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Discussion Starter #1
I first checked the technical section and then the performance section, using advanced search and did not find an answer.
On a washboard road, yesterday, the front suspension seemed a bit harsh.
Reminded me of my first new bike, a 1967 Honda CB160 on which I broke 5 headlight mounting rings from jumping it in the woods near McGuire AFB.
Now, I really not not expect it to have suspension for jumping...it's just that the TW fork action reminded me of it.
On my early seventies Yamaha enduros, changing fluid was easy, with drain screws at the bottom of the forks.
Not as easy on the TW.
So, rather than experimenting with different viscosity, what has already been tried?
I am not doing wheelies and I am not planning on jumping it...other than front may have been a few inches off the ground over whoop-de-doos on the trail, after Gass Peak Road officially ended.
 

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These do have the drain screw on the lower fork leg. A Phillips (probably a JIS) screw. The top cap on the TW is easy to put on or off. Others on here have recommended 130mm fluid height. I have only used 10 weight so I can't give recommendations there. Be sure and check the manual for procedures.
 

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SportsterDoc, were you bottoming out the ~6 inches of suspension travel, or was the "harshness" reported due to insufficient travel being used to soften the washboard impacts? Two opposite causes could be at play for you; either too firm, or too soft.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
SportsterDoc, were you bottoming out the ~6 inches of suspension travel, or was the "harshness" reported due to insufficient travel being used to soften the washboard impacts? Two opposite causes could be at play for you; either too firm, or too soft.
Fred, that is a very good question. At the time, it seemed harsh, undampening, that the forks were not moving enough.
However, after starting this thread (i sometimes do things backwards), I went out to the garage and pushed on the handlebars.
They seemed soft. I am 182, but with gear, probably 200#

So, maybe they were bottoming, although they did not have the slamming feel that I've felt in stock forks of the enduros of yesteryear.

There is another factor to this equation. Either I am not as good a rider as I remember being or age is simply making me much more cautious.
Due to the cobble on the road, I was only doing 15-20 MPH. Had I been doing perhaps 30, maybe I would have felt the washboard less.
North and east of Corn Creek Springs, I am finding a lot of sizeable loose rock.
When speed was attempted, my front tire would plow, instead of going where I wanted.
This is not the type of riding as found around Randsburg, where slaloming around creosote bushes at 60 MPH was comfortable, i.e, relatively soft terrain, but not deep sand.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Did you see this under Lizrdbrth tech tips in the tech stickies? See post #10 and post #13. The zip tie drill. I haven't messed with my forks yet but probably will before Moab.

http://tw200forum.com/forum/technical-write-ups/2786-fork-oil-changing.html
Thanks, Tweaker.
With fork boots, I am not seeing fork travel.
All three of my early seventies Yamaha enduros ran heavier oil, a tad more oil level (son't ask me to remember what a tad was) with stock orifices.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the update. A dumb move on Yamaha's part.
Annoying, but probably saved Yamaha a few Yen, which kept the purchase price more affordable.
 
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I like his methodical set up first set the sag for your weight with proper spacer, then add oil in increments, then change weight if needed.
 

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Following Lizrdbrth's instructions step by step made my bike feel like a real motorcycle. Before that it was like a kids rocking horse...
I like his methodical set up first set the sag for your weight with proper spacer, then add oil in increments, then change weight if needed.
 

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I like his methodical set up first set the sag for your weight with proper spacer, then add oil in increments, then change weight if needed.
When I added a spacers, 3/4" and fork oil, I was impressed at how much better the TW was on washboards. Doesn't eliminate all the unwantedness of washboards but makes it much more comfortable enabling a bit of confidence.

On my next TW, I went with 1/2" spacers with additional fork oil and it feels just as good.

Spacer and fork oil level were obtained by the Lizrdbrth method.

Rider weight, more than 279 and less than 281!
 

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If you don't mind for reference post your weight. This will give a good ball park figure. It would be cool if we had a chart for different weights.
 
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