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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I done the first oil change with 78 miles on it. I was not scared of the metal pieces in the screens because I read all the other post to see what to expect. I went with Mobil 1 4tr. I plan on doing it again at 150 miles and again at 200 miles then I will go the full 600 mile routine after that. Is it a good idea to keep the screens in to a certain mileage then go to the standard filter? I almost have everything done on this and when my boxes show up and I get them mounted, I will share some porn. Thank to you all for all the info you gave out to help me along!
 

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Still have original screen filter at 3500 miles,
I think a lot of folks here keep them for "Ever"
Be careful of replacement filters as they can be wrong and cause engine failure,
Plenty to read here about the "Wrong filter"
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I already read those post and I thank you. I have the right filter with the 4 holes. I guess I won't need it if you still have the screen in for that long. Thanks for the reply.
 

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Fist oil change in the record book!

Good decision changing the oil at 78 miles. I changed mine at 100, 200, 300 and 500. I saw metal in all the oil changes until 500 which came out pretty clean. I also switched to Amsoil 10w- 50 on my first oil change and am very glad I did. I bought Yamaha pleated oil filter and run those instead of the stock screen. Personal choice, I'm sure either is fine. I just don't feel like cleaning the screen. I eventually switched to 10w-40 amsoil, the tw seems to like 40 better than 50. Just remember the tw doesn't hold much more than a quart of oil so change it often even you skip the filter part of it.


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Personally I think that is overkill on the oil changes. I ride mostly on the street so that does make a difference. My first was 500 miles, then 1000, then every 3000 miles. I am about to hit 43000 miles on mine soon. I do not ride it easy. Hard starts with fast take offs and engine rapped out. I'll run it full throttle at times. I have always ridden it that way. To each his own but that many oil changes should really make it last.
IMG_20170510_2120324_rewind.jpg
 

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Having just taken delivery of a 2017, what exactly is the rationale for such an early oil change?

I would not mind doing it, but over a lifetime of owning motor vehicles of all types, I've found that sticking pretty closely to the manufacturer's recommendations has held me in good stead.

Or, to put it another way, is there a history of lubrication-related failures on TW200's where owners just followed the book recommendations?

If not, I agree with Ken about "overkill" - modern oils should not break down after 78 miles!
 

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As long as you can get the original filter screen clean and with no damage just keep cleaning and using it. Change intervals are purely a personal choice after the first couple dumps where you see the metal filings being dispelled. Those who do a lot of slow poke riding in a hot and dusty area should change more often than a road warrior and the color of the oil tells you more than the miles on it. This is an Air Cooled motor so the cooler it runs the longer the oil will last.

GaryL
 

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Having just taken delivery of a 2017, what exactly is the rationale for such an early oil change?

I would not mind doing it, but over a lifetime of owning motor vehicles of all types, I've found that sticking pretty closely to the manufacturer's recommendations has held me in good stead.

Or, to put it another way, is there a history of lubrication-related failures on TW200's where owners just followed the book recommendations?

If not, I agree with Ken about "overkill" - modern oils should not break down after 78 miles!
Well, the humble TW has a habit of “barfing up” (as one of us put it) fine particles for the first 500 miles or so – some of those particles get caught by the filter, but some of the finer bits of alloy kinda turn into “liquid soup”

Just how harmful this “soup” is, is debatable, as it’s the soft stuff, and unlikely to do any damage, but as Xracer points out, even cleaning the filter can improve flow

In older engines, (classic cars etc), it’s sometimes unwise to use flushing oil, as the sediment will have found somewhere to settle, and disturbing it from its resting place can result in a noisier engine (or worse)

Now – you “know” your 2017 is going to be prone to this “fine metal sludge” for the first 500 miles, and as it only takes a quart of oil, it would make sense to catch it before it settles. What happens after that is negligible, as the amount of sludge decreases dramatically

Perhaps “over-kill”, perhaps “good practice” – your bike, your choice ……

(And no – there are no recorded instances of engine failure by either changing this regularly or not)
 

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I can run it with clean, fresh oil for double the amount of time for an extra $8 per 3100 miles.
When I think about all the foolish ways I've spent WAY more than $8, spending that much to have the best oil possible in my engine seems like a no-brainer to me. But again....that's just me. My engine might not last as long as someone who runs their oil twice as long as I do. When I consider that I used to spent at least $8 a day on a pack of smokes, spending that much twice a year on my TW doesn't seem that outrageous.
 

