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Hi folks,

I am a newb to the site.

I am going to upgrade the chain (and therefor change both sprockets).

Anyone know a good chain to use with the stock sprockets?

How many links is the stock chain?

Just realized I am going to have to replace a bunch of gaskets and seals......that is a really annoying chain guard situation.

All the more reason to get a tougher chain.

thinking of getting a EK 428 SROZ chain.

Anyone using that chain?



Thanks!
 

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I have just under 13,000mi on a D.I.D. O-ring chain, lubed with ATF. Someone here mentioned the ATF way back on the other server.

The stock chain lasted me almost exactly 3,000mi, stretched beyond adjustment although well maintained. Saw some gnarly pics of a chain that derailed and ruptured the gearbox...

You'll hear some unreal lifespans for stock chains, they are just as advertised. UNREAL.
 

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Hi folks,

I am a newb to the site.

I am going to upgrade the chain (and therefor change both sprockets).

Anyone know a good chain to use with the stock sprockets?

How many links is the stock chain?

Just realized I am going to have to replace a bunch of gaskets and seals......that is a really annoying chain guard situation.

All the more reason to get a tougher chain.

thinking of getting a EK 428 SROZ chain.

Anyone using that chain?



Thanks!


I've replaced BOTH sprockets a few times now...not a big deal, but it takes the better part of a morning to do. Here is some advice you might want to consider...it's free and worth every penny you paid!


First of all, remove the battery! You have to lean to bike on its side to remove the left cover, so take the battery out (unless you have one of those fancy AGM types) or the fluid will spill out the overflow! When leaning the bike over, make sure it comes to rest on something softish...I used a piece of plywood placed on top of an inflated inner tube; grass might do just as well!

Secondly, draw a rough picture of the cover on a piece of thick cardboard and make a small hole that corresponds where each screw goes. As you remove the screws from the cover, place them into the appropriate hole on your cardboard likeness. There are a few of differing lengths and you want to make sure they go back into the same hole they came out of!

Third, take the cover gasket and trace out a new one onto some gasket-stock. This will save you a few bucks for the next time you want to try this whole operation!

Fourth, remember to tighten the bolts on the drive-sprocket retainer! I had my entire bike re-assembled and then realized that I had NOT tightened them completely!

Fifth, Pay close attention to the wiring harness(es) during reassembly. You do NOT want to pinch and/or damage these!



Definitely invest in an o-ring chain, and don't cheap out on the sprockets either; buy steel instead of aluminum!
 

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I would never use an "O" ring chain on a smaller bike like a TW200. It robs to much power.



Just use a good quality standard chain and good chain wax and your good to go.
 

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I would never use an "O" ring chain on a smaller bike like a TW200. It robs to much power.



Just use a good quality standard chain and good chain wax and your good to go.
Bull crap. Tdub has seen 84mph twice with an o-ring chain. The power loss from an o-ring chain is not detectable by my butt. Also, chain wax is designed for keeping an 0-ring chain from rusting and is not sufficient lubrication for an open chain.



Do not lay the bike on its side to swap the countershaft sprocket. All the crud stuck around the countershaft sprocket is likely to end up in the engine. If you have to scrape the gasket, chunks are likely to end up in the engine. Not good.



I second the idea of a cardboard screw holder. I used coroplast, it doesn't go soggy when oil gets on it.



A new side cover gasket is $4.78. Shipping is free if ordered with sprockets.



I run the EK 428 SROZ. The first lasted 16,000 until I bent it offroad. The second has been on for 24,000 miles, was adjusted once at 600 miles, then has only been adjusted when the wheel was off for tires since, plus once about 1000 miles ago. It still isn't worn out, but I'm expecting it to start stretching any time. I clean it on the bike with a good soaking with SeaFoam DeepCreep and wipe with a rag, let it dry overnight, then lube with Champion Motorcycle Chain Lubricant from Walmart. For street use, chain maintenance is done at 3000 mile intervals. The chain is cleaned and lubed before and after a dualsport weekend as part of the pre-trip prep. Sure, lots of other products will work, but I've not found anything that works as well as the DeepCreep for cleaning and Champion for rust prevention over 600,000+ miles of riding.
 

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Do not lay the bike on its side to swap the countershaft sprocket. All the crud stuck around the countershaft sprocket is likely to end up in the engine. If you have to scrape the gasket, chunks are likely to end up in the engine. Not good.


