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Discussion Starter #1
I’ve ordered some stiffer front springs to accommodate my excessive downward gravitational disposition, and while I am no stranger to mechanical work, most of my motorcycle work has been limited to wiring, assisted engine work and basic maintenance...

So before I get waist deep in replacing the fork springs, is there anything the experienced folks on the forum might recommend to save me time and headaches?

I.E. special tools, laying parts out, stuff to have before hand, what order to do stuff in, etc.
 

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This would be a good place to start. Typically no special tools required but to fully disassemble the fork tubes you do have to make a special removal tool which basically is a 2' threaded rod with two 3/4" nuts locked on one end. If I've got this wrong someone will correct my memory and better describe it to you.
 

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Check the fork oil level first. If it is low the front end is very soft. Bring it up to about 130 mm and you might be satisfied with it and it is a lot cheaper than buying new springs.

It worked for me. My TW used to bottom out all the time and now it bottoms very seldom. Hardly ever. It worth a try.
 

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Discussion Starter #5

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I just did the springs and emulators on my forks last weekend. If you're only doing springs it should be quick and easy. If you're doing anything with the lower section, you can improvise a tool for it with the nuts/bolts as mentioned, or Napa/Evercraft have a 19mm hex head socket that almost works. It's a bit too large to fit in the tube, so I turned it down a few mm on the lathe and fits nicely. I took pics of the guts with everything lined up as it goes if you're interested.

I also did the rear spring (both front and rear were the highest rate available from Procycle as I too am not of a petite disposition, ~250'ish at 6'2"). It feels like an actual motorcycle now instead of riding a wheeled waterbed.

Might also be good to do fork boots as a preventative measure if they have some age to them. Beyond that, keep everything clean and you should be good to go.
 

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I also did the rear spring (both front and rear were the highest rate available from Procycle as I too am not of a petite disposition, ~250'ish at 6'2"). It feels like an actual motorcycle now instead of riding a wheeled waterbed.
Slight hijack...on the rear spring what method/tool did you use to compress the spring for removal?
 

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Slight hijack...on the rear spring what method/tool did you use to compress the spring for removal?
I wouldn't recommend doing it the way I did it. When/if I have to do it again, I'll buy or fabricate some properly sized spring compressors or try the floor jack and strap method.

That being said, I used one of the two pronged hook type spring compressors made for car size springs (this style), made sure at least one hook on each end of each compressor had a good bite, covered it with a folded up moving blanket to help keep things from flying, and puckered/winced my way to a successful spring swap after having it pop loose a couple times.


Just for emphasis, this is not a good way to do it, risks life and limb, you'll shoot your eye out, etc...
 

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Slight hijack...on the rear spring what method/tool did you use to compress the spring for removal?
Where there's a will there's a way. This is how I do it. It's not the safest technique but if you take your time and be careful it works. The hardest part was getting the straps just right so the shock would remain upright and not flop over. With everything (spring) strapped down you don't really have to worry about projectiles just the shock flopping over rather quickly.

 

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Where there's a will there's a way. This is how I do it. It's not the safest technique but if you take your time and be careful it works. The hardest part was getting the straps just right so the shock would remain upright and not flop over. With everything (spring) strapped down you don't really have to worry about projectiles just the shock flopping over rather quickly.

This is the only way I have done it and was not completely happy with it tbh. Was looking for some good alternatives. Maybe this is the best way. Thanks nihil and admiral for the replies.
 

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Slight hijack...on the rear spring what method/tool did you use to compress the spring for removal?
I have tried several techniques for removing rear shock springs, but have found this tool to be the easiest, quickest and safest​ way to do it.

100_4731.JPG

Not sure if it is still available, but here is the info from when I purchased it about 6 years ago.

SCN_0008.jpg
 

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As an aside to the present conversation - be very very careful compressing those things using straps - one slip, and you've got a jaw breaker on the loose .....
 

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I have tried several techniques for removing rear shock springs, but have found this tool to be the easiest, quickest and safest​ way to do it.

View attachment 192016

Not sure if it is still available, but here is the info from when I purchased it about 6 years ago.

View attachment 192022
Thank you Brian. I just grabbed one. VERY well worth the $37.
 
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