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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,



when I got the bike I saw the black can attached to the fuel line coming out of the tank and thought "that is perfect, this bike has a fuel filter the size of a soda can". Our gas here has about a cup of sludge and sand that comes for free in the bottom of every 50 gallon drum, and we end up seeing a tone of clogged carburetors.



I was let down to learn that that can is actually a charcoal filter for gas vapors and is not the herculean fuel filter I organizationally thought.



Is there a replaceable element down inside there?



What do you guys think about adding an extra in-line filter before the carburetor?



One of our outboard motors has been retrofitted with two additional in line filters and has run with fewer problems since they were installed.



-Layne
 

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The charcoal canister doesn't have anything replaceable. You just have to replace the entire canister if it ever goes bad. Inside your tank, the fuel petcock has a screen to keep some gunk from getting to the carb, but it's a good idea to get an inline filter to go between the petcock and the carburetor. Get a clear one so you can see if any gunk has gotten in there, or if the gas stops flowing because the screen inside the tank is clogged.
 

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The 90* bronze filter shown has been the easiest with which to work. There really isn't much room down there.
 

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I agree the 90 degree filter is most convenient, but I've never found it. . . so I use the same filter in the straight version with the result that it eventually acquires a bit of a bend from the pressure on it (mine are usually about a 30 degree bend when I take them off for replacement. I carry an extra filter on the bike and if it ever stops in the trail, thats the first thing I'll check for a possible solution. Maybe you can get Gizmow to fill the aluminum case with 1000 of them, and you can develop a PNG franchise for fuel filters. Clean gas is essential. Tom
 

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If you have to use the straight one, get a longer fuel line and make a big loop.




Don't do that, the fuel won't flow. I've tried that and the motor starves for fuel. The straight one works just fine. A 90 degree filter would be easier, but I have yet to find one. I use the a straight filter. Its the same thing as the 90 degree filter pictured, but straight. I had a tough time getting the filter into the fuel line. Take a sharp knife and cut/scrape off the barbs on the fuel filter and it will slide right on. You won't need any clamps because there is little if any pressure in the hose. But what ever you do don't make a loop.



My '90





My Dad's '87

 

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I'm glad you said something. I've done the loop on alot of old bikes and it worked fine. I used the 90 on my TW. I got it at denniskirk.com.
 

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It sounds like a good idea. I had some extra fuel line and I made the the loop. It looked good but as soon as I rode away it sputtered and wanted to die (it was running out of gas).
 

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It sounds like a good idea. I had some extra fuel line and I made the the loop. It looked good but as soon as I rode away it sputtered and wanted to die (it was running out of gas).


That's probably because there was some air left in the line. If the line is filled completely with gas, the laws of physics says that is has to flow.
 

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I've used a straight filter with a 90* brass elbow.
 

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I have put 3155 gallons of fuel through my other single and I have never used an external filter. Most people I know that have used them end up having trouble with them at some point. I don't think it is really needed unless you are in a remote area and use cans alot.
 

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xzyfsk, I agree that under most circumstances, a fuel filter beyond that in the bottom of the tank is unnecessary. However, I'm using a 1987 tank (somewhat rusted interior) on a 2002 bike and figure I need the added security of a second round of filter. For those who store fuel in cans (often cans owned for many years) or those who fuel in dusty situations, and other circumstances a fuel filter is a good idea, but hardly mandatory. Occasionally I see crap that has been accumulated in my fuel filter that somehow eluded the petcock filter and I figure my inline filter paid its way, but that is rare even in the nearly 6000 miles I've ridden with that "rusted interior" tank. I've rebuilt the float valve etc. once in that time and had no other carb problems so . . . cross my heart, I'm going to continue with my inline filter as a cheap form of insurance against a clogged carb jet. Its my $4 insurance policy. Cheers, Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I have put 3155 gallons of fuel through my other single and I have never used an external filter. Most people I know that have used them end up having trouble with them at some point. I don't think it is really needed unless you are in a remote area and use cans alot.


Wow, I take my hat off you friend, 3155 gallons of fuel equates to a lot of miles on on of these bikes. Back in CA, i probably wouldn't add one.



But then again...



if I had a nickel for every time I had to clean the jets on my old CB125...



I would have enough nickels to trade in for a quarter and still have some left over. In retrospect, I probably should have coated that tank.



Layne
 

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The fuel went through my BMW f650 and doesn't do quite as well as the tdub on mpg. It is at 142k and going strong. I love thumpers.
 
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