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Discussion Starter #1
First oil change coming up at 100 miles.

1 Is the O rings replacement really necessary? I'm asking becaus4 one set of 4 at Procycle seems pretty expensive, but if it needs to be done...

2 Is anyone using the oil filters from Procycle (pack of five for $34)? I'm assuming they are not reusable.
Thank you for your help.
 

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First oil change coming up at 100 miles.

1 Is the O rings replacement really necessary? I'm asking becaus4 one set of 4 at Procycle seems pretty expensive, but if it needs to be done...

2 Is anyone using the oil filters from Procycle (pack of five for $34)? I'm assuming they are not reusable.
Thank you for your help.
Hello and welcome. You don't need to change the orings each time. With a little care they'll last you multiple changes. Do not WD40 the orings though. You'll ruin them.

The factory filter is reusable, just clean it off and reuse. It should be a fine metal mesh filter. Otherwise the paper media filters should be changed as needed.

I change my oil every 1,000 miles and change the filter every 2,000. I call it cheap insurance!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hello and welcome. You don't need to change the orings each time. With a little care they'll last you multiple changes. Do not WD40 the orings though. You'll ruin them.

The factory filter is reusable, just clean it off and reuse. It should be a fine metal mesh filter. Otherwise the paper media filters should be changed as needed.

I change my oil every 1,000 miles and change the filter every 2,000. I call it cheap insurance!
Thank you, I appreciate.
 

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Make sure any replacement filter has the same four holes as the stock one. Some have been mislabeled before and destroyed engines. Also getting the plug off without stripping it takes some finesse and the right kinda leverage usually. I find pecking at the socket (6pt socket is preferable to 12pt) with a hammer before turning and using a 3/4" breaker bar that's probably 2' long has been the cleanest way so far for me. A shorter bar would probably be doable but the way they pivot is useful here. Using some anti-seize afterwards may be some good insurance as well, but try not to get it in the engine. It's just the large "cap" or lip of the plug where it pushes against the engine, seems to be the heat letting the dissimilar metals kinda adhere to each other. Happens with engine bolts like that sometimes.

On older TW's, the engine case covers were fastened with Phillips heads that liked to strip rather than turn due to seizure. Had a bear of a time doing a sprocket change on one like that. An impact driver removed one or two but the rest had to be Dremeled down, each one starting to turn after finally getting hot enough. Running the engine until it's warmed up would probably lend a little help to getting the plug to move freely, and hot oil drains out easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Make sure any replacement filter has the same four holes as the stock one. Some have been mislabeled before and destroyed engines. Also getting the plug off without stripping it takes some finesse and the right kinda leverage usually. I find pecking at the socket (6pt socket is preferable to 12pt) with a hammer before turning and using a 3/4" breaker bar that's probably 2' long has been the cleanest way so far for me. A shorter bar would probably be doable but the way they pivot is useful here. Using some anti-seize afterwards may be some good insurance as well, but try not to get it in the engine. It's just the large "cap" or lip of the plug where it pushes against the engine, seems to be the heat letting the dissimilar metals kinda adhere to each other. Happens with engine bolts like that sometimes.

On older TW's, the engine case covers were fastened with Phillips heads that liked to strip rather than turn due to seizure. Had a bear of a time doing a sprocket change on one like that. An impact driver removed one or two but the rest had to be Dremeled down, each one starting to turn after finally getting hot enough. Running the engine until it's warmed up would probably lend a little help to getting the plug to move freely, and hot oil drains out easier.
Yes, just ordered the correct filter from Amazon along with a gallon of Yamalube 10-40. I have a breaker bar which pivots and a Toyota 6 side socket from my old 1973 FJ40, I miss that tank. I will warm up the engine of course. I will remove the gear shift just to make sure I have plenty of room to seat the socket correctly. Thank you for all the suggestions.
 

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It doesn't matter who you ordered the filter from, Amazon, Babbitts, Yamaha itself. Check that those 4 holes are there.
It's about the wrong product sometimes being found in the right box. This is documented and catastrophic.
No one at Amazon is going to know the difference. Neither is the kid at the counter at the Yammy dealer.

I've had my TW for a bit more than 2 years now. Came with the factory metal-mesh filter. I've sprayed it out with contact cleaner and used it again and again.
Like the other guys I pin it at 1000 miles but if I'm doing really tough riding with her it'll be sooner.
Fully reusable/not a throwaway filter.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It doesn't matter who you ordered the filter from, Amazon, Babbitts, Yamaha itself. Check that those 4 holes are there.
It's about the wrong product sometimes being found in the right box. This is documented and catastrophic.
No one at Amazon is going to know the difference. Neither is the kid at the counter at the Yammy dealer.

