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Perhaps a tank saddlebag would be ideal in your situation.

Marty
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I have balancing beads. The tire is bumpy at low speeds but we figured it's from poor building. It's well seated, nice and even. You could say I miss the Anakee...
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·

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Another option would be a forward mounted backpack.

Best of luck to you in whatever you decide.

Marty
 
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Depending on what you are carrying what about a loop stile bag and slide it up more onto the back of the seat and down to the passenger pegs if you can move the weight forward and lower it might help. In the dirt i mostly stand or slide up to the tank.
 

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when i first got my tw i experienced some scary speed wobbles at highway speeds. my steering bearings were a bit worn, and i was running ~30+psi in both tires. in cars and trucks, i generally like the crispness and effeciency of keeping tire preasure up. i run the rears close to max rating, and then drop front pressure a bit till it settles.

after getting rid of the bearing wobble, and a bit of front brake drag from a sticky cable, a new tire, and balancing my own tires - easy - adhesive lead weights, and you can also check the run-out (wobble-deviation) on the rim and/or tire, i never get those wobbles anymore, maybe a taste if one hits road weirdness or something.


one wants to get rid of things that generate inherent instability or allow it to build. for instance, if your rim is an ounce out, and your tire half an ounce, and they end up mounted so they add not cancel.. personally i'm suspicious of tire beads/slime, etc. centrifical force is gunna send them to the outermost spot, which may or may not be where weight is needed. i haven't used them though. address the basics - bearings tight, runnout, balance, tire pressure.

what tire matters, and what combo of tires. i've mostly run the stock tw dirt tires, though mostly on pave.

22 front, 30 rear.

i weigh 150, and i routinely carry say, a 20litre water bottle, plus tools, plus beer, on a rear rack, entirely aft of the seat. i compensate forward a little, but not much.

racks on the forks will mean slower steering response, and catch crosswind.
 

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Perhaps it's time to get one of those little motorcycle trailers.
 

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A couple of questions i have. First is how does it feel at slow speeds? Second is does it do the high speed wobble with just you and no luggage? If you have never tried the bike at speed with no luggage you may have to do that to rule out chassis issues.

If it does the high speed wobble or tankslapper unloaded you may well have a chassis issue. in this case I would start with the steering stem bearings as oldword 124 mentioned..... Bad steering stem bearings will definitely cause tank slappers to happen. Not only would i check for stifness i would check for lateral pay when you have it off the ground.

Also check the rear swingarm bushings. Just like the stem bearings bad swingarm bushings will cause tank slappers as well.

Lastly, tires, check the balance.

If the chassis is fine with the bike unloaded then you have to look at the weight you are carrying. How much total weight are we talking about here? in my experience the TW can carry a fair bit of weight but stability can definitely suffer. What you may be looking at to fix it in that case is less weight, or a stiffer rear spring or both. You can also try raising the forks a couple of mm in the trees but that also changes the steering geometry a little and can make it twitchy.

A little story, we recently took a trip on our TW's and i definitely experienced some stability issues with the bikes due to the weight we were carrying.

This is what our TW's looked like loaded up with everything we needed for 6 days of camping, clothes, food, tent etc.


Needless to say the bikes did not handle very well at all with this much weight on them. As they sat both bikes have the white pro cycle spring on them so they were already better equiped to handle weight than a stock bike. Her bike was set to the lowest preload setting mine was set to the middle. Both bikes i barely got out of the garage before i was like no way we are riding these all the way to the Canadian border like this. The front felt like it was going to wash out on any corner just putting in the yard and on the street at like 20 mph the bike was super sketchy.

I ended up having to take the shocks out and set the preload to max on both to get them rideable. In her case because she is lighter than I at 125lbs the bike was great for her. Mine was ok too but at 185lbs i wish i still had the heavier red spring on mine but the white one at max preload was rideable for me. There is no way we could have put this kind of weight on them with stock springs.
 

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Is there any chance of moving your luggage, or at least some of it, just forward of the rear axle? Quite a bit of difference between that and it hanging past the rear axle.

Marty
This. At 5'2" (unless you have freakishly looong arms & legs) you're most likely already sitting up on front of seat, therefore getting to Marty's point....you have some available real estate on the seat. Whatever you're carrying back there, may start with the heavier items, and move them forward, as long as they can be placed securely.

Start experimenting.
 

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Take all the stuff off the bike rack, take it for a ride - if it handles well - it's your stuff on rear rack. Rides poorly, you have another issue.
I've carried heavy loads with no issue
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
All your inputs are highly inspiring. I am considering drilling new holes in my paniers to bring them a couple inches forward. Never thought of that option. They do extend behind the rear axle as it is. I'ld make sure they don't get in the way but with the new seating position plus my mini size it should be ok. Low side tank bags would make the front end feel heavier without loading the fork directly. I had shopped for those but never ordered.

More comeback later. Lunch break over :)
 
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Hey, good advice on comparing unloaded to loaded performance, also ensuring your rear suspension is configured to handle your max loaded weight and you run the air pressure that best balances your bike.
If you superimpose a triangle over the side profile of your bike, utilizing the front and rear axles as the lower points and the top of your head as the apex you want, need, to have all the weight possible inside that triangle. This will allow the bike to operate at its best.
Also, the more you can stay "on the power" the better your bike can handle a loose surface such as gravel or sand as it "loads" the rear suspension, this may require running a lower gear than normal to control speed.
For me, it's much easier to handle these surfaces while standing as it allows controlling the bikes direction by tiny balance inputs through the pegs.
Sounds like a great excuse to do lots of focused riding! ;-)

Bag
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
217063
 
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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Ha ha ha! 😄

I could have chosen the panniers narrower too, but I really thought it through, and I wanted the convenience of the cargo space. These panniers are exactly what I needed. They are well-built, they lock, they have not loosened once since I use them. I am a fan of the brand. The setup is solid rock and I like the looks now that I got used to it 😊. I can now get to work and organise my stuff in a minute. I stop at the store and just lock up whatever and go do my shopping in peace.

I only have a stretch of 6km of high speed to ride twice daily. That's my commuting setup and I love it. I just have to find a way to make it work... safely, despite being a lightweight person. As I mentioned before, this discussion is highly inspiring.

It doesn't take a minute to remove the panniers for the weekend, when I want to ride off-road, or cruise longer stretches of high-speed road.

Strangely enough, I remember that although I was afraid of how they would affect the handling when I started driving with them on, I was pleased with how they felt. Even in the wind. I knew it would feel different, but I was willing to sacrifice some comfort for convenience.

Good thing I'll have more free time in the next few weeks. I'll be doing all the relevant checks: steering bearings, tire, unloaded handling... all that was kindly suggested by you guys! 😊 Testing improvements too.
 
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