m having a hard time not full throttling it.
 

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I don't recall the instructions but I've always considered break-in riding to be not holding the throttle at any one spot for more then a five seconds. The closer you get to the end of break in the higher the rpms and longer you can hold it for. I can only imagine improper break-in leading to badly worn rings and chamber. The end result loss of compression/power.
 

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Don't break it in at low rpm, mid to higher, varying the rpm as much as is practical but no need to get a limp wrist. Low rpm and you glaze the cylinder, rings won't seat properly and things like the wrist pin won't get optimum oil pressure to keep the heat down while break fitting occurs. Same with the cam, higher rpm is better for break in, it keeps the oil pressure up (which equals more oil volume and more cooling at the friction points, low oil pressure at break in equals scored parts and a glazed cylinder that will never break in at its best possible ability without re honing and doing break in over again. There is more than enough scientific documentation that backs this up. Don't ride it like you stole it but do not baby it lugging around at a snails pace either. Ride normally with sanity while trying not to stick at one rpm for miles on miles. Most of all don't worry it's only extremes one way or another that usually causes issues.
 

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Has anyone heard of bad things happening for not following the break in procedure? I’m having a hard time not full throttling it.
It's not whether you full throttle it, it's how LONG you spend at full throttle! At 200 miles, I would not hesitate to use full throttle up through the gears, but I would not go to more than about 70-80% of redline in each gear (that's pretty wound out for most folks), and I would not spend more than maybe 5 minutes at that RPM (roughly 60 mph). After 500 miles I would gradually increase both the % of redline during acceleration and the time spent at that RPM. Finally, at about 1,000 miles I would find a downhill section and tuck in and hold full throttle until it won't go any faster and then close the throttle abruptly several times. This is what I did on my 2010 and at 16,000 miles it used 1/4 qt. in 1,000 miles.
 

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Closing the throttle quick is important, the timing of when and how is just as important,I should have mentioned it, its kind of technical. Do some research... become your own expert. I've posted an article on it in the past from one of the best engine builders out there. He got into the nitty gritty what's and whys etc. generally don't baby it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I have to wonder how relevant articles written about breaking in hand built racing engines are to a mass produced engine like the TW's. I don't think the TW is built to quite the same tolerances as a racing engine and I doubt break in procedure would be the same. I chose to follow the procedure recommended by Yamaha, but here we go again! Everyone has their own opinions but that was not the purpose of my original question. Maybe we should stick to discussing something simple like what is the best oil:)
 

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I have to wonder how relevant articles written about breaking in hand built racing engines are to a mass produced engine like the TW's. I don't think the TW is built to quite the same tolerances as a racing engine and I doubt break in procedure would be the same. I chose to follow the procedure recommended by Yamaha, but here we go again! Everyone has their own opinions but that was not the purpose of my original question. Maybe we should stick to discussing something simple like what is the best oil:)
I was answering Kermits question, sorry for the high jack, never read the OP.

Someone mentioned racing engines? In that case we have all kinds of choices on oil....! YAY what fun ;)
 

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My opinion is that following the Yamaha recommended break-inprocedure was the most boring 500 miles imaginable as a strict adherence to the procedure relegated me to simply cruising local subdivision roads. Even going up my driveway required a violation of the guidelines.
 

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To answer your question, yes, there was a difference. I ran Yamalube as well for the first 1000. For the record fine filings are very normal on the first oil change.

What I noticed mostly was: When letting off the throttle when revving it while stopped the motor did not immediately lose RPM when letting off the throttle after about 200 miles, before that it revved down much quicker. It was clear around 200 miles that the motor was looser. I did have to adjust the valves though. Mine burns almost zero oil and I can only notice the very slightest loss around 1000 miles where it will get changed rain or shine. As for oil... lol.. NOPE not going there :)



I know there are a lot of different opinions about how to break in a new TW. That is not the subject of this thread. I recently achieved the 600 mile mark recommended by Yamaha. I checked valve clearance and it was right on and changed the oil with Yamalube. There were some fine metal filings on the filter but not as much as I had expected.

My Question:

For those of you who have bought new bikes, did you notice any real difference in the performance or "feel" of the bike after break in? If so, how long did it take?
 

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1. I follow factory recommended break-in...but read the wording carefully. See post one of this thread: http://tw200forum.com/forum/general-discussion/33354-114-miles-today-2.html

2. None of my vehicles need oil added between oil/filter changes, but typically the first oil change is earlier than recommended

3. All had good compression readings as long as I owned them

4. When I was young, a friend offered to let me ride a 125cc two stroke with new piston and rings. Don't remember the brand, but it was right shift.
This was back when the California Aqueduct was being routed through Pearblossom and Littlerock, near Palmdale. It was like riding a dirt freeway.
I kept WOT too long and wiped out the rings. We had to change the rings to continue to ride. The first tank or two of fuel is critical.

5. This is the run-in for my 1140 cc Honda:

During the first 500 km (300 miles) of running,
follow these guidelines to ensure your
motorcycle’s future reliability and performance.
● Avoid full-throttle starts and rapid
acceleration.
● Avoid hard braking and rapid down-shifts.
● Ride conservatively.

Yamaha is much more conservative. I did not go past 6,000 RPMs (8,500 redline) on the Honda until after 1,000 miles...and 4,000 to 6,000 was only for short bursts.

6. Backing off the throttle creates a vacuum condition which draws oil past the rings and helps with ring run-in. Do it frequently.
 
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