I've had my TW for a bit more than 2 years now. Came with the factory metal-mesh filter. I've sprayed it out with contact cleaner and used it again and again.
Like the other guys I pin it at 1000 miles but if I'm doing really tough riding with her it'll be sooner.
Fully reusable/not a throwaway filter.
Yes, it is the filter with four holes, I bought it as a back up. Thank you
 

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It doesn't matter who you ordered the filter from, Amazon, Babbitts, Yamaha itself. Check that those 4 holes are there.
It's about the wrong product sometimes being found in the right box. This is documented and catastrophic.
No one at Amazon is going to know the difference. Neither is the kid at the counter at the Yammy dealer.

I've had my TW for a bit more than 2 years now. Came with the factory metal-mesh filter. I've sprayed it out with contact cleaner and used it again and again.
Like the other guys I pin it at 1000 miles but if I'm doing really tough riding with her it'll be sooner.
Fully reusable/not a throwaway filter.
Thought I'd highlight this a bit so others who wander into this thread and post might pick up on it. :p
 

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If you use 29 ft./lbs. instead of 31 as the torque for the drain bolt you'll never have a problem removing it at the next oil change. I usually use 1,000 to 1,500 miles as a change interval, and if I've been running it hard and hot in the summer or the desert I'll check and clean the oil filter at 500 miles.....probably not necessary but I usually find soft carbon on it and it gives me an idea of whether to change oil at 1,000 or 1,500.

This was at 30 miles:
tw200_30 mile change002.JPG

this was at 3,000 miles just after coming back from Death Valley:

TW200 oil filter at 3000 001.JPG

No metal, just carbon.

I used that same OEM filter from new in 2010 to 16,000 miles in 2017.....probably would last 20 years and 30,000 miles. :p


Change again at 500 miles then at 1,000....metal should be minimal by then. Hopefully you have read the thread about using 15% less torque than spec on the filter housing bolts.

I re-used the filter cap O-ring for at least 10,000 miles and replaced the little one at the Allen bolt about 6,000....it got torn somehow but the replacement still looked fine 10,000 miles later.
 

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As jtstdub says. Open oil bleed screw on the head to check for oil flow to the valves. Some don’t do it but is is recommended in the manual. Don’t over tighten this bolt as it will break. Some have forgotten to tighten it and lost oil and ruined the engine.
 

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A complete oil change primer thread would be good for the stickies. This one is turning into that..
 
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On older TW's, the engine case covers were fastened with Phillips heads that liked to strip rather than turn due to seizure. Had a bear of a time doing a sprocket change on one like that. An impact driver removed one or two but the rest had to be Dremeled down, each one starting to turn after finally getting hot enough. Running the engine until it's warmed up would probably lend a little help to getting the plug to move freely, and hot oil drains out easier.
Those case cover screws are not really "Phillips"...they are JIS, a different and far better design (Japanese Industrial Standard). Your tool kit should have one. Or you can order better quality ones for minimal $.
Don't even *think about" turning that little carb drain screw with a Phillips! You would probably ruin it...I did.
Search this site for "JIS screws" for sources of good JIS screwdrivers.

"...and hot oil drains out easier..." True dat! And much more completely, too.

Have fun!
 

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I am new too the tw200. I bought a 2019 and just put 200 miles on it. I changed the oil and big filter. My question is that the big filter had a fair amount of metal stuff on it. It looked liked the filter in the oil change thread. Is this normal? Also I bought a Yamaha filter that looks some what the same. The metal screen is wavy not flat. The part number is 5HO-13440-09 It did not have the 00 on the end.
 

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At 200 miles this amount of metal is entirely normal:

TWOilChange013.jpg

It should diminish to nearly nothing at 1,000 to 1,500 miles. You can clean and re-use the flat screen filter for literally tens of thousands of miles.. It does make analysis of metal or other stuff easier than the pleated kind. This way, you will never have the dreaded wrong filter in the right box syndrome. As long as your pleated filter has four holes it's OK. I still have the one I bought in 2010 as a backup just in case my OEM gets torn or the rubber gets brittle. This did not happen in 16,000 miles, so I figure the new one in the 2018 will last 25,000 to 30,000 miles!
 
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