True...but then make sure you drain the oil before you split the case, or you will have a big mess on your hands! I was able to lay mine down because on the previous sprocket swap, I greased the gasket so it came out easily; another "tip" that I forgot to mention!

Should also mention that the cover might come off part way and then feel "stuck", but it is just the magnets holding it back.





(Come to think of it...I had to drain the oil as well, so laying it down might just be a "preference" for those of us who don't own jacks or are too old to work on our bellies!)
 

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I don't want to start an argument here.



A few years back Dirt Rider magazine did a comparison on standard and O ring chains. I wasn't at the shop when they dyno'd the then current 125 2 stroke it was down on power.



But the real difference was at the track. I being one of the test riders helping out can attest to the loss of power. Even the novice riders could sense the change and that was on a bike that makes more HP and to torque than our TW's. That's why racers never use O ring chains.



Although poking around town or trails or even top speed might not be affected much by an O ring chain.



But for me and the way I ride, I want as much as I can get out of my already underpowered (but great) TW.
 

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If you have a late model TW with stock 14/50 sprockets, this is a good chain... 122 links.



http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/DID-D-I-D-428-V-O-Ring-Chain-122-LINKS-/230591127744?pt=Motorcycles_Parts_Accessories&hash=item35b04d60c0



I have no affiliation with the seller.



jb


+1 This is where I got mine. The price was $61 + $8 S/H - looks like it went up to $65 now...



EK is about this same price now - DID used to be more expensive but price has lowered.



The Professional series DID is much better then the OEM which is a 'cheepy' DID chain.
 

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I don't want to start an argument here.



A few years back Dirt Rider magazine did a comparison on standard and O ring chains. I wasn't at the shop when they dyno'd the then current 125 2 stroke it was down on power.



But the real difference was at the track. I being one of the test riders helping out can attest to the loss of power. Even the novice riders could sense the change and that was on a bike that makes more HP and to torque than our TW's. That's why racers never use O ring chains.



Although poking around town or trails or even top speed might not be affected much by an O ring chain.



But for me and the way I ride, I want as much as I can get out of my already underpowered (but great) TW.


I don't ride on tracks, but I have kept up with a Husky 510 on a twisty gravel road and passed 52 Harleys during one crossing of Tail of the Dragon on a TW with an 0-ring chain. Not that big a deal.
 

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Thanks all - does going up a tooth to a 15T front sprocket change the chain length requirement or will I be okay on length ordering a DID Pro 428V?
 

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Can someone tell me why the chain from Yamaha has 126 links? ...
Older TW's use a 126 link chain. Newer ones use 122 links. I don't remember what year the change was made.



EDIT: According to the oem parts list, 1994 and before used the 126 link chain, 1995 to present uses the 122.



jb
 

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I find it hard to believe that they would missprint the chain size for nearly 10 years.



If that is your implication. Vague one-worded responses are useless.



-sS


What you consider a vague, one-worded response says all that needs to be said. Even Albert Einstein believed things should be as simple as possible, but no simpler.



It's expensive to edit commercial print presses. It's not an inkjet whose output can be changed with a couple of keystrokes. I'm sure the official Yamaha response to anyone pointing out the missprint would be, "Anyone who buys the recommended replacement chain from a Yamaha dealer will get the correct chain length, so it is not necessary to correct the manual."



Anywho, my experience printing manuals is that set-up costs are so high a manufacturer is often better off running 10 years worth of manuals with the only difference being the model year on the cover and title page. It is much cheaper to just make a few changes 9 times than to pay set-up to the printer 10 times.



Besides, there are tons of other "misprints" in both the owner and repair manuals for the TW, and just about every other vehicle on the road today.
 

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I'm sure the official Yamaha response to anyone pointing out the missprint would be, "Anyone who buys the recommended replacement chain from a Yamaha dealer will get the correct chain length, so it is not necessary to correct the manual."


They sent me the 126 link chain, which is of course, WAY TOO LONG, even with the adjuster set to '9'. I had to break off 4 links. which was a pain in the ass since I didnt have a chain breaker. Also the chain comes with a master link, something they don't make apparent when ordering, they are listed as separate parts. Always good to have a spare, though.



So to sum it up, ordering the "correct" part from Stadium Yamaha WILL NOT always get you what you should be using. It IS possible however, that the guys at Stadium Yamaha did not order the chain along with the other stuff, that they saw the 126 "missprint" and grabbed a 126 yammie chain off the shelf. Who knows? Buyer beware, be ready to break it if you have to.



-sS
 
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