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I stopped by a local Conoco gas station today I do not normally frequent. While pumping some regular 'ole cheap gas into the Tacoma, I noticed that they have their premium gasoline advertised as ethanol free. I know that the TW is designed to run on 87 octane. So I got to wondering if I should still be running regular gas with ethanol treatment, or switch to my new found and closely located source of ethanol-free 91 octane. Thoughts?
 

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Absolutely.... I don't use ethanol gas unless I am out of town and there is no other choice.....that crap ruined the entire fuel system in my boat and is especially damaging to vehicles that are not used often or are in seasonal storage for months....boats....bikes...snowmobiles....snowblowers.....lawn mowers....collector cars....RVs....

Cost would be insignificant given the mpg that a TW gets......I keep a supply at home to avoid rides to town to fill up.......
 

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Ethanol is the worst thing I've ever seen in fuel systems. It will eat aluminium and rubber. It turns into some sort of jello if left alone for over a month. I used to work on small engines. Mowers, trimmers, etc. Ethanol was the number one problem I saw. In you car, you get less mpg with it. Google it. That is why ethanol-free cost as much or more than premium. The gas companies have it figured out. They know this. They are gonna get the same amount of money per mile from you no matter what fuel you use. So they charge more for the ethanol free. The very one that cost them less to produce. No blending with a food product (corn for the ethanol).
 

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I use E10 in my van and the wife's car. Everything else gets ethanol free. Never fill the TW with E85.

And yes, theoretically there is more energy in ethanol free. But my experience I don't get enough of an increase in MPG to make it worth while to switch the cars to ethanol free fuel.
 

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The money saved in ethanol related repairs easily pays for the little increase in cost of the premium fuel. Not to mention the frustration and inconvenience.

The more non ethanol fuel used sends a message that we don't want the ethanol based crap, IMHO.
 

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Generally I have gained about 10-15% in gas mileage by NOT USING ethanol. Ethanol is all about giving farmers a subsidy in exchange for votes. Ethanol generally gives a loss in performance and power.
ALL POLITICS.
 

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It saves carb diaphragms, anything rubber from turning to crap....stay away from ethanol if you can.
If/when you must use ethanol blends...dose it with either Sea Foam or Sta-Bil.
Always...
 

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I stopped by a local Conoco gas station today I do not normally frequent. While pumping some regular 'ole cheap gas into the Tacoma, I noticed that they have their premium gasoline advertised as ethanol free. I know that the TW is designed to run on 87 octane. So I got to wondering if I should still be running regular gas with ethanol treatment, or switch to my new found and closely located source of ethanol-free 91 octane. Thoughts?
Generally speaking from my experience around here I suspect you are in an area that has either a high population of boating or landscaping activities. We hounded the local fuel suppliers to provide Non E gas here because those who know small engines and lightly used equipment or marine engines prefer to steer clear of ethanol all together. I don't believe it makes a lick of difference in a daily use vehicle that gets fresh fuel regularly but in small engines around water or left idle for longer periods it sure does save a lot of expense with fuel system rebuilds and clean outs. It is your choice but be glad you have that choice. Do not expect to get any great power increase or even better fuel economy by using the higher octane fuel. All you will honestly get from Non E is peace of mind if it takes a month or two or more to use the fuel in the tank. Ethanol degrades much faster than non e and it is pretty rough on rubber and aluminum and many types of plastics and fiberglass. Proof positive for me was a boat I owned that had a built in fuel tank made of fiberglass which was between the molded fiberglass hull and deck. The ethanol ate the tank and began leaking into the hull's fiberglass and started eating the seam at the transom. I had to use a sawzall to cut the deck to get to the tank for removal and replace it with a SS tank plus I had to completely sand out the seam and re-fiberglass the hull to transom connection. Newer vehicles and boats are made to be Ethanol compliant while most older ones never knew just how degrading alcohol was going to be. When replacing the fuel lines make absolutely sure the new lines state they are E fuel compliant. On our TWs we have rubber boot joints on both sides of the carb. These are absolutely NOT E fuel compliant and you will soon notice they become hardened and shrink causing air leaks and the dreaded performance issues because they no longer form an air tight seal.

GaryL
 
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