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Discussion Starter #1
Have any of you folks who are doing the tubeless thing gone tubeless up front? And if not, why? I would think it would be a natural progression.

Thanks for your responses,
Tom
 

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No, but I would love to see more information on this. I always think Tubliss or Mousse-Bib systems and just say nah seems like too much to deal with and throw a tube in. But, I also have pinched tubes and found patches to not have stellar results. Always curious to see options.
 

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I use the tubliss on the front of the TW, it works great.
The only benefit of the tubliss over simply sealing the spokes and running tube less is the tubliss system acts like a giant rim lock.
You can ride tubliss with low/ no air without rolling the bead, tube less can unseat and are tough to reseat on the trail.

This weekend I had a rear flat and was amazed to ride back over rock, sand and dry lake bed to camp without losing the bead, it was flopping and squirming but stayed seated. I then thought the tire would put up a fight but it came right off with my fanny pack tire irons. This setup can be trail serviced with the right kit. I cheated and used a new tube and air compressor but could have patched it and pumped like on the trail.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your responses.....I might go ahead and try this with my IRC trials tire. Anybody else try this?
 

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I have had the tubeless on the back of the WR. I just found you need to be careful when installing the tire not to "bend" the bead. I tried putting a tire I had previous used on the tubliss and could not get it to seal. Bead was slightly damaged in one spot, so ended up buying a new tire and had no issues. I found this
interesting as it offers another way of installing the system so that the two valves are not a few spokes apart which would provide for better tire balancing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks ejfranz. I'm planning to do the silicone spoke sealant, then the rim strip, using an 8mm valve stem, and just the regular front tire. I don't see why this wouldn't work, but I defer to the TW Brain Trust on here.
 

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Why do you want to have a tubless front tire?
The advantage of the Tubliss system is the ability to run low pressure for traction
I weighed a Tubliss KX450 rear wheel and again w a standard tube set up. The Tubliss Wheel was shocking the smallest bit heavier
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Maxpower, I pinched a tube last time I tried to DIY my new tires. If I don't have a tube, I can't pinch it. But, I could damage the bead area, as ejfranz mentioned. I just think if it is feasible, why not? In the video you posted, Fred, he didn't use a rim strip. I did not know about using a brush to eliminate bubbles. I think maybe more silicone is not necessarily better, but enough to let the rim strip squeeze a little out the sides would be good. I need to find the small valve stems so I won't have to drill the hole out larger. I might want to go back. I hope not. Thanks again for your responses.
 

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I understand the pinch thing. Im definitely not sayibg its silly to go tubeless.It's my opinion the allure of the TW is its simplicity. Making it tubless especially as a dirt bike adds a level of complexity and a weak link for failure. Dirt can get in through spokes. And trying to seat the bead after fixing a flat can be tough away from your compressor.
There are advantages too like no pinch flats from smashing rocks or torn valves from slipping beads while braking. You'll lose a bit of important unsprung weight too. So you can gain beer weight to make up the difference
Keep in mind, I don't even want to pull my carb to rejet or gain access to the hidden air screw because it's running so good.
 

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If one is using any spoke sealant like silicone or urethane that outgasses as it cures then covering the wet sealant with a rim strip will slow, if not prevent, curing.
My tubeless rear wheel has a motorcycle tubeless valve stem the same diameter as a tube's valve thus no drilling. Should work on front rims too.
TuBliss requires drilling a second hole for the second valve stem complicating things if one ever wishes to go back to a tube installation.
Every approach in this discussion and life in general has its advantages and disadvantages. For every disadvantage identified a corresponding advantage can be stated so make your choice and live with the consequences for NOTHING IS PERFECT.
 

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TuBliss requires drilling a second hole for the second valve stem complicating things if one ever wishes to go back to a tube installation.
Most rear wheels have 2 holes: 1 for the valve stem and one for the rim lock. My WR250r had a rubber seal in the rim lock hole, which I image you could buy to plug a hole.
The TuBliss install shows drilling a hole a few spokes away from the valve stem - this hole is already there on the rims used by the European bikes AKA KTM. The
I posted shows how do use the rim lock hole that is common on Japanese bikes so that you do not need to drill the extra hole.
 

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Sorry, figured folks would assume my comments were on topic related to going without a tube in the front wheels of our TWs.
Could have clarified that I guess.
Since TWs do not have rim locks on the front wheel there is a need to drill a second hole for the TUbliss system's air bladder valve stem. to work. The complication of later abandoning the TUbliss system is a possible need to seal the second hole with a rimlock or plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Have used rimlocks in the past, but don't even know if one is available for TW rear wheel. Think I'll try it without rimlocks. Fred, where did you find motorcycle valve stems?
 

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Use 3m 5200 marine sealant on the spokes That's what we use on the klr650 along with tape. Have had zero issues with it so far.

I don't even own a tw200...yet but if it's as reliable as my klr then I won't do many of any mods until it breaks.
 

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Found this looking for trail tube suggestions as I’m new to TWs. Really interesting thread. As a lifelong MTB rider the advent of tubeless was a game changer. Sure you can roll low pressure but for me it was the ability to tune the tire. For my urban assaults I can add/drop 3 psi with noticeable benefits. Tubed would take 7-10 and not have the nuanced differences. I would expect the same for Moto’s. The rim of the TW looks like a challenge to seal. On my road bicycle the carbon hoops from enve spec gorilla tape to seal the spokes and carbon imperfections. I suspect the same can be used for the TW. The next question is the tire construction and if it can support tubeless use. Have this one bookmarked for winter.
 

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I sourced my right angle motorcycle valve stem from my local motorcycle supply store however they are readily available in a variety of colors, lengths and angles over the internet...straight, 45 degrees, right angle, brass, silver, black, etc... valve1.jpeg valve8752b_1.2391894e37b81992990a5997a37c7c24.jpeg
 
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