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if the old won't come of with tire irons don't force it.. and just cut the tire open.. a broken or chiped rim will cost you a lot more over time than a bad tire..

what tire did you buy?
 

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Breaking the bead of the old tire is the hardest part of the job. To do so I'd first remove the brake disk to insure it is not damaged. Place wooden blocks, 6x6 or several 2x4's stacked on a hard surface at three locations around the wheel, so that they will support the wheel at the rim and the hub is not touching the ground. Stand on the wheel at the rim so your feet depress the side wall of the tire. Near one of your feet place the end of a short (about two feet long) piece of 2x4 on the sidewall right at the edge of the wheel rim. With a 3 pound or larger hammer, strike the end of the 2x4 as hard as you can to force the bead off the rim. It may take a couple of tries, but this method has worked for me.



After that, change out the tires just like you would on your bicycle, except you may want to use something to keep the tire irons from scratching your rims.
 

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My only advice is to use three, rather than two tire spoons. And if you're bleeding and cussing, you're doing it wrong. Change up your method if that happens




As far as putting tires back on, I use a lot of baby powder inside the tire with the tube and I use dawn dish soap around the bead or windex.



Be mindful of your innertube. They're easy to pinch and put holes into.



Changing a tire right still takes a bit of effort, but a 90 pound girl could do it. So just remember that if things aren't working right, adjust your method. That video posted above is really good.
 
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