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Cheap-o bicycle tube repair patch kits from your local box store seem to do the trick for the stupid stuff I have done (drive over nails, thorns, pinch the tube and put a snake bite pair of holes in it with my tire iron...)



They work great for me. I've never had a patched tube fail. And yes, it's possible to break the bead on a 14" rear wheel with three tire irons. That said, if your bike is old like mine, break the bead at home before you leave to make sure it's not rust welded to the rim.



I've had to cut Vespa tires off of the rims with an air chisel because they became one and the same due to age and moisture.
 

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I got a new rear tire for fathers day, so I'll let you know on the whole rear tire changing thing in a day or two.







If I were planning a long ride I would:



1. Use ride-on like your planning

2. Carry a spare tube (front & rear). If you get the bead on the tire broke, it's easier to just replace the tube than try to patch it.

3. Carry a good patch kit (not bicycle). What if...you have more than 1 flat? Hard for me to abandon a good patch kit too!

4. Though I think the "Crutch" type jack is an excellent idea. Without said jack, I have had to lean my TW against a fence once while doing a field tire repair. There are many improvised jack items along the way (tree branch for example) which may work, but if you got the room, a jack would work.
 

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I've heard of that being done on a TW wheel, but I think it used up to much of the drop down space needed to remove a tire from the wheel. It might work well, but I'd check it out close before I did it.
 

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Also, of all the tires available for the rear of the TW are any of them tubless tires or are they all designed for a tube?
 

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All are tube type.



Except for some Beemers and a smattering of other bikes anything with spokes is gunna need a tube.
 

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I would carry a spare tube & patch kit. I have crummy luck & like to have a back up option:).
 

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I'm planning a rather lengthy (800 mi) trip

My plan is to put 12oz of Ride-On sealant in my rear tire as a prophylactic measure. How common are rear flats for those of you riding off-road?




I've had my TW for 5,000 miles, never had a flat. I like to go up to old mining sites, which usually have lots of nails. I put Ride-On in both tires last Fall, so far so good. It's not supposed to be as good in tubes, but I think it will work OK unless you slice the tire or tube. Definitely put it in both tires...12oz rear, 9 front.



Oddly enough, in 40 years of riding, I've never had a flat! I think that thoughtful slow riding and paying a lot of attention to debris in your wheel track will improve your odds significantly.
 

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From what I've heard Ride-On is great stuff, wise choice there.



I've put over 4,000 miles on my TW since getting it, most of it in the dirt - no flats. But, I also believe in Murphy's law. So, i carry a front tube that I believe in a pinch could be used in the rear. I also carry a patch kit with automotive patches, tire irons, valve core remover, and a small Slime compressor with extra cooling holes in the compressor housing.



If you don't have much experience changing tires or patching tubes get some practice before you go. As pointed out this would also help to make sure the bead isn't stuck on the rim if you do get a flat.



Tire shops are going to be few and far between on the UTBDR so go prepared, just my 2 cents.



That looks to be a great ride that I need to do someday. I wish you the best, have a great time!
 

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As luck would have it I had a flat on the rear today, a piece of old rusty fence wire got me. I got to use my trail jack plus the rest of my flat fixin's. I pushed it up under a good shade tree and went to work, 45 minutes or so later I rode away. It's not fun, but if you are prepared it's not terrible either.
 

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haven't had to patch a TW tube yet but i've patched many a bicycle tire...def not the same but here is one last resort fix that i have used to ride/limp a bicycle out of the woods...not sure that this would work on a TW though...if the hole in the tube is too big to patch and you don't have another tube cut the tube in half and tie a knot in both ends and reinflate...it will crate a flat spot but it might let you crawl out of the woods if you have no other options
 

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I doubt that a guy could tie knots in a tw rear tube. I havent tried it

Though. I carry a spare tube, bicycle patch's and 3 tire irons if going on a long trip. I havent had a flat yet but ive changed tires on both tw's before and the hardest part

On the rear is breaking the bead. If your riding with a buddy then his kickstand will make a decent bead breaker. Ive never used the bicycle patches but alot of guys on advrider do and they have good luck with them.
 

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There is nothing wrong with bike patches, but that does not include the glueless (gutless) simpleton patches. They even leak for bicycles if not super fresh and not replaced relatively soon. It would take a big gash to overcome the RideOn protection, and or a shot of slime and some air from a compressor. I've said it before and others have occasionally agreed 1. a bottle of slime, and 2. an on board pump or air compressor should get you out of the woods and to a PU. Then change that tube in the convenience of your garage or your local MC shop. Limping is better than walking and suffering a bit is better than suffering a lot because you stayed at home due to the amount of stuff that you thought you would have to take to be safe. In other words, I'd take a few risks on not having the ability to change a tube, but have some sort of contingency to limp out if I have a tire down. Usually it will be a nail, screw, piece of wire and not a 6" gash. Lets hope the 6" gash occurs within sight of the truck or a busy road. Cheers, and ride one safely. Tom
 

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Yeah, the CHEAP bike patch kit that comes with rubber cement and the little cheese grater 'rougher upper' for $1.96 at Wal*mart has fixed many a tube for me. I don't trust the modern 'sticker' type ones.



I've had good luck with my bikes and me owning them, but I've fixed a lot of tubes on old bikes that we purchase and/or get running for friends.



Speaking of which, does anyone make a higher quality tube than Kenda any more? It seems like the old Bridgestone tubes from Hondas of the 60s and 70s are SO MUCH nicer than anything new from India, Taiwan, or China. But I don't know if you can still buy something of that quality or better anymore?



I was reading some threads on ADVrider about gluing over your spoke receivers and going tubeless. To me that makes sense MAYBE if you're using a tubeless tire, but I bet the Trailwing tires on the TW would leak air at the bead really bad. Am I correct?
 

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I've installed a new tube twice in the field. Go to a bicycle shop and get the CO2 device they use to blow up tires. I bring along 5 or 6 CO2 cartridges to air up the new tube.







 

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It looks like you hit a landmine..



Wish we had a center stand in addition to the kickstand sometimes



On my long trips I take tubes along just in case.



But if it's getting late or I'm in bad weather I won't hesitate to call my wife or friends with one of these..





My spot will send either

#1 I'm currently doing great

#2 I'm having difficulties and I'm attempting to fix

#3 Bring The Trailer & come get me because I can't continue (Non Emergency)

#4 SOS My life is in danger





 
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