TW200 Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This could be a useless suggestion (I'm full of em), but on my 48 chevy I epoxied a magnet to the engine oil plug. It was just rebuilt so it seemed like a good idea. It picks up any metal flecks circulating in the oil. When I change the oil I wipe off the magnet. Admittedly I haven't tried this on my Tw cause I haven't seen my oil plug yet (new to me 2001 tw with 5600 miles). Probably all the metal is gone by now, but you guys with new bikes might benefit. You who know might be rolling your eyes at my ignorance. Hopefully you'll dumb me up. Thanks for the great forum!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,417 Posts
Got one of those on mine.

A few years ago a member actually lathed a groove in the oil plug and used a clip to keep the magnet in. Several members got them.

I just used JB Weld.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,030 Posts
After spending around $8 grand on the DR-650 and TW I asked Procycle if it could get me a magnet and was blown off never got back to me.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,030 Posts
I am going to get a oil filter magnet.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
For the TW a good strong magnet placed in the screen behind the oil plug will get the job done. It ain't rocket science. No sense risking a magnet busting loose in your oil pan, simply stick a rare earth magnet to the outside of the oil plug. No problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
i have magnetic plugs on my truck oil drain plug, and front differential drain plug (which i drilled and tapped in). i used small round 1/4" barrel magnets, drilled the stock drain plugs one size smaller, and pressed the magnets in with a vice, so no chance of "migrating".

i have not put a magnet on my tw yet. much of the metal coming off the tw engine is going to be aluminium, so a magnet will do nothing for that, but any steel bits are more of an issue anyway so magnets are good.

the oil disto system in an engine is basically a hydraulic system. on tractor/machinery type hydraulics, the filtration is often done on the return line not the pressure line. so any crap in the resorvoir could get pumped with no filtration.

this seems like a counterintuitive design, my understanding is that filters under high preasure are more likely to fail, and any failure dumps the built up crap directly to the cylinder, hyd motor, etc. filtration on the preasure line may also rob more power than on the return line, post-work. not sure.

my 1960 cockshutt tractor has return line filtration on the engine oil system. it exits the filter and pours into the crankase.
my old f150 l6 has preasure side filtration, oil comes in thru pickup screen, to pump, thru filter, distributed to engine, drains back to crankcase.

the tw has two filters. perhaps the bottom one is the pickup screen, and the top one is post pump preasure filtration?

i would be hesitant about a loose magnet bouncing around inside a filter, potentially damaging it.
a build-up of metal particles on a magnet can break loose in fluid flow or from shaking.
a magnet in a low spot where metal tends to settle anyway seems a safer way to go.

that's just the kinda stuff i "like" to worry about, your results and preferences may vary.

edit* just noticed the suggestion was to "stick" the magnet (on the outside,even), not loose in the filter.

-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,228 Posts
Not pretty but it works.

PICT2457.JPG PICT2450.JPG PICT2454.JPG PICT2458.JPG PICT2459.JPG

JB Weld should work fine. Marine Tex is getting very expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Not pretty but it works.

View attachment 10596 View attachment 10597 View attachment 10598 View attachment 10599 View attachment 10600

JB Weld should work fine. Marine Tex is getting very expensive.

Just a thought, after looking at the pix. Anyone know of any mags that are of the correct size to simply be "pressed" into that smaller recess on the plug? That almost looks like that was where it was SUPPOSED to go, had they opted to include a factory one.

And what about the "heat" factor? Is the heat of an air-cooled engine enough to cause de-magetization?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,371 Posts
The screen on the left side and the filter on the right side should be trapping any of the offensive metal particles floating around in your oil. Keep in mind that magnets are no assurance against aluminum particles. Next time you change your oil dump it in to a clean plastic container. After the engine is completely drained toss a clean magnet into the plastic container and slosh it around. Any metallic particles will attach and give you an indication as to what is in your oil. I personally would not trust a magnet glued in place unless it is glued where there is no chance it could travel if it comes unglued. I would not trust a pressed fit either because with heat the aluminum will expand. A chunk of magnet would do more damage than the particles you want out.

GaryL
 
  • Like
Reactions: williamemack

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,228 Posts
And what about the "heat" factor? Is the heat of an air-cooled engine enough to cause de-magetization?
There is a black magnetic sludge covering the magnet every time I change the oil and it is difficult to wipe it all off. I can slide it around but actually removing it is a little harder. The magnet has been in there about 15,000 to 20,000 miles and seems to still work well. Also, if it comes unglued the magnet will be caught in the screen cage that goes in before the cap goes on, but it shows zero sign of coming loose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,502 Posts
Elime, you might try putting a stronger rare earth magnet in a plastic bag, then use bagged strong magnet to pull metal sludge off of your really slick ,well thought out, fabricated and photo-documented weaker magnets. Next if you reverse baggie you have metallic sludge inside bag, rare earth magnet outside bad, and a cleaned clever oil screen/magnet assembly ready for re-installation. I use the bag-over-magnet trick to pick up loose nails, etc while keeping a clean magnet. Works well when searching for important screws dropped on gravel driveway.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GaryL and elime

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,371 Posts
I might not be up to speed on magnets. I see the term Rare Earth used here and in my audio speakers the magnets with the highest regard are called Alnico. There is also ceramic magnets, rubber ones and probably a few more types. I have two tiny magnets here, don't hammer me on the spelling, Neodendum I think. These things are wildly powerful. I can lay one on my oak kitchen table that is 1.25 inches thick and from the underside of the table I can drag the magnets around the table. If the two magnets stick together my fingers are not strong enough to pull them apart. I guess it's ok to say these Neodendum magnets suck but if they get dislodged and can find a path to metal such as gears you can be sure they will travel and get stuck, maybe where you don't want them.

My Polaris RZR has magnets impregnated in the drain plugs from the factory. They always have a very fine black sludge covering them when I change oil. Very common and nothing to be concerned about. If there is an internal engine problem down the line I suspect I would find chunks and particles stuck on the drain plugs much the same as what we find on the oil filter screen during brake in.

GaryL
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top