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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone had any experience using the faast flex handlebars on their TW or other bikes? My friend is recommending them to me but haven’t heard from the horses mouth yet about them.

Opinions? Criticisms? Best bars in the world?
 

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I ran them on my 2012 XT1200Z Super Tenere till I sold it. pulled the bars and sold them to another Super Tenere owner. I liked them.... took away a fair amount of shock to the hands and arms, also diminished vibration at the grips. They are pricy and well made.
 

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I've heard of these for a long time but never rode with them.
They look like they would be great for stutter-bumps & whoops and rough ground in general.

But...I believe they would really be overwhelmed by the T-Dub's lousy suspension!
For $360, they are something I might consider only after I significantly improved the suspension.

For a little more moola you could get the tunable ProCycle fork kit and much better shock spring.
I have those on my T-Dub and previous bikes. They work!
ProCycle is a good vendor for T-Dub kit.

Also, tapered aluminum bars will help with vibes and harsh handlebar action.

https://www.fasstco.com/

https://procycle.us/bikepages/tw200.html#fork-kit
 

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I want to try them just have not been able to drop the coin on them yet

I bet they are killer from everything I have seen and heard

many choices on angles etc I wish I could go somewhere and try all the different configurations to see what I like best
 

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Check out handlebar riser dampener systems also. Because the TW used the round style riser clamps instead of traditional dirt bike risers, choices are limited. The flex bars and Twisted Engineering Bars seem to work. People love them, or don't find they do anything for them.

Rox Speed FX Elite Series Anti-Vibration Handlebar Riser are one that should fit TW. They aren't cheap.
 

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I seriously question whether those bars are great, or if it's just a case of confirmation bias on the part of reviews. They appear to only dampen in one axis, and while that axis is relevant for up and down bumps if you align them straight up and down, there's a lot of other vibration on bikes that aren't along that singular axis. There's also harmonics to consider, but I guess the adjustable aspect can help there. At that price, I'm probably not going to find out.
 

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Darth hit the nail on the head. If your going to spend a lot of money - spend it wisely!
1. Suspension
2. Brakes
3. Tires
4. Everything else
 

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I seriously question whether those bars are great, or if it's just a case of confirmation bias on the part of reviews. They appear to only dampen in one axis, and while that axis is relevant for up and down bumps if you align them straight up and down, there's a lot of other vibration on bikes that aren't along that singular axis. There's also harmonics to consider, but I guess the adjustable aspect can help there. At that price, I'm probably not going to find out.

You really don't know how great they are until you take them off. That's well known by those who have had them and ride hard. For lolly gaggers, not so much. Ride a 60/80 mile Enduro or cross country race a few times then take them away and most want them back asap. You want them lined up on the same plane as your forks. Come off a double bad and these will save your wrists for sure. They'd be a waste of money for most tw riders. I just ordered my third set "Enduro Low" to put on top of my BRP Scotts Sub-mount to keep the same geometry as I had before. It sucks they cost so much but they are very well made and do work if sized and installed properly. They are not really for vibrations as much as they are for sharp impacts and hard hits. They defiantly allow me to ride at least 30% longer at a bearable fatigue. Just last week a rider dropped out early from arm pump and wrists so tight it looked like the tendons were gonna snap. That's what these are for; avoiding that.
 

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You really don't know how great they are until you take them off. That's well known by those who have had them and ride hard. For lolly gaggers, not so much. Ride a 60/80 mile Enduro or cross country race a few times then take them away and most want them back asap. You want them lined up on the same plane as your forks. Come off a double bad and these will save your wrists for sure. They'd be a waste of money for most tw riders. I just ordered my third set "Enduro Low" to put on top of my BRP Scotts Sub-mount to keep the same geometry as I had before. It sucks they cost so much but they are very well made and do work if sized and installed properly. They are not really for vibrations as much as they are for sharp impacts and hard hits. They defiantly allow me to ride at least 30% longer at a bearable fatigue. Just last week a rider dropped out early from arm pump and wrists so tight it looked like the tendons were gonna snap. That's what these are for; avoiding that.

excellence description of what these bars do JJ. they also reduce fatigue on rough dirt/gravel roads like the Dempster highway or the canol road, both of these are long tough tours..... good equipment helps everyone.
 

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Ride a 60/80 mile Enduro or cross country race a few times
Yeah, I could see it in those conditions. With the TW being my primary ride for the last year and 4k miles, most of my vibration woes are less in the hardcore whoops department and more on the spent too much time in the vibrating massage chair side of things.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I've heard of these for a long time but never rode with them.
They look like they would be great for stutter-bumps & whoops and rough ground in general.

