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I have an EW3000 honda generator. Haven't used it in many years, over 10 at least. It has always been in the dry inside. I took the carb off and gave it a thourough cleaning. Fired right up. Thing is, no voltage. It was fine when put away. Anyone have any ideas? Is a puzzle to me.
 

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It it may sound odd but some generators lose the magnetism (in the stator iirc) and they won't start a field. Google it.. but check for loose corroded connections, fuses etc.. I had one that needed to be re magnetized though after sitting for 12 years.

I have an EW3000 honda generator. Haven't used it in many years, over 10 at least. It has always been in the dry inside. I took the carb off and gave it a thourough cleaning. Fired right up. Thing is, no voltage. It was fine when put away. Anyone have any ideas? Is a puzzle to me.
 

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Yup, generators need something to start the creating of electricity. I've been exposed to this on large hydro generation plants in dams. We get the turbine spinning up, then have to 'excite' the armature windings. Usually with a small motor on top of the turbine attached to the armature with a gear system. Sorta like a motorcycle starting motor. Once the starter motor is spinning from, say push starting, the starter motor itself makes electricity that back feeds to the generator. I better shut up or I'm really going to confuse myself. Ha!!

So here's how to get the genny to make power;

Plug a variable speed drill into the generator and put the drill on low speed. Attach a large wheel to the drill, like a grinding wheel. 3 or 4 inch will do. Fire up the generator with the drill plugged in. pull the trigger on the drill. If the drill doesn't automatically excite the genny, try hand spinning the disc/grinding wheel on the drill (still plugged in and trigger pulled) This should start the genny making power as the drill's motor should produce enough electricity to excite the genny's windings and get the kick start it needs. The reason for a variable speed drill is so when the genny starts making electricity, you don't want to get your fingers or anything caught up in the drill. A slower speed should help with that. If this doesn't work, kick the drill's speed up and try again.

We refer to this in the electric generation business as 'dark starting' a generator. A power house generator can not begin making electricity without this kickstart.

Once you got the genny running like this, I think the magnets will self align the charge on the iron to make them strong enough for self start at a later date.

***EDIT***
I just read the attached link and I see they too recommend the drill start method. The difference is that they say to spin the drill motor in reverse with the drill in forward. I don't see why. I've used my method successfully so maybe it doesn't matter.
 

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Lots of folks here have whole home stand by gensets for when ever the pole power goes off. All of these gensets are set to do a test run for 10-15 minutes once every week for exactly the reasons stated above. All motors and generators benefit greatly from and occasional dry run from time to time so just make sure once you do get it back to producing power that you give it a run every now and then just like firing up your TWs during winter storage. Hope the drill procedure works and bring things back to life.

GaryL
 

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I have an EU6500is which essentially is just a larger version of what you have.
I start mine once or twice a month. Last year when we lost power for a week after a NorEaster it ran for a week, 24/7 so always good to make sure these not-so-cheap things actually do work.
Prior, almost 3 weeks after Hurricane Sandy. Mine taps into a Reliance 10 circuit transfer-switch that I had installed after Hurricane Irma (a year before Sandy) even though we didn't lose power that time.

On mine each receptacle has it's own breaker. And each breaker has a fuse. Start there for a blown fuse or corrosion.
As a side note it's good to run these things under-load sometimes too.


IMG_0588.JPG

You can see the little breakers in this picture.
IMG_0585.jpg


IMG_0480.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yup, generators need something to start the creating of electricity. I've been exposed to this on large hydro generation plants in dams. We get the turbine spinning up, then have to 'excite' the armature windings. Usually with a small motor on top of the turbine attached to the armature with a gear system. Sorta like a motorcycle starting motor. Once the starter motor is spinning from, say push starting, the starter motor itself makes electricity that back feeds to the generator. I better shut up or I'm really going to confuse myself. Ha!!

So here's how to get the genny to make power;

Plug a variable speed drill into the generator and put the drill on low speed. Attach a large wheel to the drill, like a grinding wheel. 3 or 4 inch will do. Fire up the generator with the drill plugged in. pull the trigger on the drill. If the drill doesn't automatically excite the genny, try hand spinning the disc/grinding wheel on the drill (still plugged in and trigger pulled) This should start the genny making power as the drill's motor should produce enough electricity to excite the genny's windings and get the kick start it needs. The reason for a variable speed drill is so when the genny starts making electricity, you don't want to get your fingers or anything caught up in the drill. A slower speed should help with that. If this doesn't work, kick the drill's speed up and try again.

We refer to this in the electric generation business as 'dark starting' a generator. A power house generator can not begin making electricity without this kickstart.

Once you got the genny running like this, I think the magnets will self align the charge on the iron to make them strong enough for self start at a later date.

***EDIT***
I just read the attached link and I see they too recommend the drill start method. The difference is that they say to spin the drill motor in reverse with the drill in forward. I don't see why. I've used my method successfully so maybe it doesn't matter.
I figured I would chuck a hex bit into the drill and chuck my battery powered one to it to spin the slave drill. Should spin it fast enough to get it going. Will let you all know how that works.
 

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I have that one too Mike, as well as a EU3000 and a EU2000.

The 6000 and 3000 are Inverter generators. Do not use the drill method on these from the outlets (or you will damage the inverter board). I am told the inverter boards can excite the field (using the starter battery and some electronics) if need be so i'm unsure if it would evn ever be needed on an inverter model.. I'll look if the time comes.. ;)


Great quiet generators those Hondas, the best I think and I've had over 15 gen sets in my time.



I have an EU6500is which essentially is just a larger version of what you have.
I start mine once or twice a month. Last year when we lost power for a week after a NorEaster it ran for a week, 24/7 so always good to make sure these not-so-cheap things actually do work.
Prior, almost 3 weeks after Hurricane Sandy. Mine taps into a Reliance 10 circuit transfer-switch that I had installed after Hurricane Irma (a year before Sandy) even though we didn't lose power that time.

On mine each receptacle has it's own breaker. And each breaker has a fuse. Start there for a blown fuse or corrosion.
As a side note it's good to run these things under-load sometimes too.


View attachment 190422

You can see the little breakers in this picture.
View attachment 190424


View attachment 190428
 

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Discussion Starter #16
My first thought was somehow something to do with exciting, but didn't know how to give advice. This is good information to learn.
That was my thinking too White, but how to do it was the challenge. glad Ski Pro was familiar with the problem. Just shows there is a wealth of experience here in the TW forum. Just ask, someone usually has an answer.
 

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The article said don’t run out the fuel with a load on the generator as it will drain the magnetism. I always shutoff the fuel when storing and now know not to leave any load attached when shutting down. Great article.
 
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