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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

Bought a new TW200 on the July 30th after 5 rides over 3 days and a piece of bailing wire poked the center of my front tire. Now i wish i would have purchased the tire protection plan, oh well.

My questions are:
Are there tubes in these tires?
What is the difficulty factor to remove the front tire for repair? (2015 Disc brake)


Thanks for any help :)
 

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You can also get a heavy duty tube for that front tire if you want. You might consider putting some Ride-On in it when you fix it. It balances and seals leaks.
 
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O, and welcome to the forum!!! :D
 

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Morning MacRocker, and welcome. The very same thing happened to me. I picked up a 6" strand of high tensile dragline off a logging road. I replaced the tube and bought a can of fix-a-flat just in case. Guess what, 2 rides later, 12 miles in, I get another flat. The 2 other riders I was with were astounded when I pulled out that can, we finished the day no problem.



There are other sealing products like "ride on " and "slime" that seal minor leaks. I personally won't go anywhere w/out it now.
 

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Welcome MacRocker. Front tire flat repairs are not difficult. Youtube some how-to videos, or simply remove front wheel yourself and take to a shop for an affordable repair if you don't have the tools or inclination to do complete flat fix yourself.
 
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Morning MacRocker, and welcome. The very same thing happened to me. I picked up a 6" strand of high tensile dragline off a logging road. I replaced the tube and bought a can of fix-a-flat just in case. Guess what, 2 rides later, 12 miles in, I get another flat. The 2 other riders I was with were astounded when I pulled out that can, we finished the day no problem.




There are other sealing products like "ride on " and "slime" that seal minor leaks. I personally won't go anywhere w/out it now.
So this will work with a tubed tire? Never gave that a thought!

Jim
 

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I replaced my front tire and put a HEAVY duty tube in.... That was like making love to a Tasmanian Devil... HOLY CRAP!

Jim
 
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If you choose to do it yourself, make sure first that there is nothing else sticking through the tire – you can do this by running your fingers around the inside of the tire if you wish, but be warned, you’ll probably find something by ripping the tips of your fingers.

You’d be surprised at the number of people who forget this and end up with a second puncture.

Oh yeah – and welcome to the mad house ……..
 

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However you cut it, seeing you're TW sitting on a rim is a depressing sight. It's like " oh crap ", you best just suit-up,:boxing: cause your go'n in.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the replies!

One more thing, should i place a wood shim in the brake caliper to keep it from closing?

Thanks again everyone! I'll let you know how it goes!
 

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Flat tires are a fact of motorcycle life. Anyone who hasn't had one, hasn't ridden long enough. Learn to fix it yourself, it ain't hard, just dirty.
 

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So this will work with a tubed tire? Never gave that a thought!

Jim
Yes, but only as a temporary fix until you can pull the tube and patch it or replace it....Same for Ride-On and Slime. I moved to Ride-on specifically so I don't always have to carry a can of Fix-a-Flat.
All three still have the problem that if you have a big enough hole or a sidewall tear they will not work at all. Fortunately that doesn't happen often if you are reasonably careful about what you ride over or right next to, like a chunk of cement with rebar sticking out of it! :eek: :eek:
 

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If I'm running the "isle-of-man" on my TW, I'll change the tube after a flat, " cuz i'm not stupid"...But if I'm exploring some old 2 track logging roads, it's sealant, who cares. Kinda like " if it ain't broke yada yada. Ive read that if you have a flat, "replace the tube" you purists Guy's w/ the ride-on, How do you know you don't have a flat......?
 

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I dont worry about it, its only flat on one side.........the bottom. Once the whole thing goes flat then maybe Ill do something.

 

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..... you purists Guy's w/ the ride-on, How do you know you don't have a flat......?
Excellent question! If the stuff works as advertised, the only way you will know in the short term is to closely inspect your tires for the telltale spot of congealed sealant, IF the puncturing item is gone, or the item itself, if it stays in the tire. I suppose I should go do that now, it's been two years since I put it in. :p

For anyone using Ride-On, you are supposed to pull the object and ride about 2-3 miles at slow speed then check and add air if necessary. HOWEVER, that advice is for tubeless tires.....there is NO advice for tubed tires except to add 25% to the recommended dosage, and I for one would be inclined to leave the object in there and head directly for the truck or for home before I pulled it out, UNLESS the tire was obviously already losing air, in which case I might as well pull it out as the situation can't get any worse by doing so, and might get better. The theory here is that the smaller the hole, the better this stuff is supposed to work. The exception to this idea is if you have puncturing object that has big parts NOT in the hole, and every revolution of the tire works it around in the hole, destroying the seal constantly. My 2 cents. :)
 

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So this will work with a tubed tire? Never gave that a thought!

Jim
It will get you a lot closer to home, cell service or a better place to fix it instead of becoming a pedestrian :)
 
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I'm still learning this motorcycle fixing stuff, and I changed a front tire for the first time after watching this on You-Tube:

I didn't find it difficult, except for the part where you have to reach inside the tire and find the valve stem and get it poking through the rim. I finally got it, but I also got one of these:

0000-bikemaster-tire-valve-stem-puller----mcss.jpg

A month or two later I got a puncture in a rear tire, and using this tool made fixing the tire WAY easier. It is is easily worth the $6.36 they get for it in terms of saved hassle and prevented scrapes on hand. In case it isn't obvious, the little brass part is poked through the stem hole from the outside. It then threads into the stem where the valve core isn't, ending up no larger in the diameter than the stem itself. This makes it easy to pull the stem through the hole.
 

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I'm still learning this motorcycle fixing stuff, and I changed a front tire for the first time after watching this on You-Tube:

I didn't find it difficult, except for the part where you have to reach inside the tire and find the valve stem and get it poking through the rim. I finally got it, but I also got one of these:



View attachment 20711

A month or two later I got a puncture in a rear tire, and using this tool made fixing the tire WAY easier. It is is easily worth the $6.36 they get for it in terms of saved hassle and prevented scrapes on hand. In case it isn't obvious, the little brass part is poked through the stem hole from the outside. It then threads into the stem where the valve core isn't, ending up no larger in the diameter than the stem itself. This makes it easy to pull the stem through the hole.
Looks like a handy tool. Twilight, had me put on a shinko and a heavy tube. didn't take long to take the stocker off with his handy tire irons. Had the axle size wrench on one end and tire tool on the other. We put on the shinko and it took more time to get the valve stem in the hole than it took to mount the tire.
 

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You don't even have to take the tire completely off the rim, or even remove the whole tube to repair the puncture Just pull the tube out where you think the puncture is and if you find it, put on a patch. If you fix this yourself, be very careful when you use the tire irons to put the tire back on the rim so you don't pinch the tube and have to do this all over again.
 
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