But...I believe they would really be overwhelmed by the T-Dub's lousy suspension!
For $360, they are something I might consider only after I significantly improved the suspension.

For a little more moola you could get the tunable ProCycle fork kit and much better shock spring.
I have those on my T-Dub and previous bikes. They work!
ProCycle is a good vendor for T-Dub kit.

Also, tapered aluminum bars will help with vibes and harsh handlebar action.

https://www.fasstco.com/

https://procycle.us/bikepages/tw200.html#fork-kit
Definitely good points, I’ve been posting around including the best upgrades to improve safety and ride ability of a new TW, so I have the procycle front fork kit with emulators, installing it this week. The bars were a recommendation from a friend with many years of experience in pro off road sports to just help reduce fatigue, which was something reported in reviews from a lot of buyers. But I wanted to see if anyone had run them with noticeable difference in off road conditions, as big a rider as I am, I’m looking into all options to make it a safer and more stable platform to ride.

Front fork upgrade is current task (parts in hand), next will be handlebars, even if they aren’t the fasst brand, got some great ideas here. Talked with Worx, gotta check back in about 5 months before they have all the templates and parts made to start making custom tw200 shocks again, that’ll be the last thing suspension-wise.

These are all great ideas, and might look into the riser dampeners, or some of the other options mentioned here, appreciate everyone’s input!
 

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I have a set of the Rox anti-vibration bar risers on my Beta enduro and definitely like them. Pricey, but it feels like an immediate suspension upgrade. I've only sampled the Flexx bars on an ATV, and again, felt like an immediate suspension overhaul. They definitely make a difference and are high quality, but even still the asking price to me seems awfully steep.

For the TW I don't know that I'd bother. The Beta I've done some long and fairly challenging turkey runs and enduros with. The TW goes trail plonking and generally buzzing around town. The Rox risers I used for the TW are the standard 7/8 to 1 1/8 adapter risers, not the rubber mounted ones. I didn't see a need for them, or spending the extra coin.

Unfortunately there's not much you can do about engine vibration. They're called "thumpers" for a reason. KTM's managed to make them pretty smooth with a trick dual-counterbalancer setup with one in the crankcase and replacing one of the overhead cams with another smaller balancer. I've heard of filling the handlebar with sanded caulk (heavy), I tried this one one bike and it did make a slight improvement, you can get weighted bar ends (again, slight improvement), various rubber risers, but nothing is suddenly going to erase the engine buzz short of selling it and getting a Goldwing.
 

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Check out handlebar riser dampener systems also. Because the TW used the round style riser clamps instead of traditional dirt bike risers, choices are limited. The flex bars and Twisted Engineering Bars seem to work. People love them, or don't find they do anything for them.

Rox Speed FX Elite Series Anti-Vibration Handlebar Riser are one that should fit TW. They aren't cheap.
I saw a set of those Twisted Engineering bars break badly at the track Saturday
No way would I run those things even if I were paid
The Fasst Flexx Bars work great. Strong as can be. The downside is they are expensive (like the Twisted Engineering Bars) and kinda heavy.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Reporting back after a couple months of use now...


Compared to the stock, these bars are so awesome, they take a good bit of vibe out compared to the stock, recently learned to go with a softer elastomer on them and it makes it even sweeter, you get used to the small amount of flex when you put pressure on the bars downhill or when you’re taking front tire impacts.

Just minimizing the bike vibrations a little is so much better compared to taking the bike to work on the stock bars (riding about 1.5 hrs each way... I take the scenic route, normal car commute is like 30ish minutes).

Wonder what vibrations would be like with bar riser dampeners, the fast bars, and the dampening grips... I should try and report back.

They are pretty much indestructible, one of the nicest things I’ve ever bought for myself, they are built rock solid, they also look awesome.

Aside from the price tag that makes you gasp a little bit from both ends, these bars get two thumbs up.
 

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Looked them up on the web. Back in the 80s I had a flex-stem on my mountain bike. Same theory, different plane. This was before shock absorbing forks came out.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Looked them up on the web. Back in the 80s I had a flex-stem on my mountain bike. Same theory, different plane. This was before shock absorbing forks came out.
I remember seeing the forks with shocks on them for the first time thinking they were a gimmick like “pumps” on shoes. But after seeing guys do those crazy mountain downhill races. It’s such a cool mod to me now.
 
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