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My '99 is starting to show its age and coastal use almost exclusively around the welds where paint is bubbling and/or flaked off.

I initially planned on tearing it down and doing a complete cosmetic refresh but since its great mechanically and the the only real cosmetic issues are the aforementioned welds (which I'm worried may become structural if not addressed), I'm thinking about just addressing the problem areas.

Has anyone else done this? If so what were the results? What paint did you use (I would prefer it to match the factory)? Thanks!
 

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If you don't need to tear it down don't do it!
One of mine that only needed cosmetic touches is still sitting because it's easier to just ride something else and time is always short. Ride, ride, ride.
 

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I'd touch it up, maybe with POR15 or something like that. I wouldn't disassemble unless I knew I wouldn't be riding or had something else to ride, plus the time, space, and all the little things you might wanna replace as you reassemble.
 

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if you tear it down you will end up doing far more work than you thought or planned to, personally i'd remove cables, panels, lights and just spend time masking off the bits you don't want painted.
 

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I am in the process of rebuilding a 1987 BW350 that was also showing some age at the welds but was otherwise in real nice shape. I removed a red painted part from the frame and took it to the Auto paint store. They have a machine I will call a paint color photographic analyzer and they took a picture which ran through the computer. Then he was able to mix the color and put it into 2 rattle cans. It cost me $30 for the works but the color match is as near perfect as I could ever hope for and it also takes into account the age fade of the original red. The rest of the process is an art in itself where taping off all the parts you don't want over spray to show on. Again, the automotive paint store has just the right tapes and papers for this. I still have to now reverse the process and tape off all the fresh painted red parts so I can do the black on the engine. It is a toss up as to weather it is easier to tear the bike down to the frame to do it right or to spend the hours taping and spraying things in place. Properly prepping the welds before paint is a major key to getting it to look good and last. I used a couple different wire wheels on drills and a dremel tool to clean all the rust and crud off and then used Prep Sol before I painted. With automotive paint I am pretty confident it will last but with off the shelf spray paints I have had less than great results. I did have a set of aluminum car wheels powder coated a few years ago and was very impressed with the results but that was a rather painless thing to have done except for the cost.

GaryL
 

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Try PJ1 spray paint .Great to work with. PJ1 make paints with many factory colors. If you have the time tear it down and paint. the 200 is an easy bike to wirk on.
Powder Coat is the best.I did my mx bike frame.Still looks new.
 

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One little trick I noticed the painters at work doing is using aluminum foil for masking . Much easier to use because it keeps its shape.
Great info Pete! The tin will form around the tight spots way better than the paper and tape I used and probably easier to form around stuff. Pretty expensive though but time is money so I will use that trick myself when I do my engine. I bet I spent a few hours just covering all the stuff I did not want paint over spray on so anything that makes the job easier and less time consuming is fine by me. Color matching is the most important part of doing half a job on frame paint once you cover the parts that you don't want over spray on but it can be done with great results. The frame up and under my fuel tank was still original and bright red but the rest had some fade in it and the automotive photo analyzer got that about as close as I ever expected it would. Red is a rather tough color while black and blue frames may not be so critical.

GaryL
 

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I'm just touching up spots with a wire brush and a paint pen for now.

If the day comes when I need major work I'll pull it apart and powder coat or paint it. The auto body shop we work with has some very tough paints available.
 

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If a bike is new, or paint is in overall good shape, or recently touch up/sprayed and gets chipped, and you don't want to 'go heavy', paint pens work well.
I've done a ton of touch ups on black frames or silver paint chips, or chrome.
They also come in most standard colors and some metallics, but it's tough to match. Black comes in gloss or flat.
Get the chip real clean with solvent of course, and try to avoid leaving too much paint in the chip...it will run or sag.
Paint will usually "flow" into cracks.

I showed classic & vintage Brit & Euro bikes for years that I also rode (never owned a "show-only" bike!) and part of the show prep was fixing paint chips, nicks & cracks.
I know were not "trophy hunting" with our li'l T-Dubs, but who doesn't like to have a good looking, corrosion free bike? :cool:

Ditto all above with small bottles of enamel & small "artist" brush.
This is usually better overall, for sure on larger chips.
 

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If you do decide to use paint make sure to put a clear coat over it. That way it will be protected from gas and oil products. If not then it will be washed away from spills.
 

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I live right on the Gulf coast in Florida, it's my backyard, and I have just about given up on trying to fight rust. Everything metal that I own - motorcycles, trailers, golf cart, cars - rusts from the moisture and salty air here. At least once a year I scrape or sand the bubbled paint and rust off my bike, coat it with Ospho (a rust converter) and repaint spots with a brush using a colored rust inhibiting paint that matches the bike. Even my Cyclerack totally rusted after 5 years, and the new one I got as a replacement not even a year ago, is rusting again right through its' powdercoat. So much for a "quality" product that can't even sit outside without deteriorating.
What I just found works the best is to spray the areas with a galvanizing coating (comes in a spray can like paint) then repaint over it. So far no rust coming through, even on a rusty coated boat trailer fender. This coating and its' adherence to the metal seems to do the trick. Time will tell how long it lasts.
 

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I think getting my bike powdercoated was the best decision, but it was in rough shape cosmetically. You'll spend more time and money than you think for a rebuild, but it will come out better than any paintjob.
 

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I would disassemble and blast the frame. Then prime with the heavy galvanizing compound. That stuff works great.
Then I'd repaint as stock.

Took a whole CT70 to the body shop supply house a few towns away once, just to get a couple of cans made up for a restoration of another bike. That spectrometer camera device is spot on.
 

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Chain lube - gets into where paint doesn't - repeat each year ...... ;)
This right here is good advice. Been using it for years on various bikes. where the flaking was minimal and did not warrant a complete tear down and respray. There are alos some great paint safe spray on corrosion inhibitors in the hard ware store (Marine section) that works extremely well.
 

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This right here is good advice. Been using it for years on various bikes. where the flaking was minimal and did not warrant a complete tear down and respray. There are alos some great paint safe spray on corrosion inhibitors in the hard ware store (Marine section) that works extremely well.
Chain Lube or oil in general can and do get into places where paint may not. This cannot be denied but there is another effect of this oil where it does get into. Oil tends to provide a sticky surface for other debris to cling onto. Oil grabs dirt, dust, salt and any other crud and allows for it to stick like glue and often times the oil that should be protecting breaks down and gives these debris a vehicle where they can remain stuck doing the damage. Some years back us older guys will remember how our cars and trucks were sprayed with a tar/oil based undercoating substance that was supposed to protect the metal from corrosion. The undercoating actually did work quite well as long as it was properly applied and had no adherence issues anywhere where it was applied. Where ever the stuff did not adhere it allowed water and other contaminants to get in so under the topical under coating the frame was rotting worse than had it not been undercoated. Where ever our TWs are ridden in a salty environment it is always best to wash the salt off as soon as humanly possible and in those areas on the frame where ever water and salt tend to pool they should be dried off and any welds should be sealed so as to never allow the intrusion of water and salt. The swing arm and by where the shock mounts is a constant problem area that should be addressed from day one.

GaryL
 
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