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Got a bunch of old corral to rebuild...use the old set and tamp method, sacrete, or another method.... steel would be nice but I am afraid it would be cost prohibitive...

I have built plenty of fence in my life...just looking for any ideas and knowledge....

Dry climate... average 9 in of precipitation a year...

GO....
 

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Got a bunch of old corral to rebuild...use the old set and tamp method, sacrete, or another method.... steel would be nice but I am afraid it would be cost prohibitive...

I have built plenty of fence in my life...just looking for any ideas and knowledge....

Dry climate... average 9 in of precipitation a year...

GO....
I wish I could help, best thing we could all do is get a list of methods ready. TRUMP will need it as well.. ;)
 

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First you call Julie.

Next you pray.

Then you dig.

Seriously I would drive steel into the ground. The round hole, Sacrete and wood post method is fine but in Illinois wood rots. Where you are with that low of moisture wood will be there until Jesus comes back. So, wood is most likely good but a lot of work.
I say steel and drive them in.
 

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Here in NE wood rots like crazy. I live in a pretty moist area and i also happen to have a lot of wooden fence posts in my yard. All of mine are pressure treated, they are also coated on the below grade part with foundation tar and also set in concrete. A lot of those posts are 20+ years old and still good.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Are we talking barbed wire or a stockade fence? If it's wire then locust post are the way to go as they won't rot. Get a powered post hole digger or even better on on the P.T.O. of a tractor and a fencing you will go.
Would be post and pole or rough cut 2×12....working corrals for cattle... auger is a given since I have one...barbed won't work in working alleyways or headed up to the squeeze chute...
 

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Check with the metal scrap yards. I just made a call to one here in NJ, lots of fencing gets turned in for scrap this time of year (homeowners putting in new fence) they sell bundles of used steel fence post used by the metric ton. It's galvanized! I'm not sure that it's strong enough for cattle though..?



Got a bunch of old corral to rebuild...use the old set and tamp method, sacrete, or another method.... steel would be nice but I am afraid it would be cost prohibitive...

I have built plenty of fence in my life...just looking for any ideas and knowledge....

Dry climate... average 9 in of precipitation a year...

GO....
 

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I did a fence about 25 years ago, and others more recent. I dug the holes added some 3/4 rock in the bottom <> 1-2 inches for drain. Then I got the posts and 4 in PVC pipe.. Cut the PVC about 18 inches long, long enough to protrude out of the hole about 1 inch... Used a belt sander to shape the end of the post into the 4 in PVC... Put the post and PVC in the ground and then the sackcrete..... The fence is still there! If the post gets a bit wobbly you just drive a tapered shim down along the side of the post. The nice thing about this is on one project I needed to be able to open the fence up to get into the back yard with my truck if needed... So I made the fence sections so they fit and 2 8ft sections was removable with the removal of 16 or so deck screws, lift the sections out and remove the center post.... If the post was to rot it would be easy to dig it out using a long wood drill or sawalll with a long blade to cut the broke of section of post.

Kinda like this but I used round PVC then shaped the post to fit.

header_img.jpg




Jim
 

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Build the new fence with cutting lasers spaced about 3/4 of an inch apart. If a cow happens to wander through the fence now, it is 3/4 inch steaks ready to BBQ. :p
3/4 inch? You ARE on a diet! Nothing thinner than 1 1/4" touches my grill.


Tom
 

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>I dug the holes added some 3/4 rock in the bottom <> 1-2 inches for drain. <


I was going to suggest the same thing. Wood posts will last a long time if you put gravel in the bottom of the hole and then sink the post into the gravel before adding the concrete. Moisture WILL get in between the post and the concrete, but if the moisture has someplace to drain, the wood won't rot. I tore out an old fence one time and noticed that the posts that didn't have concrete in the bottom of the hole were the only ones that didn't rot.
 

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I also like to make a little marinade with soy sauce, dijon mustard, salt, pepper, a hint of garlic powder, and just a splash of Maker's Mark. Wait what are we supposed to be talking about? OH Yeah! sink them in 3/4 minus using pressure treated lumber. Tommy why did you bring up food?
 

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I also like to make a little marinade with soy sauce, dijon mustard, salt, pepper, a hint of garlic powder, and just a splash of Maker's Mark. Wait what are we supposed to be talking about? OH Yeah! sink them in 3/4 minus using pressure treated lumber. Tommy why did you bring up food?
Stop Stop Now I'm hungry again... :p :D
 

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3/4 inch? You ARE on a diet! Nothing thinner than 1 1/4" touches my grill.


Tom
Same here. I get mine cut for me 1 1/2" is what i ask for.

The Local BJ's store by me has very good meat and i buy the bulk cuts of beef and have them cut it into steaks for me. ~$2 a pound cheaper then they normal steaks and i get exactly what i want. If i want a really top end steak i go to my local butcher but that costs a lot more $$$, he also cuts me exactly what i want.

For me all a good steak needs is salt, pepper and fire, a wood fire at that. I refuse to use gas grills and only cook over hardwood lump charcoal or real wood.
 

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3/4" is perfect for grilling at high heat you sear the outside but leave the center beautifully red (for me the Missus prefers pink.) This is done at a high heat for a short period so as to sear the meat but not over cook it.
You can do any thickness if you sear over high heat and finish the cook over indirect heat. I do it all the time. I set up my weber kettle grill with coals on only one side and leave the other side with no fire underneath every time i use it, that way i have two heat zones. one for searing one for cooking.

Kind of like this
weber_forsteaks2.jpg

I leave the lid off and get the fire red hot, sear both sides then move it to the part of the grill with no coals and finish the cook to the desired doneness ~ 3 to 5 min a side or so with the lid on depending on what temp im looking for. Rare for me Med rare for her.
 

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Not sure what the previous owner used on our Back Yard Fence, as far as setting posts...but the fence is over 25 years old and the posts will outlive the fence itself....:cool:

If I ever decide to put up a newer fence, I'm keeping the posts as is...Solid as they get and made out of wood:

Fence Posts 001.JPG Fence Posts 002.JPG
 
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