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Once those metal fragments get trapped by the filter screens they aren’t going anywhere and rarely if ever occlude more than a percent or so of the two screens’s filtering surface areas. It is the finer particles that pass through the screens’s pores that one is also eliminating by frequent oil changes. The coarser bits barfed up on the screens could likely stay there for the life of the engine and not contribute to any additional engine wear.
In the long run frequent disassembly will see increased wear on the drain plug, the two O-rings, and the oil filter cover bolts and bolt holes. So it helps to use the correct tools and technique from the beginning. I’ve seen more than a few abused drain plugs and heard stories of sheared cover bolts so certainly zealous maintenance can have it’s own negative unanticipated consequences.
So do it, but do it carefully.:)
 

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During the first 500 miles, so called break in period which I disagree with, it is beneficial to change the oil early and a couple times as the engine and various other parts and gears shed manufacturing debris. After around 500 miles it is pretty much a matter of the type of use you give the engine. The oil picks up un burnt particles and will become contaminated quicker in a hot and dusty environment or when running the engine hard but at slow speeds where it does not get the cooling from going faster. I think after the first 2-3 changes where you get the vast majority of metal filings out a good plan is at 500 mile intervals but that is only what I think. Oil is cheap and engines are expensive. You also have to understand that some if not most of us here are always looking for a good excuse to get out our tools and play mechanic on our toys. Fred brings up a very real point regarding over doing it with the bolts and screws. Too many times we have read the trials and tribulations from those who over torque bolts and strip out case threads where no such excessive torque was necessary. Right from the factory I have had screws and bolts so ridiculously tight I wonder if the Rock was doing the assembly. I just swapped wheels on my wife's car, factory installed, and one lug nut required an 18 inch breaker bar and a 2 foot piece of pipe over it and my full weight to get it loose. I have found similarly tight screws on our TWs so there is no telling if the pneumatic tools used on the assembly lines are properly set. An oil change with the filter requires 1.4 US quarts so the price is not at all a big deal.

GaryL
 

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Metal Fragments are sometimes called "swarf". It's the continuing self-machining and cleaning out of all the engine parts when new that are starting to work together. Japanese bikes are so tightly put together and mass produced that they have it down to a science. But not matter what you're going to be getting some swarf in your filter or on top of your drain plug when new. Goes for trans/gear-box fluids and oil as well.

My Russian-made Ural had loads of it coming out every time I changed the oil when new. These bikes are made by hand in pretty much the same primitive conditions and factory as the first one built in 1938-1939. It truly is a part of the Soviet machining process.

Swarf. Your just seeing a bit of it getting caught & trapped before the TW filter. That's a good thing and a good reason to do a couple oil changes when new. Magnetic Drain plugs.
Swarf%20Trans%20fill%20plug%2020%2C000km.JPG

Not Swarf (and not my rig either Thank God). This is technically called a serious problem!
jEwpcSYl.jpg
 

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I'm in the crowd of "it's cheap insurance or a good piece of mind" to change your oil early and often on a new engine.

It's not just the break-in time or new parts mating and wear off pieces. There's also assembly or manufacturing debris to get rid of, sometimes assembly lube, which is good for initial starts, but you really doesn't help the oil. Also if you are interested you can monitor what comes out. And I like to do it until I don't see large metal, or other particles in the oil. Then I'll go to the 500-1000 mile oil changes or whatever you like to do.
 

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Great input by all. Regular maintenance and monitoring is key. Continue the routine maintenance and it should last a long time. Unless you totally wear it out like Fred breaking the frame.
 
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