TW200 Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,831 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Fred,

Remember that sprig of mint that you tossed in the back of my truck after our easy single track Rubicon ride?

Well, I successfully managed to smuggle it across the border into California (what a surprise!) and my wife stuck it in some dirt. As you can see, it seems to be doing quite well despite the drought (must be all that recycled shower water that we collected all summer). Since the nighttime temps are expected to drop below freezing this week, Barb is wondering if she should cover it to protect it.

I gave her my expert opinion (no, it's a weed!), which she of course promptly ignored. So I will defer to your green thumb and vast knowledge for what she should do.

Thanks in advance,

Brian


100_4568.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,206 Posts
No cover-up needed if you just want it to survive. If wife wants leaves un-burnt by frost then bring inside garage or cover Brian.
The mint thrives here without any over-wintering protection but dies back to twigs every fall, the regrows from spreading runners like strawberries in the spring. It seems extremely cold hardy as surprisingly do many succulents like your mint's neighbor.
Also spreads from seeds. It can get pretty invasive and you or your neighbors might regret my giving it to you if it escapes in your lush landscaping.Keep it caged in that cute pot and then you can more easily control its spread.
It looks really happy there as a color pot. A second pot could be made that would allow you to harvest from to make tea, mint juleps, mojitos, air freshener, decorate a lamb dish, etc without worry of damaging pretty pot's appearance and thus getting banned by Barbara to the garage and your TW collection.

P.S. It is supposedly good at repelling rabbits and other browsing critters, the mint oil is one of natures many chemical weapons. I love its appearance, flowers,taste, aroma, the way it chokes out invasive grasses, etc and would let it run wild here but it was deemed a weed by Mrs. Fred after it choked out one of her pretties. "Yes Dear, I'll weed out the mint right after I get back from my TW ride."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,170 Posts
I bought my wife this mint about ten years ago and planted it in her flower bed. It took over and every year she started B about how she didn't like it. I knew she was working hard to control it. I just ask her if she ever got it under control. Her reply was... "yes! It's gone I used Roundup". :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
587 Posts
We use mint around our garden to repell rabbits also. Great for mojitos :). We cover ours when we get frost also. But being in a pot like Fred said easy to just bring in garage overnight.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
You can bring mint inside. Angel kept mint and other spices/flavors in pots. She used them when cooking. Most did well all winter in a sunny window. Few did well in the greenhouse, most prone to fungus infections promoted by high humidity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,236 Posts
My wife worked at a mint still in high school during summer vacations. Even though there's lots of urban growth throughout the valley, we still see many fields, though the stills and fields are quickly declining. Odor is really strong during harvest/production.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
Mint smells better than marigolds stink, so they are good near each other. Mint keeps out the browsing mammals, marigolds keep many insect pests away. Good combination for organic gardening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,170 Posts
We use mint around our garden to repell rabbits also. Great for mojitos :). We cover ours when we get frost also. But being in a pot like Fred said easy to just bring in garage overnight.
I use my garden to attract rabbits so I can have meat with my veggies :eek:
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top